Windows 8 business apps getting more attention

As more and more Windows 8 "Modern" apps start appearing for RTM users on the Windows Store, the focus is turning to apps that are made specifically for business users. A number of proof-of-concept business apps have already been made by a company called Sogeti.

In a feature on ZDNet, it reveals that Sogeti has made four concepts for Windows 8-based business apps for US companies, and 10 more apps for European customers. You can check out a video of Sogeti's concepts above. The article states that the developers have mostly used XAML and C#, along with Microsoft's Visual Studio 2012 tools, to create their Windows 8 apps.

Another company making these kinds of apps is C-Labs Software. The team made a home automation monitoring app called See My House. It apparently took C-Labs less than a day to adapt their software over to the "Modern" UI.

However, another company called Laplink has said it won't be porting its applications over to the Modern UI. That's because Microsoft puts in restrictions on how those apps can access files such as the registry in Windows 8. While the company will release a Windows 8 desktop app, Laplink CEO Thomas Koll says, "Our app won't work with Metro. It needs access to everything on a PC."

Source: ZDNet.com

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16 Comments

FoxieFoxie said,
Why cant WP7 apps just upscale?

Different devices have different features, and use different API's. Also, WP7 is based off of the WinCE kernel, while Windows 8 (and WP8 for that matter) use the WinNT kernel.

Ultimately, you'll see a lot of WP8 apps that are upscalled with some minor adjustments for the new screen size, but not as much from WP7 apps.

greenwizard88 said,

Different devices have different features, and use different API's. Also, WP7 is based off of the WinCE kernel, while Windows 8 (and WP8 for that matter) use the WinNT kernel.

Ultimately, you'll see a lot of WP8 apps that are upscalled with some minor adjustments for the new screen size, but not as much from WP7 apps.

That could change with WP8.

~Johnny said,
Frick me that company needs to hire some designers, that was one largely ugly show reel

Seems to me that they started with the Grid App and then just went crazy with colors and layout

If the Windows team actually got a clue about interface design, specifically consistency, maybe they would inspire third-parties to follow suit. Alas that's not the case.

~Johnny said,
Frick me that company needs to hire some designers, that was one largely ugly show reel

the focus is turning to apps that are made specifically for business users

Most businesses don't care about form over function, especially not enough to hire employees dedicated to it. It's not until the average consumer gets ahold of it, does it really matter.

KSib said,


Most businesses don't care about form over function, especially not enough to hire employees dedicated to it. It's not until the average consumer gets ahold of it, does it really matter.


So why are the consumer portions of Windows 8 - metro crap - so fugly?

[quote=KSib said,]


Most businesses don't care about form over function, especially not enough to hire employees dedicated to it. It's not until the average consumer gets ahold of it, does it really matter.[/quote

I sadly have to mostly agree with you... I've been building Windows LOB apps for 13yrs now, though Microsoft is starting to get its sh*t together on the design side the enterprise isn't a place for those looking for beauty. Hopefully that changes in the too distant future..

MetroNative said,
This app wasn't done by the Windows team, please know what you are talking about before posting.

Nowhere did I say that this was developed by the Windows team. Try proper reading before posting.

MS has done it's job by defining a design language, now its up to devs to comply, though visual design isn't generally a function of engineering. The following are good examples but this needs to be the norm:

Consumer:
http://thirteen23.com/projects/blio-windows-8/
http://thirteen23.com/projects/loku/

Business:
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/micr...business-app-concepts/12189

The Office future vision videos shows us where MS wants to go and the new Windows Runtime (WinRt) API and Surface tablets are the FIRST step to getting them there. From an app dev perspective anyway..

MetroNative said,
MS has done it's job by defining a design language, now its up to devs to comply

Microsoft haven't really kept to the design language themselves (the time I realised this is the time I lost all interest in 8). Could spend hours picking apart the language but all you need to look at to understand this is how many variations there are across their own apps.

They have to lead by example first. Microsoft doesn't care how inconsistent the UI is so why should anyone else? Been a problem as far back as I can remember.

Fourjays said,

Microsoft haven't really kept to the design language themselves (the time I realised this is the time I lost all interest in 8). Could spend hours picking apart the language but all you need to look at to understand this is how many variations there are across their own apps.

They have to lead by example first. Microsoft doesn't care how inconsistent the UI is so why should anyone else? Been a problem as far back as I can remember.

They are guilty of not leading by example in the past, that has changed with Windows 8. Are they herding the masses of devs by strict enforcement? No, how could they effectively anyway, devs, designers and project managers will do what they want anyway. All I'm saying is that they've done more than the bare minimum here. Its up to devs, designers and us to keep moving apps to the state-of-the art.

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