Windows 7 inside nearly 5 percent of tablets shipped last quarter

Windows 7 was made for laptops and desktops, not for the growing trend of touch-based tablet devices. However, according to a new story at ZDNet, Windows 7 is indeed in a few percent of all tablets shipped worldwide in the April-June quarter of 2011. The new stats come from the research firm Strategy Analytics and they show that Apple's iPad is still by far the dominating product in the tablet space. It currently has control of 61.3 percent of all tablets sold, but that number is down from 94.3 percent from the same period a year ago.

Android based tablets, which were inside 2.9 percent of tablets just a year ago, has jumped up to 30.1 percent in the last quarter. Microsoft's OS, namely Windows 7, which didn't have any market share in tablets a year ago, is now at 4.6 percent of all tablets in the last quarter. The QNX operating system, which is the one running inside the Blackberry Playbook, is now in 3.3 percent of all tablets. "Other" operating systems take up the remaining .7 percent. The survey says that the tablet shipments do not include e-readers.

In terms of the amount of tablet units shipped in the last quarter, the study says that the iPad shipped 9.3 million units versus 4.6 million tablets that have Android inside. Only 700,000 tablets were shipped in the last quarter with a Windows operating system. Microsoft is hoping that Windows 8, which should be released in 2012, will help boost their tablet share and take some of the market away from Apple's iOS.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

India now blocking file sharing websites

Next Story

Microsoft generates $17.37 billion in revenue in latest quarter

32 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

I've had a tablet for three and a half years. Started off with Vista and it was great, then went to 7 and it was even better.

btw, Windows 7 *was* built with touch in mind, albeit not everywhere.

Bern@rd said,
I've had a tablet for three and a half years. Started off with Vista and it was great, then went to 7 and it was even better.

btw, Windows 7 *was* built with touch in mind, albeit not everywhere.

You are right. It is a shame that MS have not done a better job getting this info out their and getting slates shipped through their partners. Windows 8 will fix it all.

derekaw said,
getting slates shipped through their partners.

Too bad non of the available slates is without flaws…

"Windows 7 was made for laptops and desktops, not for the growing trend of touch-based tablet devices."

Complete bull. MS has been designing and releasing tablet editions of their operating systems, including Win7, for nearly a decade now.

Windows tablets were designed for resistive touch technology , that's what was available at the time, hence the need for a stylus and the traditional windows desktop. Apple introduced the iPhone once the technology matured.

Joe05 said,
Windows tablets were designed for resistive touch technology , that's what was available at the time, hence the need for a stylus and the traditional windows desktop. Apple introduced the iPhone once the technology matured.

Windows 7 tablets were designed for capacitive screens....

Joe05 said,
Windows tablets were designed for resistive touch technology , that's what was available at the time, hence the need for a stylus and the traditional windows desktop. Apple introduced the iPhone once the technology matured.

And btw, a stylus is used for ACTUAL work, a.k.a. taking math notes in class or drawing art in Photoshop... etc.

Samsung777 said,
I'll wait 'till Win8 and see what will happen...

Yes, a lot of people won't even consider an Apple product. Windows 8 on slates will swoop in and clean up the tablet market. This will put Windows way ahead very soon.

At this rate the amount of slates running Windows 7 will go from almost nothing to almost nothing in the next year.

andrewbares said,
How did Microsoft have ZERO market share a year ago? They've had tablets over FIVE years ago.

They had close to 100% market share 5 years ago.

I have to take issue with a couple of points in the article.

Windows 7 was made for laptops and desktops, not for the growing trend of touch-based tablet devices.

Really? I suppose all those touch features, handwriting recognition, etc were added for the laptops and desktops it was made for. I'm sure Microsoft had more than a passing interest in making Windows 7 tablet-friendly. (http://windows.microsoft.com/e...products/features/tablet-pc)

And surely the headline here is that iOS is installed on 61.3% of all tablet devices sold last quarter - not that Windows 7 has a meagre 5% share, despite having the world's biggest software company behind it.

Garry said,
I have to take issue with a couple of points in the article.

Really? I suppose all those touch features, handwriting recognition, etc were added for the laptops and desktops it was made for. I'm sure Microsoft had more than a passing interest in making Windows 7 tablet-friendly. (http://windows.microsoft.com/e...products/features/tablet-pc)

And surely the headline here is that iOS is installed on 61.3% of all tablet devices sold last quarter - not that Windows 7 has a meagre 5% share, despite having the world's biggest software company behind it.

I have an Asus EEE Slate and an iPad 1. The iPad is good for reading mail, light browsing of the web. And while this article treats tablet like an after thought for MS, that thought is very wrong. Features such as swipe to navigate between pages in IE have been there for a while - unavailable in the iPad and just added to OSX in the version released yesterday. Pen support - yes for Windows, no for iOS. Handwriting reco - yes for Windows, no for iOS. Support for more software goes to Windows. Can you run a real copy of PS CS5 on iOS? Not on my iPad, but I can on my Asus and use the pen to free-hand draw.

The only problem with the Asus is the battery, but when you are running Photoshop, that is more than expected.

Garry said,
I have to take issue with a couple of points in the article.

Really? I suppose all those touch features, handwriting recognition, etc were added for the laptops and desktops it was made for. I'm sure Microsoft had more than a passing interest in making Windows 7 tablet-friendly. (http://windows.microsoft.com/e...products/features/tablet-pc)

And surely the headline here is that iOS is installed on 61.3% of all tablet devices sold last quarter - not that Windows 7 has a meagre 5% share, despite having the world's biggest software company behind it.


Anything pre Windows 8 wasn't designed for a capacitive touch screen, hence the lousy experience.

Don't even think this is a story worth reporting.

Joe05 said,


Anything pre Windows 8 wasn't designed for a capacitive touch screen, hence the lousy experience.

Don't even think this is a story worth reporting.

Really, so all the capacitive TabletPCs are imaginary? Where did you come up with this crazy idea?

Additionally, you assume that capacitive is the 'best' technology, and it is rather good, but nothing when compared to image based input devices. You know like Microsoft Surface uses. Image based touch displays can not only sense the points, but can see the shape and size and pressure applied, and even take a picture of things sitting on the screen.

Windows Vista was the first OS designed around integration of the TabletPC XP features along with touch technologies, and specifically used as the basis for the first generation Microsoft Surface computing technologies, BEFORE the freaking iPhone existed.

Go Bing/Google TorchLight if you think that touch technologes are an 'after thought' in the world of Microsoft or Windows. (PS It is from the early 00s, and it also part of the technology that Kinect uses, in addition to Surface.)

As for Windows 7, you do realize it inherently supports 50 simultaneous touch points, with pressure, and other data like image, etc. Which is far beyond what a capacitive screen technology can do?

Well, considering that there are not many options of tablets running Windows 7, and the fact that Windows 7 was not designed for tablets, I think it's great news. Personally, I'm looking for a replacement for my current Laptop, and I want a Tablet, but not an standard tablet, I want a PC Tablet, which means that it's a laptop with a Tablet design because I need to run applications like Photoshop, Visual Studio, Office, etc...

daniel_rh said,
Well, considering that there are not many options of tablets running Windows 7, and the fact that Windows 7 was not designed for tablets, I think it's great news. Personally, I'm looking for a replacement for my current Laptop, and I want a Tablet, but not an standard tablet, I want a PC Tablet, which means that it's a laptop with a Tablet design because I need to run applications like Photoshop, Visual Studio, Office, etc...

the problem is, for some reason all OEMs keep releasing convertibles with quite unusable for such needs screen resolution of 1280x800. I have Toshiba tecra M7 that has 1440x900 and it's 5 years old now. I didn't find any other tablet PC's that are at least 13-14" and have at least 1440x900 display.

daniel_rh said,
Well, considering that there are not many options of tablets running Windows 7, and the fact that Windows 7 was not designed for tablets, I think it's great news. Personally, I'm looking for a replacement for my current Laptop, and I want a Tablet, but not an standard tablet, I want a PC Tablet, which means that it's a laptop with a Tablet design because I need to run applications like Photoshop, Visual Studio, Office, etc...

As for Win7 not being designed for Tablets, I truly have to disagree. Windows 7 has the TabletPC and Touch technologies, which are the basis of UI technologies used in both the iPhone/iPad and Android.

Give me 5minutes with a Windows 7 Tablet (or Touch Screen Desktop) and I can make it work and feel more like a touch/tablet UI than Android or iOS, using the built in OS features. I can even make it work and look or feel like iOS or Android depending on what the user is familar with, or a hybrid of what they like.

The only 'issue' is applications that don't adhere to the UI settings, and they work like they always did, but don't have easy to touch UI options, like Photoshop for example, but it works well with a Stylus.

Some of the tricks in the Windows 7 UI settings:
1) Folder Options
- Enable Check Boxes for Selection
* Also nice for non-tablet people
* Works more like Android Gallery for example.
- Enable Single-Click to Open Items
*This makes Explorer feel like Android or iOS
- Turn on Large Icons, and Apply it as Default to all Folders.

2) Dock/Float the 'true' Tablet/Touch keyboard, and make sure predictive typing is enabled.

3) Turn on Speech - and have it on the Taskbar to pop open quick and respond like Voice Search on Android does (Except it does more than just commands)

4) Appearance - Change the 'Size' of UI items (Title Bar, Icons, etc). This way you can get large buttons for minimize, close, and large UI buttons.
*This is one of the most important and overlooked things.

5) Resolution - Make Text Larger - Custom - Set the DPI scaling to be accurate or even a bit larger, and turn of XP DPI Scaling. This will make older software use the larger toolbar buttons, and will scale the UI up a bit to be finger friendly.

6) Put the Taskbar in the position the user wants, and Pin the correct items to it that touch user would need access to.

7) Adjust gesture settings to what the user expects, and ensure they are enabled.

8) Move the users to Apps designed for touch, and away from the ones that are less friendly. For example, Use Windows Media Center for Video, Music, Pictures instead of Windows Media Player, as Media Center was designed for simple user input, especially touch. (Zune Software also works well on a tablet.)

Then spend a couple of minutes to show the user the touch features they don't realize are there. There is a lot of things that just work with touch, but people don't try them as they instead try to interact with things on the screen like they would their mouse.

Windows 7 is a better Tablet/Touch OS then people realize, even with the normal taskbar and explorer as the interface.

yowan said,
But Android will always rule the tablets

Saying anything will ever 'always' be, when it comes to tech, is INCREDIBLE failsauce.

There are no constants in tech. Even Moore's Law has had a rough time.

Does the Nook Color count as an e-reader, or a tablet? It's got a color screen, runs android, has an app store, but it's sold by a book company. It also probably has about 20% of the market, if you included it as a tablet.

Thankfully Microsoft is setting hardware standards that must be adhered to for Win8 Tablets, the amount of companies shipping woefully underpowered tablets running Windows 7 is shocking.

Benjy91 said,
Thankfully Microsoft is setting hardware standards that must be adhered to for Win8 Tablets, the amount of companies shipping woefully underpowered tablets running Windows 7 is shocking.

Then they wonder why the dont sell well.