WiGig completes multi-gigabit wireless specification

Back in May, the WiGig Alliance, consisting of Microsoft, LG, Dell, Samsung, Intel, Broadcom, among other prominent forces in the industry, aimed to take advantage of unlicensed 60GHz waves and push Wi-Fi to a whole new level. Today, they are one step closer to bringing this technology to the masses. The new standard, which is officially complete, will be approximately ten times the speed of current offerings, yet still be fully backwards compatible with today's Wi-Fi technologies.

WiGig will usher in a new era of multi-gigabit communication. Speeds are expected to be as fast as 7Gbps, making the standard ideal for HD streaming between devices. The specs include support for data buses for PC peripherals, and display interfaces for HTDVs, monitors, and projectors. With such technology, you could easily stream a video in full 1080p from your PC to TV over your home's wireless network.

Here are the finished WiGig v1.0 specs:

- Supports data transmission rates up to 7 Gbps – more than ten times faster than the highest 802.11n rate
- Supplements and extends the 802.11 Medium Access Control (MAC) layer and is backward compatible with the IEEE 802.11 standard
- Physical layer enables both the low power and the high performance WiGig devices, guaranteeing interoperability and communication at gigabit rates
- Protocol adaptation layers are being developed to support specific system interfaces including data buses for PC peripherals and display interfaces for HDTVs, monitors and projectors
- Support for beamforming, enabling robust communication at distances beyond 10 meters
- Widely used advanced security and power management for WiGig devices

President and Chairman of the WiGig Alliance, Dr. Ali Sadri, sees WiGig as the future of connectivity for all devices. "We're rapidly paving the way for the introduction of the next generation of high‐performance wireless products – PCs, mobile handsets, TVs and displays, Blu‐ray disc players, digital cameras and many more."

As WiGig moves forward with the creation of next-gen wireless devices, NVIDIA, AMD, SK Telcom, and TMC have decided to hop onto the bandwagon, further strengthening the Alliance and its overall scope of influence. The finalized specs are to be delivered to Alliance members in the first quarter of 2010. Devices that support the new standard are not expected until, at least, mid-2011.

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24 Comments

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boogerjones said,
Hopefully the overhead isn't 60% like with current WiFi.

I'm sorry, I don't understand what you mean... What do you mean by overhead?

Just curious...

- Support for beamforming, enabling robust communication at distances beyond 10 meters

need more details about this one .. i'm concerned about the range as much as the speed

Bero said,
need more details about this one .. i'm concerned about the range as much as the speed

Indeed. It sounds like range will be an issue... ?

I bought some shiny new 802.11n hardware:

270 Mbps advertised. It's not reliable at that, so I have to step down to 130 Mbps. Actual speeds never get close to connected speed, so that cuts things even more, plus all the overhead and interference means I am lucky to cap at 70 Mbps max. Pretty good, I guess (for wireless).

But of course, that is just wired to wireless. If I transfer from one wireless device to another wireless device, that whole "not duplex" thing kicks in, and I hit a 35 Mbps ceiling.

And again, that is the max speed. Not average. I swear 802.11n was advertised as being able to get 300 Mbps, and I'm barely getting past the 30 Mbps mark.

I would be happy with a 100 Mbps sustained between 2 to 6 devices. That would be like a nice wired connection then.

If this new standard maxes at 7 Gbps, I'm guessing it will connect at just 3.5 Gbps reliably, and transfer at 1.25 Gbps max. So then if I can get a real-world speed of 600 Mbps, that should be plenty.

speed doesn't matter to me that much as stablity and range

Wireless-N barely improved the ranged ,i am really disappointed

Ci7 said,
speed doesn't matter to me that much as stablity and range

Wireless-N barely improved the ranged ,i am really disappointed

I'm disappointed to hear that as well. I haven't yet upgraded to N...

Maximum data transmission rates are all fine and dandy, what I want to know is: what kind of sustained data transmission rates can we expect? Sustained rates on n-wireless are nowhere near the max. I just want a good solid sustained rate that doesn't rollercoaster too much.

I'm fairly certain here, given the fact that this operates at a much much higher freq. than typical wireless devices and networks...that you won't have much issue, with interference.

BigBoobLover said,
Especially since the range will be much shorter than current standards. Little chance (if any) of interference from your neighbors.

Either it's too small a range to work in a suburb house, or it'll be hell in the city.

That is what Beamforming is for. Take a look, it could ramp up power to get a nice narrow fr signal to your long distance receiver and not cause any interference in other directions.

TheChucklesStart said,
That is what Beamforming is for. Take a look, it could ramp up power to get a nice narrow fr signal to your long distance receiver and not cause any interference in other directions.

That sounds interesting. I would be curious to see more of what that technology can do...

Sorry, IMHO we don't need faster, we need ones with less interference.. a few routers render an apartment building a Wifi nightmare.. Even in a town a few houses with wifi will kill your speeds with interference..

I almost always have to crack my North American routers to use wifi channels from Asia, Ch13, so I can have speed without all the other interference..

I have to do the exact opposite, i have to use set my access point to American region to get channel 14. Recently,Telenor, the biggest ISP in Norway made room for more customers in their central where i live, and one week after i picked up 7 more wlan's(with a total result of 15 networks in range). this resulted in my 802.11n becoming unstable and i was no longer able to stream 1080p video go my media center. (and this over a distance of 2,5m trough one wall wooden wall). ch14 no longer did the job, even though the majority of the networks runs of ch01. I had to drill trough the wall use a cabled 1gbit Ethernet connection.

CRAP

At my old Apt, in a building with only 25 Apts, there were 23 Networks..
In the end I just ran ethernet..

And the Idea people will use this for TV's and the like, even in the suburbs it will be wireless hell if it were to catch on.

Wow, I didn't know there were issues like this with wireless to be honest. I guess I'm just far enough away from my neighbors... I would tend to agree then that this needs to be addressed...

7 Gbps? I wonder how much of that we will *actually* be able to achieve. Although I'd be well happy with 1 Gbps to be honest!

Well its going to be fast regardless, but I don't think it can replace 802.11 - this is being billed as a short range technology that can span 1-2 rooms.

I'm not sure what the rate will be if its transmitting across a house.

a1ien said,
Well its going to be fast regardless, but I don't think it can replace 802.11 - this is being billed as a short range technology that can span 1-2 rooms.

I'm not sure what the rate will be if its transmitting across a house.

Yeah, I do wonder what its limitations are with that...