Windows 8 Kiosk mode pictured, detailed

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We have seen Kiosk mode references previously, but with the new leak of 9374, we have a better look at what the feature actually offers and may bring to Windows 8.1 when it is released later this year, possibly in August.

Kiosk mode, as the name implies, will likely be used for Kiosks as the settings allow you to lock down an account and limit the functionally of the platform. Additionally, you can set the machine to run an app on login which would be ideal for demos and in-store kiosks for customers to interact with merchandise.

The Kiosk mode will certainly be a welcomed addition to the platform for the enterprise side of the equation as this makes Windows 8 easier to deploy, out of the box, in the retail and corporate environments. 

Microsoft is expected to release a preview build of the platform in late June as part of its upcoming BUILD conference with the RTM release coming sometime in the late summer season.

Thanks for the tip Robert!

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Just as an FYI but Kiosk Mode has been around since Vista. It's discoverability was a bit less since it was a group policy. I've been using it for quite while on my media center for XBMC.

People who complain about Windows 8 have never really put any effort into trying to use it. They just jump on the hate windows 8 bandwagon because they see other clueless people complain about it.

I think it's time people should realize using a computer takes a little effort and time. And with ever increasing speed of development in tech, we need to put more effort in teaching ourself how to work with this tech.

Yesterday I was called by someone I know who had a problem with his Windows XP7. So I asked him: "Win XP or Win7?" Him: "Yes Windows XP7".......
Just told him I didn't have the time at that point..... Completely clueless of what he was using.

You can't drive a car without training, you can't use a computer without some training.
Yes, some stuff - could- be intuitive for some, but most of them have -no- clue at all.

Some fair a little better with OSX, but still don't truly understand what the computer can or cannot do. With tablets it's slightly less complex, as there is less to do with. So it becomes simpler, but not for all.
I've seen people fumble with an iPad for days, and still don't master the basics, as -again- some stuff isn't intuitive.

It always amazes me people can learn to use a smartphone, a iOS/Win/Android tablet in no time, but keep bitching at their computer because they 'don't understand what just happened', but refuse to dive into the matter why this happended. If their Twitter or Whatsapp failed, they'll be all over it, but the pc/laptop: bitch.....

Take my start button, please. /ba da bing
I take my start button everywhere, but it always finds it's way back to neowin comment threads. *cheers*
I love this crowd!

A lot persons have asked for something like this. Kudos. Just put the taskbar and Start menu back. Make the Taskbar be always on screen.

This is awesome for businesses. Paint picker at home depot, help kiosks at malls,ticket printers at theatres,and so on. You've got USB so you can connect many peripherals. You just write an app and hardware is readily available. No more paying big bucks to companies for their proprietary expensive machines.

vcfan said,
This is awesome for businesses. Paint picker at home depot, help kiosks at malls,ticket printers at theatres,and so on. You've got USB so you can connect many peripherals. You just write an app and hardware is readily available. No more paying big bucks to companies for their proprietary expensive machines.

...they've been doing this for ages? Most of those "proprietary expensive machines" you're talking about are just boxes with a normal computer inside running Windows XP or something. And for kiosks, they will continue to use those type of boxes to hide the guts and integrated peripherals.

An alarming tendency people have come to accept - to lock down everything. Sure, the iPad generation needs everything spoon-fed.

So if you own a store and a system used by customers to assist them with shopping for instance, and all they require is access to a single app, you'd be happy to let them do whatever they want with the system, potentially screwing it up?

Sure, okay. That makes total sense. I'm sure you'd be all for adding a keyboard and mouse to ATMs so people can go web browsing and play Angry Birds instead of use it what it's meant for.

Uhm, I havent generally visited computer shops in other countries much.
But here the computers on display just get flashed completely with a default image every reboot. Don't have to worry about anyone screwing anything up, all effects and changes will be gone when you reboot.

Shadowzz said,
Uhm, I havent generally visited computer shops in other countries much.
But here the computers on display just get flashed completely with a default image every reboot. Don't have to worry about anyone screwing anything up, all effects and changes will be gone when you reboot.

No, not computers on display for sale... computers on display to display information. You know. Kiosks. The entire point is that only one program is to be run. You absolutely don't want users exiting out of that program and messing up the system.

Like airport check-in kiosks. This is a great feature, not something to complain about.

Phouchg said,
I wouldn't buy friggin' full blown Windows computer to run a single very specific program.

But a number of businesses will, it's for them. Windows isn't just for desktops, way before metro even it's been used in lots of different point of sale systems. Those run one app and nothing else.

I'd advise these businesses to strongly consider a number of thin clients and a virtualization server instead. It is an insane way of literally burning money to buy a Windows licence for a thin client, especially for businesses.

Phouchg said,
I wouldn't buy friggin' full blown Windows computer to run a single very specific program.

Nobody said anything about a full-blown Windows computer. And even if they did, why not? Businesses do it all the friggin' time for many obvious reasons (read below)

Phouchg said,
I'd advise these businesses to strongly consider a number of thin clients and a virtualization server instead. It is an insane way of literally burning money to buy a Windows licence for a thin client, especially for businesses.

You'd make a very poor adviser.

I hope you realize that even if using a thin-client/virtualization server, you still need an operating system. You know, like Windows 8 - where Kiosk mode would still be used.

Also, using thin-clients would only make sense if a particular business had a large number of such kiosks. If they only have one, a couple, or a small few (which would usually be the case), a "full-blown" Windows system would make perfect sense. Most kiosks are actually complete Windows systems.

And when you consider that kiosk-like machines may only require the power of a cheap netbook, a "full-blown" system as you call it may only cost like $150-200 for the computer hardware anyway. It's not exactly burning money, lol.

So you're saying these businesses should use Linux or something to run their Windows/Metro-based kiosk apps? lol. Alrighty then...

Phouchg said,
Because recommending open-source and free software makes a poor adviser.

So you're saying these businesses should use Linux or something to run their Windows/Metro-based kiosk apps? lol. Alrighty then...

I wouldn't trust Microsoft not to pull the rug from under our feet with Metro is all.
As far as C#/.NET goes - it's quite portable.
Thing is - any s*tstained IT student can make a misdesigned, counterproductive, uninspired Metro app just by freeloading VS2012 off the nets. Design and code professionals will ask for their cut that will outweight Windows licences. However, you'll have a secure and stable product. A thing uncommon these days.

Phouchg said,
I wouldn't trust Microsoft not to pull the rug from under our feet with Metro is all.
As far as C#/.NET goes - it's quite portable.
Thing is - any s*tstained IT student can make a misdesigned, counterproductive, uninspired Metro app just by freeloading VS2012 off the nets. Design and code professionals will ask for their cut that will outweight Windows licences. However, you'll have a secure and stable product. A thing uncommon these days.

Even if they pulled Metro, it will still continue to work.

Of course it's easy to create a Metro app - but I imagine that a business wanting an app for a kiosk isn't going to find some random IT student to develop it for them so I don't think that's going to be an issue.

Developing for Metro is going to be much cheaper and quicker than developing for OSS, even if you take into account the costs of Windows licences required to operate it. There's also no reason for it to be unstable or insecure if developed properly and stability and security are also issues which can affect OSS too.

Could I use Group Policy to disable all of the Metro stuff (as well as the "charms") and enable a normal functioning Start menu? If not, this doesn't really help me much.

Oh, wow, really? What about working on important things instead? Like, for instance, presentation of the product? So they actually sell? You come to the shop and want to try RT or W8 tablet? Sure, you can... see the login screen. That's all you can usually see. When I ask personnel to log in, it's not much better. Anything that needs live account doesn't work = almost everything important that makes the W8 stand out, doesn't work. I know what stands out, but average customer doesn't. What's the point? The price of those tablets is quite high. I am a big fan of WP and W8 on tablets. I would really love to see them flourish. But the presentation is nonexistent. How could they think that some average guy looking for a tablet will come to the store and buy W8 tablet, based on what they can't see? They will not. This needs to change. MS is still trying so hard to sell their tablet idea, but still struggling at the most basic level... for Christ sake, show me what that thing can do, finally!

blackdaemon said,
Anything that needs live account doesn't work = almost everything important that makes the W8 stand out, doesn't work

Wasn't that already an issue with WP7? IMHO WP7/8 and W8 only makes sense/starts to become great once you see how your personal content gets integrated via LiveID...

mikeyx12 said,

You = / = All

Unless he's referring to people who are currently unhappy with Windows 8 because of said lacking feature.

Which is quite a lot actually. I say this as someone who tries to sell someone on Windows 8 on a daily basis. Some people love it, like today I blew a guys mind with it. Others... not so much.

dead.cell said,

Unless he's referring to people who are currently unhappy with Windows 8 because of said lacking feature.

Which is quite a lot actually. I say this as someone who tries to sell someone on Windows 8 on a daily basis. Some people love it, like today I blew a guys mind with it. Others... not so much.

Circuitspark referred only to himself and being happy, so I don't know how you came to the conclusion he could be referring to anything else, lol.

So? First, ChomeOS was not mentioned in the article, so why did you need to bring it up? Second, with ChomeOS's low market share, it is not like anyone will ever see it.

This is not true. Yes, it's true that Chrome has a market penetration of only 0.035%, a truly appalling stat for a product that's been on the market for over 2 years. But these numbers don't take into consideration Chrome users here in China. If you add in the Chinese users, Chrome's market penetration leaps to 0.0352%

"__________ is available on the beta version of Chrome OS"
Contact the press, Google's implementing a new feature that we should ditch Windows for.

SoylentG said,
So? First, ChomeOS was not mentioned in the article, so why did you need to bring it up? Second, with ChomeOS's low market share, it is not like anyone will ever see it.

Wow, calm your tits. He's just saying. Jeez.

Wow, calm your tits. He's just saying. Jeez

I think everyone's calm but you ironically. But curious, why must we 'just say' these things in MS threads? When the ipod came out, it was not necessary to spam that it was not the first portable mp3 player. when Linux got an NTFS driver, it was not necessary to and generally never done (as far as I've seen) to 'just say', "Windows had that for agez! LOL!" etc.

I agree with you, however those aren't comparable to this, lol.

In this case, both operating systems would be getting a similar feature at about the same time. It's more than fair to bring that up.

He didn't say "Chrome OS has had that for ages!" or anything along those lines.

For example, say the iPhone gets NFC. Someone points out that a particular Samsung phone is also getting NFC at the same time. You're saying that comment would be basically irrelevant? lol. Not at all.

In the other post with the video demonstration of this build, he tried the kiosk mode and it was only for Metro apps, no desktop was visible.

rfirth said,
"Select app to automatically launch on login"

Is desktop an option? I don't want it, but... you know. Some do.

I don't think that's quite how it works. It's not merely there to launch an app on startup.

The desktop is just an app in Metro now, so it might do more harm than good.

What if the desktop is the only thing you can run, and not desktop apps.
The kiosk mode is one-app-only, so this might translate to the desktop as well, and that could be why it's missing in the list....

Its actually not an app. Metro just shows it as one. Meaning to say that if you close the desktop app, all it does it remove the reference. Everything on the desktop including open windows stay the same.

an even greater feature for stores to show off the awesomeness of apps. Imagine a table of 4 Surfaces or other windows 8 hybrid devices. One is locked to the settings, one is locked to a game, another to an app, and the last perhaps to the camera app.

It makes it very easy to market in-store

When I am shopping for a computer, I want to check out the features, not be locked into 1 app. But to each their own. I'm not going to shell out upwards of $1000 bucks for a product and not be able to see what it can do. In person and not by watching YouTube vids.

When you take a car for a test drive, do you just sit in the front seat, or do you actually start it up and drive for a while?

COKid said,
When I am shopping for a computer, I want to check out the features, not be locked into 1 app. But to each their own. I'm not going to shell out upwards of $1000 bucks for a product and not be able to see what it can do. In person and not by watching YouTube vids.

When you take a car for a test drive, do you just sit in the front seat, or do you actually start it up and drive for a while?

The world isn't black and white, my friend. Stores will not be using this for every one of their show-and-tell devices.

This is merely *one* way to control the experience/message that's being delivered to the consumer.

Some people don't know what to do when they're just given a start screen. They don't know where to find things. This feature helps folks focus on one aspect of windows 8.

COKid said,
When I am shopping for a computer, I want to check out the features, not be locked into 1 app. But to each their own. I'm not going to shell out upwards of $1000 bucks for a product and not be able to see what it can do. In person and not by watching YouTube vids.

When you take a car for a test drive, do you just sit in the front seat, or do you actually start it up and drive for a while?

I think you need to work a little bit at those analogies.

COKid said,
When I am shopping for a computer, I want to check out the features, not be locked into 1 app. But to each their own. I'm not going to shell out upwards of $1000 bucks for a product and not be able to see what it can do. In person and not by watching YouTube vids.

When you take a car for a test drive, do you just sit in the front seat, or do you actually start it up and drive for a while?

It's meant for businesses who want to use tablets to demonstrate content, not for in Best Buy.

COKid said,
When I am shopping for a computer, I want to check out the features, not be locked into 1 app. But to each their own. I'm not going to shell out upwards of $1000 bucks for a product and not be able to see what it can do. In person and not by watching YouTube vids.

When you take a car for a test drive, do you just sit in the front seat, or do you actually start it up and drive for a while?

Somehow, you have completely and absolutely missed the entire point of Kiosk mode. lol.