Windows 7's Calculator bundles real-life uses

Calculator is one of the programs that Microsoft has 'upgraded' to a much nicer interface (than what is available now) in Windows 7. The new Windows 7 Calculator now has 4 different modes :

  • Standard Mode
  • Statistics Mode
  • Programmer Mode
  • Scientific Mode

This default calculator goes above and beyond the brick on your desk by including unit conversions, date calculations, and a neat new set of "templates" that let you do things like figure out gas mileage, hourly wages, mortgage payments, leases, and more. Check out some of the calculator goodness in the Windows 7 Preview here

News source: Lifehacker

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Intel prepping for launch of Core i7

Next Story

Windows 7 to allow PC backups to network share

18 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Calculator's kinda buggy though. For example, if you do 200 * 10%, it results in:

200 * 10% = 4000

In the scientific mode, the percent sign isn't even available, and typing it in via the keyboard doesn't register.

sonrah said,
Calculator's kinda buggy though. For example, if you do 200 * 10%, it results in:

200 * 10% = 4000

In the scientific mode, the percent sign isn't even available, and typing it in via the keyboard doesn't register.


What did you expect? It's a Beta.

Come on, it's a calculator; even if it's beta, I expect it to work. Furthermore, being beta is not a free ticket for basic functionality being utterly broken and wrong.

sonrah said,
Come on, it's a calculator; even if it's beta, I expect it to work. Furthermore, being beta is not a free ticket for basic functionality being utterly broken and wrong.

i dont think you understand. beta is development code, i.e. it might not be finished. If they waited until everything was finished tested and working, you'd have no beta!

On the current Windows calc, press:
" 200 * 10% " and the screen will show 20.
Press " = " and the result will be 4,000

Sounds like the new one is the same - the correct answer...

Why would you use the % sign in Scientific mode (which also isn't there in the current version)?