Windows 7: Calibrate your display

In part one of our overview of Windows 7, we looked into Federated Search. In part two, we looked into the improvements in UAC. In part three, we look into the new Display Color Calibration tool included in Windows 7.

Windows 7 includes the option to calibrate your display. Calibrating your display ensures that the colors are displayed correctly on your monitor. You can control factors such as gamma, adjust brightness and contrast and color balance. The wizard is very simple to use and each step has detailed instructions and steps to achieve correct color representation.

You can access the Display Color Calibration(DCC) tool from the Control Panel:

Below are some of the wizard screenshots:

Notice in the above screenshot that you can compare your current calibration settings with your previous calibration settings.

The Display Color Calibration tool is a treat to photo/video editing users as they can easily adjust the screen's color appearance. But still it is sometimes necessary to tweak your display settings using your graphic card vendor's control panel. In future, graphic card vendors can make use of the DCC tool to calibrate the display.

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MarkusDarkus said,
Look. It's the same guy from the MCE display calibration video.

Yep, Microsoft took that to Control Panel in Win 7

This is an overview of Windows 7 based on some dude that thinks this is important. I dont think this is a "MacWorld" destroyer.

Come to think of it, the only calibration tool that I recall seeing back when I used Windows was the one supplied by the video drivers, ATI and Nvidia. And they were pretty basic.


Ledward said,
What are you trying to say here? Doesn't OS X list the most menial, tiny little things as a new feature?

Not exactly. I thought this was one of those standard features like the calculator that was always there as a matter of course.

Ledward said,
What are you trying to say here? Doesn't OS X list the most menial, tiny little things as a new feature?

I have looked at that list. It's hilarious. The only sad part is realization that many people drool while looking at that silly list of "300 new features" with their empty eyes.
  • Empty Trash Button
    Empty the Trash from the Trash itself with the Empty Trash button.
  • New Fonts
    Use new built-in fonts such as Arial Unicode, Microsoft Sans Serif, Tahoma, Papyrus Condensed, and Wingdings.
  • Rich Formatting Options
    Add style and layout to your email messages with richer formatting in Mail, such as bulleted and numbered lists, indentations, and background colors.
  • Desktop Picture
    Turn any photo you find on the web into your desktop picture with one click.
  • Warning Before Closing Tabbed Window
    Have Safari warn you before closing a window with multiple tabs, just in case you meant to close a single tab.
  • Signed Applications
    Feel safe with your applications. A digital signature on an application verifies its identity and ensures its integrity. All applications shipped with Leopard are signed by Apple, and third-party software developers can also sign their applications.
  • Icon Mode in Open and Save Panels
    View your files as icons in the Open and Save panels, just as you would in the Finder.
  • Adjusting Window Settings
    Customize the look and feel of Terminal with new window settings. You can set the background color and text color.
  • Russian Localization
    Mac OS X Leopard is fully localized in the Russian language.
  • Polish Localization
    Mac OS X Leopard is fully localized in Polish.
  • Portuguese (Portugal) Localization
    Mac OS X Leopard is fully localized in Iberian (Portugal) Portuguese.
  • etc...

I wonder why didn't they count Wingdings as a separate feature.

RealFduch said,
I have looked at that list. It's hilarious. The only sad part is realization that many people drool while looking at that silly list of "300 new features" with their empty eyes.


We weren't even discussing that. But since you brought it up:

You forgot to add that menial "monitor calibration" tool to that "silly list", which has been on that list for YEARS now.

And don't forget "UAC that isn't broken", which has also been on that list for YEARS, and which even the object of everyone's ignorant derision - Linux, has also had for YEARS. Maybe MS finally got that right. Which still begs the question why it wasn't in XP from the very beginning. Then again, MS had the great foresight to ship that bunch of spaghetti code with 5 open ports. So why be surprised.

Don't forget to add that OS X is NOT littered with files all over the place that can run some sort of internal scripting engine. :D

How about mentioning the Mach-based micro-kernel with the BSD personality layer that emphasizes the minimal use of the kernel for providing system services, so that everything is a separate process which helps partition other processes.

LTD said,
You forgot to add that menial "monitor calibration" tool to that "silly list", which has been on that list for YEARS now.

Are you suggesting that monitor calibration tool is a silly thing? I don't think so. (removed "Photo Browser" from the list...)

LTD said,
And don't forget "UAC that isn't broken", which has also been on that list for YEARS, and which even the object of everyone's ignorant derision - Linux, has also had for YEARS.

Windows had accounts rights management since the first NT. It's the same in any modern OS. There are limited accounts and "administrator" accounts. When I try to write to / under Windows XP limited account I get "Access denied" error. In Linux I get the same error. If you are logged on as a user with admin priviledges the operation completes successfully. There is a "Run As" command which allows you to run application with another user's permission. What's the difference? What's broken?

LTD said,
Maybe MS finally got that right.

No, they didn't. Vista bashers and MS-haters have done their job. The feature is broken now (some of the modes) since "no dim" mode is insecure.
LTD said,
5 open ports. So why be surprised.

Do you use an OS where "open port" = "security hole"? I pity you.
BTW, how many ports does Mac OS X have typically open?

LTD said,
Don't forget to add that OS X is NOT littered with files all over the place that can run some sort of internal scripting engine. :D

I don't understand you. Are you talking about Apple Script or Automator?

LTD said,
How about mentioning the Mach-based micro-kernel with the BSD personality layer that emphasizes the minimal use of the kernel for providing system services, so that everything is a separate process which helps partition other processes.

How about mentioning .

LTD said,
There's lots more to drool about with "empty eyes", while you're busy trolling.

I prefer not to drool looking at tools.
LTD said,
Would you like me to go on?

Not before you tell me everything about open source http://www.neowin.net/news/main/09/01/03/i...d#comment705942

This is a great new feature I'm excited about. This should have been a part of Windows years ago. I can't tell you how many times I've looked for a decent freeware application to calibrate my monitor, only to end up on sites singing Adobe's calibration tool praise and glory.

On my Flatron screen the default colour settings are 6400k and it does not matter how it's setup I just can't see icons in explorer very well, the edges fade into the background. Mabye there should be some infomation for users about colour temp? The brightness and contrast configs are too subjective, they should replace those tests with when these two shades of black merge.

That's supposed to be the color calibration? When I read the title I was excited but that's just weak. What Windows needs is a similar color calibration found on OSX where you can adjust the colors as well.

well in osx apple knows exactly what kind of video card they have. So you should compare the calibration in video card drivers (which have color options) with osx calibration

neoraptor said,
well in osx apple knows exactly what kind of video card they have. So you should compare the calibration in video card drivers (which have color options) with osx calibration

and the blame goes round and round, politics and excuses.

neoraptor said,
well in osx apple knows exactly what kind of video card they have. So you should compare the calibration in video card drivers (which have color options) with osx calibration

Microsoft certifies the drivers in Windows, just as Apple certifies the drivers in OS X, therefore Microsoft knows just as much about the video cards used in Windows as Apple knows about those used in OS X.

offroadaaron said,
and the blame goes round and round, politics and excuses.

It isn't a blame game. It is stating a fact. Apple officially supports a limited selection of video cards. With Windows you have the primary manufacturers and then many many generic manufacturers with their own custom drivers, software and hardware changes.

roadwarrior said,
Microsoft certifies the drivers in Windows, just as Apple certifies the drivers in OS X, therefore Microsoft knows just as much about the video cards used in Windows as Apple knows about those used in OS X.

Microsoft certifies SOME of the drivers for Windows. Last I checked you can install non-certified drivers. Personally I'd prefer to leave color correction up to the hardware (monitor) and the individual manufacturer's software to ensure everything is done accurately.

It is also worth noting that the integrated color correction in OSX isn't perfect. I'd recommend SuperCal on OSX or ideally an external hardware measuring device if you want accurate calibration.

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