Wikipedia completes transfer of domains from GoDaddy

The impact of the massive protest against the Stop Online Piracy Act a couple of months ago is still being felt. On Friday, the Wikimedia Foundation announced that the nonprofit organization's domain names, including the popular Wikipedia web site, have now been transferred from GoDaddy over to MarkMonitor.

According to the Wikimedia Foundation's announcement:

We had been deliberating a move from GoDaddy for some time — our legal department felt the company was not the best fit for our domain needs — and we began actively seeking other domain management providers in December 2011.

The Wikimedia Foundation also confirmed that GoDaddy's initial support of SOPA also helped in their decision to move their domain names. GoDaddy later retracted their support of SOPA after it got hit with a massive Internet protest in December.

Wikipedia's US web site famously joined with thousands of others on January 18th in going dark for the day to protest SOPA. Their combined actions helped in convincing US legislators to suspend voting on both SOPA and the Protect IP Act indefinitely.

MarkMonitor is a domain name service based in San Francisco. The Wikimedia Foundation says:

The company will help the Foundation consolidate and centralize management of all of its domains, will provide services needed to manage a global domain portfolio and will better protect our domains with additional security features.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Western Digital becomes world's largest hard drive maker

Next Story

HTML5-based iPhone tethering service launched

24 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

We 've used the patriot act as a way to win business over US owned competitors so I guess its time we used SOPA as well
Thanks US government, you moved the digital market to Europe

I moved to GoDaddy back in the day on the advice and advertising of Diggnation, then I moved away from GoDaddy back to a UK company because there was a big hoohar about them taking money without permission. Glad I did. I have no dealings where I have to part with money (painful enough as it is) internet wise with any US company. The US government seems to want to close down the internet into the 'US Internet' with US rules and Laws world wide.

Brian Miller said,
What exactly does MarkMonitor do?

It's mainly a domain company for big companies they will make sure your domain is never down or hijacked for a hefty fee.

Totalaero said,

It's mainly a domain company for big companies they will make sure your domain is never down or hijacked for a hefty fee.

Is that what Facebook uses?

SK[ said,]Lost my respect for ditching its free dynamic DNS services.
I had 4 hostnames registered with them under their free program before they cut it off and luckily I was grandfathered in and allowed to keep the 4 free hostnames which I still use today.

It looks like they still offer a single hostname for free although since I have an active account I haven't tried it.

http://dyn.com/dns/free-vs-vip/

Orange Battery said,
Good for them, I wont be renewing with GoDaddy when current subscription expires - glad I only went for a year this time.

You know you can migrate a domain half way through it's registration period right? The remaining time on the domain transfers over with it.

TCLN Ryster said,

You know you can migrate a domain half way through it's registration period right? The remaining time on the domain transfers over with it.


Remaining time doesn't transfer...

THE END said,
good move!

WTF is Markmonitor? I went to their website to see if I could transfer my domains, and from what I saw, it looks like they just offer "wanky" over priced services to internet illiterate corporate boneheads. I'd highly doubt their claim that half the Fortune 100 companies "rely" on Markmonitor.

dvb2000 said,

WTF is Markmonitor? I went to their website to see if I could transfer my domains, and from what I saw, it looks like they just offer "wanky" over priced services to internet illiterate corporate boneheads. I'd highly doubt their claim that half the Fortune 100 companies "rely" on Markmonitor.

That's the nice thing about the internet. You can make any claim you want and it's damn near impossible to prove whether it's false. They have a list of their customers on their site, which I would guess is just a partial list, but some of the names are big names. What's funny is that this internet company that claims to have all of this digital knowledge also has many broken links on their site. I found 4 broken links on their customer page alone. To me that reflects poorly on a company with their alleged expertise.

Tim Dawg said,
That's the nice thing about the internet. You can make any claim you want and it's damn near impossible to prove whether it's false. They have a list of their customers on their site, which I would guess is just a partial list, but some of the names are big names. What's funny is that this internet company that claims to have all of this digital knowledge also has many broken links on their site. I found 4 broken links on their customer page alone. To me that reflects poorly on a company with their alleged expertise.

If you have thousands of domains you would more than likely know who they are. I have no idea who their big name customers are, but I know one is google or at least was last I knew.