Windows 8 is "one of the best things" ever for Intel, says CEO

Windows 8 has a lot riding on its virtual shoulders. Its success or failure will mean a lot not just for its creators at Microsoft but for one of Windows 8's biggest cheerleaders Intel. News.com reports that during the Credit Suisse technology conference on Tuesday, Intel's CEO Paul Otellini was highly optimistic about the prospects for Windows 8, saying, "I think it’s one of the best things that’s ever happened to our company."

He added that Intel felt that Windows 8 was not just a "very good operating system" for the PC market but also for the growing tablet market. Otellini said that Windows 8 " ... will allow tablets to really get a legitimacy into mainstream computing, particularly in enterprises that they don’t have today. A lot of the enterprise managers are worried about security, they’re worried about the difficulty affording their legacy applications over to an Android tablet or to an iPad. What Microsoft is doing is making that seamless for them."

Windows 8 will be able to run via its classic interface along with the new Metro-style tile interface that's being designed specifically with touch screens in mind. Otellini said, " ... So this gives us, x86, in particular, I think a unique advantage as Windows 8 comes to market, because we can take advantage of all the legacy that was ever written, and all of the fact that all the drivers for the mice and for printers and every other USB device in the world."

Otellini also talked about other subjects in his address to the technology conference. He said that PCs were not dying, claiming that interest in PCs in other parts of the world such as China, Brazil and India is growing as that country's middle class also grows and buys PCs. He also continued to push Intel's Ultrabook concept. The thin-and-light notebook design, which officially launched last month, is all about making, " ... thinner, sleeker, faster, more responsive PCs, longer battery life, more secure, but also at a mainstream price point," according to Otellini.

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smooth3006 said,
Metro has got to go!

Ya, all the design awards and usability awards it has gotten is just bad, and it must die because smooth3006 is either God or not bright enough to actually give it a try.

WP7 seems to be popular with its user base, with a higher percentage of them liking Metro than iPhone users like iOS's interface...

paul otellini is either high on drugs, or suffering from delusion of grandeur. why is he sucking up to microsoft. i have NEVER see any intel ceo does that. just got to show how pathetically bad the situation is for intel.

Albert said,
paul otellini is either high on drugs, or suffering from delusion of grandeur. why is he sucking up to microsoft. i have NEVER see any intel ceo does that. just got to show how pathetically bad the situation is for intel.

Really? Have you considered that Intel ALSO wants to make non-x86 processors, like they tried with the Itanium and other designs over the years?

So they can continue x86 processors and make money, and they can unleash non-x86 technologies they have and Windows 8 will also run on them and make Intel money. (As the ARM Windows 8 market will push more developers to build using HTML5 and .NET that are architectural agnostic, meaning less x86 dependency and it can finally die.)

Win-Win for Intel...

Intel is not stupid and they know how to make non-x86 processors and when not limited by the x86 compatibility, they might know how to make some incredible things.

As long as they can get a nice processor that's easy on batteries, I would be glad to use an Intel tablet with Windows 8.

Intel's sales depend on Microsoft and Windows, so it's not surprising that he's hyping the platform. If it fails, Intel will face a slow decline along with the PC market as ARM tablets replace it.

Coi said,
Yeah, tablets are definitely going to replace all PC's.
the will replace it for most people yes... think of the number of freinds/family/realitives that only need a tablets abilities.. heck i am a big computer guy too but if I could switch to the Ipad for 99% of everything i do, and the other 1 % is stuff i shouldnt be doing anyways lol

Joey S said,
If it fails, Intel will face a slow decline along with the PC market as ARM tablets replace it.

Except it won't be ARM tablets runing Windows. Everyone hates metro remember, so if they turn metro off, their tablets become useless, unless win32 application developers port their solutions to ARM.

After the rumor (being posted in the forum as a news) that AMD has dropped their faith within the Desktop market, I wouldn't know why Intel wasn't going to be happy.

I can understand this. If they can't be in the phone market with MeeGo, then at least they can be in the growing tablet market. (But I really like what MS are doing with tablets, where you can dock them into a keyboard and mouse and they become a desktop.)

Meph said,
I can understand this. If they can't be in the phone market with MeeGo, then at least they can be in the growing tablet market. (But I really like what MS are doing with tablets, where you can dock them into a keyboard and mouse and they become a desktop.)

I wonder if windows 8 will give Intel a chance to enter the cell phone market when windows phone 8 is coming out. Could happen in a few years.

It may be the best thing ever for Intel and Microsoft, locking users into their Apple-like walled garden, but I'm worried that it's shaping up to be the worst thing ever for end users who want to use their PCs for anything serious.

Matt Sharpe said,
It may be the best thing ever for Intel and Microsoft, locking users into their Apple-like walled garden, but I'm worried that it's shaping up to be the worst thing ever for end users who want to use their PCs for anything serious.

Why? You can still do virtually everything on Windows 8 that you can on Windows 7 - including running normal programs downloaded from anywhere on the web. All they've done is add an additional layer - not take away.

Matt Sharpe said,
It may be the best thing ever for Intel and Microsoft, locking users into their Apple-like walled garden, but I'm worried that it's shaping up to be the worst thing ever for end users who want to use their PCs for anything serious.

What...?

Matt Sharpe said,
It may be the best thing ever for Intel and Microsoft, locking users into their Apple-like walled garden, but I'm worried that it's shaping up to be the worst thing ever for end users who want to use their PCs for anything serious.

Are you serious??? I guess you don't know much about Windows 8?!

~Johnny said,

Why? You can still do virtually everything on Windows 8 that you can on Windows 7 - including running normal programs downloaded from anywhere on the web. All they've done is add an additional layer - not take away.

Yes, another layer. Just add another layer to the OS to make it better! Thats all it was missing all along, it just needed another layer. If only Bill Gates had realized right up front that you don't need a stylus, you just need another layer.

derekaw said,

Yes, another layer. Just add another layer to the OS to make it better! Thats all it was missing all along, it just needed another layer. If only Bill Gates had realized right up front that you don't need a stylus, you just need another layer.

Layers are the key to why Windows is light and extensible...

However, on to the point, the fact that users and the world basically 'believes' that a Stylus is NOT necessary or USEFUL is a sad state of where Apple has mislead people because they lacked any serious Stylus UI capabilities.

As the world moves on to Windows 8, and are using BOTH touch and a Stylus, they will think back to the iPad and go, wow, Apple missed the boat by not letting us draw and do handwriting and pressure sensitive input, etc... This will be when people wake up to the insanity Apple has created.

Today I see actual 'artists' talking about using iPads and finger painting like it somehow 'better' than using a Stylus along with Touch for drawing and painting... This is when you know people have bought the con.

As for the stylus without 'touch' on the TabletPC from 10 years ago, the was a reason this wasn't common then. COST. Even the digitizer technology then, that was cheap, was freaking expensive. Apple jumps into the iPad market around the same time the cost of larger touch screen technologies become affordable, and Apple puts in the 'cheapest' technology they can, avoid the more expensive 'digitizer' class touch screen technologies that can sense pressure and use a stylus.

With the big irony being that Apple was mainly 'cheap' and they also couldn't use the more advanced digitizer techologies as they couldn't do handwriting well on OS X or iOS, so they told people they didn't need a Stylus.

So really what is better... Multi-Touch + Stylus with highly accurate input and pressure and tilt and angle input. or like the iPad, just Multi-Touch? See how silly this makes the argument against Styluses sound?

Windows 8 may be the thing that ''ever happened'' to a lot of companies. Microsoft's OEMs, software-makers and etc.

Non-iPad tablets may finally start selling well.

FMH said,
Windows 8 may be the thing that ''ever happened'' to a lot of companies. Microsoft's OEMs, software-makers and etc.

Non-iPad tablets may finally start selling well.

Oops, forgot to add the word 'best'. It doesn't make any sense without it, but I got 3 'likes' anyway!

Northgrove said,
Tablets already have legitimacy in many corporate environments today. But yes, it'll be good to see more competition here.

Not tablets, iPads.

KingCrimson said,

Not tablets, iPads.

Actually TabletPCs are used far more than people realize. Name the biggest companies around the world, and they all have employees using TabletPCs in various areas of work.

The iPad is not 'accepted' in the enterprise world because of the security risk it adds and the lack of control and policies that companies need to manage employee devices, thus Windows 7 Tablets are out there, and the iPads are being used more as a stop gap, until a real solution arrives that has centralized policies, management, and proven security like Windows.

It may finally make Windows suitable for mainstream tablets but Intel, don't count on them all using your x86 chips, a large chunk of Windows 8 tablets will probably use ARM.

If people care about running legacy x86 apps, they'll buy x86 tablets. I think that it's going to be an uphill battle for ARM for a while.

Aaron44126 said,
If people care about running legacy x86 apps, they'll buy x86 tablets. I think that it's going to be an uphill battle for ARM for a while.

Most businesses use web apps now, which can be run in any browser regardless of processor architecture. Besides, people can run legacy apps on Windows 7 tablets right now, yet no one's buying them.

Joey S said,

Most businesses use web apps now, which can be run in any browser regardless of processor architecture. Besides, people can run legacy apps on Windows 7 tablets right now, yet no one's buying them.

A lot of business is still trying to move to Web apps, but the majority use local solutions that are x86 native.

This the point Intel and Microsoft both are making though, as Windows 8 allows businesses to continue moving forward to .NET and Web Apps that are not x86 bound, and also keep using the x86 solutions and software they have today. Think large company with some users with ARM Windows 8 tablets using the newer software, and some users with x86 tablets using the older software.


Intel's mobile processing and battery usage is getting better, and is already close to ARM in high end situations. A netbook/tablet today with an Atom Processor can run circles around an comperable ARM based device, and battery life is over 75% of the ARM device, which isn't bad considering the power difference. Intel's biggest problem is in the standby portion, as they can't monitoring for incoming celluar packets full time without being too 'awake' and consuming a lot more power right now.


The other thing this gives Intel that I dont' think the world is considering, is the option to get away from x86-64 that they have been wanting to do for a long time in the consumer/business PC sector. Intel tried Itanium and have had a lot of other technologies that are not x86 compatible. This gives them the chance to build a new CPU architecture technology without any ties to x86 and be like ARM with no x86 compatibility or 'limitations', and produce a new generation of CPUs that Windows will run just fine on, and with the shift in moving developers to .NET and other development technologies that are architecturally agnostic, it can be something rather spectacular for Intel and AMD as well as ARM technologies.

Ian really excited for Windows 8 as well. Imagine a tablet computer with the list of "apps" that windows supports!

Ently said,
Ian really excited for Windows 8 as well. Imagine a tablet computer with the list of "apps" that windows supports!

Oops thats meant to say I am really excited... damn auto correction! Also why can't you edit posts on mobile neowin?

Ently said,

Oops thats meant to say I am really excited... damn auto correction! Also why can't you edit posts on mobile neowin?

I can't edit posts on neowin period now! And I'm on a desktop system

х.iso said,

then check this out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrA9UvZtRFA
and these kind of tablets been around for looong time now

I imagine Ently would be aware of that. I think it's more the point that Windows 8 will include a tablet interface, so it can be used like an iPad for most activities, but still be able to run all the normal Windows programs and work with the same devices.

Mikeyx11 said,

I imagine Ently would be aware of that. I think it's more the point that Windows 8 will include a tablet interface, so it can be used like an iPad for most activities, but still be able to run all the normal Windows programs and work with the same devices.

Bingo!