Windows 8 features for businesses explained

The Windows 8 Consumer Preview edition that was released last week isn't just for PC tech enthusiasts, at least according to Microsoft. In a new entry on the Windows For Your Business blog, Microsoft's Erwin Visser talks about how businesses can also benefit from checking out the Consumer Preview version.

One of the new features of Windows 8 is Windows To Go, a way for employees to take their corporate Windows 8 PC and store it on an external USB drive so they can run Windows 8 on almost any PC anywhere in the world. As Visser states:

It’s like having your secure corporate PC in your pocket. And this means employees will be able to do things like travel light without sacrificing productivity, IT organizations can support the “Bring Your Own PC” trend, and businesses can give contingent staff access to the corporate environment without compromising security.


Another Windows 8 feature that businesses can use is Trusted Boot which checks for malware and viruses throughout the PC booting process. Visser also talks about the Virtual Desktop Infrastructures for thin client machines in the workplace. Visser states:

With Windows 8, VDI is reimagined to offer more and address those concerns. Users will be able to get a virtualized experience that feels like a rich client experience, with things like high-definition graphics fully responsive to touch, along with high performance and support for local USB devices.


More information about Windows 8 and its uses in the business world can be found in a new Microsoft press release which also reports that Kevin Turner, chief operating officer at Microsoft, gave a keynote address on this subject today at the CeBIT trade show.

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18 Comments

A cool feature but selling Windows 8 as a whole to enterprise users is going to be one of the hardest tasks Microsoft has ever faced.

thealexweb said,
A cool feature but selling Windows 8 as a whole to enterprise users is going to be one of the hardest tasks Microsoft has ever faced.

Actually, don't be surprise if you hear some enterprise businesses out there jump to Windows 8. Microsoft allows their enterprise customers (IT department) see, evaluate, and debug Windows.

There is no selling point for Business and Microsoft knows that. However it is not end of world because Windows 7 will take over Windows XP by a lot. Windows 8 aims Tablets and Phones and of course whoever decides to run it on Desktop. Windows 9 is going to be interesting new step.

techguy77 said,
There is no selling point for Business and Microsoft knows that. However it is not end of world because Windows 7 will take over Windows XP by a lot. Windows 8 aims Tablets and Phones and of course whoever decides to run it on Desktop. Windows 9 is going to be interesting new step.

Maybe we'll be left in a Gingerbread (Windows 7) and Honeycomb (Windows 8) sort of situation were it can all be brought together with Windows 9 (Ice Cream Sandwich).

techguy77 said,
There is no selling point for Business and Microsoft knows that. However it is not end of world because Windows 7 will take over Windows XP by a lot. Windows 8 aims Tablets and Phones and of course whoever decides to run it on Desktop. Windows 9 is going to be interesting new step.

Makes sense. Once everyone gets used to Windows 7, maybe by Win 10, they'll make the transition over to Win8.

dagamer34 said,

I would hope it's password-encrypted.

Yes it is, at a level even the FBI and CIA expressed concern over, because of the time and computing power required to break into the content.

They don't have a billion years to dedicate to decrypting MS volume level encryption.

Jose_49 said,
I wonder what would happen if one happen to lose the usb drive...

Nothing.
Other OSes do not have access to the drive, it's only usable as a playready boot device.
Sure the drive could be wiped and used for data, but the image will not be usable by third parties.

Refresh and Reset will cut down on time, effort, and support costs in a major way alone. The people here who can't see that either don't work in an enterprise or have never had to wipe/reload/swap a desktop and reload a users preferences/settings before. Add the support for a private store with sharepoint and a slew of new metro apps that can be purchased and deployed from a consumer POV and you could have a strong case for Enterprise deployment. I'm not forgetting that there is some difference in UX, but after using it for almost a week exclusively in both a desktop, laptop, and tablet experience, I can say that all of the functionality is there. In my multimonitor desktop system, I have pinned my frequently used apps on the taskbar and all of my desktop items I need on a separate monitor. The metro interface runs on its own monitor and works well. Give it a shot and don't be afraid to learn something new. I do have some criticism about the steps it takes to get to things in metro, but a majority of things are easy and work well. Try it before you judge.

Drewidian said,
Refresh and Reset will cut down on time, effort, and support costs in a major way alone. The people here who can't see that either don't work in an enterprise or have never had to wipe/reload/swap a desktop and reload a users preferences/settings before. Add the support for a private store with sharepoint and a slew of new metro apps that can be purchased and deployed from a consumer POV and you could have a strong case for Enterprise deployment. I'm not forgetting that there is some difference in UX, but after using it for almost a week exclusively in both a desktop, laptop, and tablet experience, I can say that all of the functionality is there. In my multimonitor desktop system, I have pinned my frequently used apps on the taskbar and all of my desktop items I need on a separate monitor. The metro interface runs on its own monitor and works well. Give it a shot and don't be afraid to learn something new. I do have some criticism about the steps it takes to get to things in metro, but a majority of things are easy and work well. Try it before you judge.

I have been in "desktop" only for a few days on my laptop. I only use metro if I want to use it. I find it pretty good.

Metro is perfect for business because you wont get distracted by other apps in windows around or behind the spreadsheet that you should be concentrating on.

I've been using Win8CP since release last week and I do a lot of enterprise hardware and software evaluations. This OS release is just the beginning of an ideal blend between work and play.

In Windows 9, they would surely allow your log-in to be bound to a corporate domain (classic), a windows live account (federated), or even a google apps for domains (hosted federation) whereby you would simply go to the log-in screen and switch experiences. This way your machine is not restricted to bound-to-domain-or-not. Any device would suffice and would automatically load your profile settings worldwide.

Anyway, it's great stuff and very big leaps in the right direction.

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