Will the Samsung Galaxy S IV have an eight core processor?

A few weeks ago, the SamMobile.com website claimed to have received an image of a render for the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S IV smartphone. Now that same website is reporting that a device that could be an early version of that still unannounced smartphone has been detected by a benchmarking program.

The site claims that the Antutu Benchmarks program has generated stats that seems to confirm it has encountered both the Korean and international version of the Android smartphone, with Samsung's in-house Exynos 5 Octa processor running things inside at a clock speed of 1.8 GHz. The "Octa" in the name means that the chip has a whopping eight processor cores inside.

Actually, as we reported earlier this month, the Exynos 5 Octa processor has four ARM Cortex-A15 CPUs along with four ARM Cortex-A7 CPUs. Still, if this chip is indeed inside the Galaxy S IV, it could prove to be the most powerful processor ever put inside a smartphone or tablet device.

The same site claims that the Samsung Galaxy S IV will have a 4.99 inch screen, 2 GB of RAM and a 13 megapixel rear camera that supports 1080p video running at 30 frames per second. The site also claims the smartphone will have a two megapixel front facing camera and will have the "Jelly Bean" version of Android out of the box.

We should learn if this site's information is indeed accurate later this year; Samsung is expected to officially reveal details about the next Galaxy S smartphone sometime this spring.

Source: SamMobile.com | Image via SamMobile.com

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I thought 8 cores is a little overkill, specially for a phone, (smart or not) I've got the quad core 1 gig ram version of the s3, I haven't noticed any input lag or slow downs. In a pc, great...

Loving all the hater comments from WP users, Throw more cores at it? What should microsoft do, they've tried everything and still their market share continues to dwindle below 3% lol

Sonne said,
Loving all the hater comments from WP users, Throw more cores at it? What should microsoft do, they've tried everything and still their market share continues to dwindle below 3% lol

Originality award goes to....

Sonne said,
Loving all the hater comments from WP users, Throw more cores at it? What should microsoft do, they've tried everything and still their market share continues to dwindle below 3% lol

Actually those hating are the Apple boys. WP users just don't care what you are using as long as it ain't Apple.

That's one thing Android and WP users have in common.

Actually battery life will be better since the work load is distributed among each set of cores. The four Cortex-A15 cores ensure incredible performance while the other four are low-power Cortex-A7s that kick in for the less demanding tasks and save battery power.

One may find this article helpful in finding out how big.LITTLE will work in the Linux kernel and most likely how it will work in Android. https://lwn.net/Articles/501501/

Basically, there's one of two ways that big.LITTLE chips can operate.

1) The chip is exposed to the OS as a quad-core and whether the A7 or A15 is handling a task is based on clock frequency scaling, which the Linux kernel has been equipped to do for a while. This method has some limitations on SoCs that have more than one core per clock domain. Whether or not this is the case with the Exynos 5 Octa is unclear. This is the simplest way of supporting it, and most likely the method that will be used on shipping hardware.

2) The chip is exposed to the OS as an 8-core chip and the kernel scheduler decides what tasks go on what cores. This has some of the biggest limitations due to the scheduler in Linux treating all cores equally when this obviously isn't the case. There's been some extensive work done on a new real-time scheduler so that it can actively load balance tasks between the more powerful and less powerful cores. Since this is currently experimental code maintained outside the mainline kernel, it seems unlikely that this method will be used anytime soon. It probably will be in the future due to there ostensibly being a 10-20% performance boost associated with it on big.LITTLE chips.

I don't know where you guys are experiencing laggy android, but with my galaxy s2 running custom roms its smooth as silk.

anyway I feel phones don't really need more cores or need to get much faster,, I much rather see all the companies focus on battery life, nearly all the smart phones need a daily charge and sometimes twice a day with really heavy usage.

hell my quadcore s3 also runs as smooth as butter, espicialy compared to my single core htc legend bring on the new soc =]

I love how people equate Samsung's hardware to Android's performance. Silly. Just because Samsung has decided to utilize an 8 core processor, means absolutely nothing with regards to Android. Samsung != Google. Samsung != Android. Samsung is merely a manufacturer.

lol, you guys do realize that before you go on your hate fest that these types of processors HELP with battery, they are more efficient than the older ones. This isn't a Pentium4, they didn't just slap an extra core on there.

My dual core GS3 is smooth as can be, and I have a ton of crap running, not sure who would need more than 4. Looking forward to the day when I can buy a windows phone with all the portable apps I want and have the ability to just dock it anywhere to anything for desktop, tablet or whatever else I want. Figure it's not far off. For now, Android is my choice...but definitely rooting for Windows.

This is pure marketing. While the octa is an 8 core SoC only 4 cores can be in use at once. It is built using the big.LITTLE concept. 4 big cores (a15) for heavy workloads, and 4 LITTLE cores (a7) for lighter workloads. ARM created the a7 specifically for this purpose to help compensate for how power hungry a15 is. Give me a Qualcomm Krait any day. Power efficiency and performance in one package.

Also, my galaxy nexus and my nexus 7 run smooth as a hot knife through butter.

Can someone please justify why I need 8 cores in a phone? I don't have 8 cores in my main computer!

The only benefit I see is for battery if the clock was really low and they only turned on extra cores as needed. But a clock speed of 1.8 ghz? Am I missing something as to why this is needed?

Supposedly, only a few of theses cores are the 1.8ghz beasts. The rest are lower power cores used when the high-speeds are not needed.

It's needed to run Android ALMOST as smoothly as a single core WP7 phone.

But seriously... oh wait, i am serious. And i explained how the cores work above.

cores just means more proccessing... and capable of more Task...but would never meet the powers of a 8 core AMD Desktop cpu for sure.. it would blow the phone up for sure..and would require some badass battery...nuclear powered im thinking

I'm not a scientist or anything so I don't know how batteries work, but since people refer to batteries having "juice" and "draining" them, maybe there should be a little diaper around the battery that catches the juice as it drains out so it can be recycled into the battery. Then we would have much longer lasting battery life.

Enron said,
I'm not a scientist or anything so I don't know how batteries work, but since people refer to batteries having "juice" and "draining" them, maybe there should be a little diaper around the battery that catches the juice as it drains out so it can be recycled into the battery. Then we would have much longer lasting battery life.

Draining is a perfectly proper term to use. They are full of charge. That charge is drained out of the battery when it is used.

If you are interested in understanding the basics, I recommend learning about RC circuits on Wikipedia. Batteries are similar to a charged capacitor that discharge in a closed circuit.

Thank you for the wonderful educational lecture. We have taken a note of it and live in a world vastly better as of that moment.

Phouchg said,
Thank you for the wonderful educational lecture. We have taken a note of it and live in a world vastly better as of that moment.

Your Welcome

lomas said,
will the 8-core processor drain the battery even faster?

This phone will never use more than 4 cores at a time. The A15 cores ramp up when it needs performance (running a game or launching an app). But the rest of the time the slower A7 cores are in use. And these should use less power than the current quadcore Galaxy S3 (international version). So no it wont use more power.

lomas said,
will the 8-core processor drain the battery even faster?

This depends on the OS and mechanism for conservation. Powering down cores when not underload can be quite effective.

Being Android, it will be based on how 'good' the Samsung specific drivers for power management are.

Considering how poorly Android JVM threads, and Linux having trouble managing more than 8 core processors with the current kernel, it would be strange for this this to have any performance advantages over even quad core Android devices.

(If they were talking about running WP8 and the Windows NT kernel that can manage and scale to 64 cores with almost no overhead, it would seem to make far more sense.)

thenetavenger said,
Considering how poorly Android JVM threads, and Linux having trouble managing more than 8 core processors with the current kernel, it would be strange for this this to have any performance advantages over even quad core Android devices.

As i mentioned right above, it never uses more than 4 cores at once. The extra four A7 cores are purely for power saving.

But even at the same clock speed as the international Galaxy S3 quad core (1.4GHz) this will still be faster as it uses four ARM A15 cores. Which are considerably faster than the A9 cores in the GS3.

Voice of Buddy Christ said,
With all this hype, the day will come when Samsung's anti-iPhone ads are turned against them.

Thrre ads srent anti apple. They criticize thebstupodity of fans and a phone that is so far behind it isnt even worth being a topoc for conversation

TechieXP said,

Thrre ads srent anti apple. They criticize thebstupodity of fans and a phone that is so far behind it isnt even worth being a topoc for conversation

That English...

TechieXP said,

Thrre ads srent anti apple. They criticize thebstupodity of fans and a phone that is so far behind it isnt even worth being a topoc for conversation

Phones are more or less the same these days. We're just fighting over superficialities.

Also, that's some horrible autocorrecting going on your end.

PmRd said,
Finally, Android may be able to run smoothly

Jelly Bean runs very smoothly on low hardware if it doesn't have a manufacturer skin on. My friends old Galaxy Nexus is smooth as butter while my other friends GS3 on 4.1 still judders sometimes.

PmRd said,
Finally, Android may be able to run smoothly

+1 i lol.
however, it is not right. i use my galaxy note in eco mode (1 active core) and it runs pretty fine.

Smooth as butter with small bread crumbs inside. No matter how powerful or vanilla your device/rom is, Android will still lag for seemingly no reason every once in a while. It's just something you have to deal with.

PmRd said,
Finally, Android may be able to run smoothly

Obviously you've never used Android. Its been smooth since 2.1. You stick to yoir boring iPhone and letbus have the real phones.

TechieXP said,

Obviously you've never used Android. Its been smooth since 2.1. You stick to yoir boring iPhone and letbus have the real phones.

I own a Nexus 7 and a Windows Phone, not a boring iPhone. I also own a Surface and from my experience anything that's running Windows is way smoother than anything running Android with the same hardware specs.

When it comes to software it's hard to beat Microsoft.

TechieXP said,

Obviously you've never used Android. Its been smooth since 2.1. You stick to yoir boring iPhone and letbus have the real phones.

Since 2.1? Are you stupid?

Changes specifically in 2.2 and 2.3 to the JVM scheduling and memory management reduced performance, causing it to perform slower than 2.1 and dump Apps more frequently.

There is a case for the latest Android release that it doesn't suck as much as previous versions, as there is a bit better access to the GPU; however, in terms of performance or getting the most out of the hardware, it significantly lacks in comparison to iOS and is a massive reduction in performance compared to WP8 (Which is running the full Windows NT code base with 100x the complexity of Android.)

2.1 got OpenGL ES up to a usable level, that was one of the better early releases, although feature-wise 2.2 and 2.3 were important to get features on par with iOS and the upcoming WP7. However, these were not about performance, whatsoever.

And YES, I have used Android and use Android, and I would bet, FAR MORE than you or 99% of the people reading Neowin. I have three Android devices sitting on my desk at the moment, one being an early Droid release, a tablet, and one of the latest phones that I'm not even sure is purchasable yet.

PmRd said,

I own a Nexus 7 and a Windows Phone, not a boring iPhone. I also own a Surface and from my experience anything that's running Windows is way smoother than anything running Android with the same hardware specs.

When it comes to software it's hard to beat Microsoft.

market numbers say otherwise.

thenetavenger said,

Since 2.1? Are you stupid?

Changes specifically in 2.2 and 2.3 to the JVM scheduling and memory management reduced performance, causing it to perform slower than 2.1 and dump Apps more frequently.

There is a case for the latest Android release that it doesn't suck as much as previous versions, as there is a bit better access to the GPU; however, in terms of performance or getting the most out of the hardware, it significantly lacks in comparison to iOS and is a massive reduction in performance compared to WP8 (Which is running the full Windows NT code base with 100x the complexity of Android.)

2.1 got OpenGL ES up to a usable level, that was one of the better early releases, although feature-wise 2.2 and 2.3 were important to get features on par with iOS and the upcoming WP7. However, these were not about performance, whatsoever.

And YES, I have used Android and use Android, and I would bet, FAR MORE than you or 99% of the people reading Neowin. I have three Android devices sitting on my desk at the moment, one being an early Droid release, a tablet, and one of the latest phones that I'm not even sure is purchasable yet.

the first Android phone I ever had was.a Droid Ibcredible which had 2.1. It ran just fine. In fact it ran much better than the iphone 4. 2.2 made it ecen better. Sense did begin to slow it a bit, but I fixed that.

I own a Galaxy Notr 2 now and it runs nice. No phone has more ram...no phone has as mich power or is as big.

You are entitled to your opinion, as I am with mine.