Windows 8 latest build number revealed

Microsoft is scheduled to release the Release Preview version of Windows 8 sometime in the first week of June, or about five weeks from now. Even though we have a new timetable for the next public version of Windows 8, it looks like the company is still internally testing release candidate builds for the Release Preview. The reliable Windows 8-themed site Winunleaked.tk reports that the version number for the latest internal build for Windows 8 has been updated yet again.

According to the site's Windows 8 builds list, the latest build number for the Consumer Preview release candidate is officially called 8328.0.winmain.120420-1909. By contrast, we had previously reported that the final build number for the public release of the Consumer Preview was 8250.

There's no word yet what the build number for the final public Release Preview version of Windows 8 might turn out to be.

Microsoft has yet to reveal if it will hold a press event for the launch of the Release Preview version of Windows 8 like they did with the Consumer Preview version, which was held at the Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona, Spain on February 29th. There are two major trade shows being held the same week as the Release Preview timetable. One is the Computex PC trade show in Taipei. The other is the E3 video and PC game trade show in LA where Microsoft has already confirmed it will be holding an Xbox 360 press event on Monday, June 4. We will be at E3 to report on the press event live.

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Well that is the latest build number they know of, there are builds daily, so technically the latest build is going to be higher then the one listed above.

xendrome said,
Well that is the latest build number they know of, there are builds daily, so technically the latest build is going to be higher then the one listed above.

I think it's already at 8330, saw a twitter post yesterday from Canouna. Anyways, build numbers aside we have no new info so far.

GP007 said,

I think it's already at 8330, saw a twitter post yesterday from Canouna. Anyways, build numbers aside we have no new info so far.

I don't know about you, but I kinda don't want to be spoiled.

laserfloyd said,

Yep. It's definitely gone in the latest build. They finally listened to you.

/s

Yep. I heard AERO is gone too, and that the Classic Windows 95 shell is the default.

Dot Matrix said,

Yep. I heard AERO is gone too, and that the Classic Windows 95 shell is the default.

All steps in the right direction but I won't be happy until they bring clock.exe back.

JamesWeb said,
All steps in the right direction but I won't be happy until they bring clock.exe back.

Still missing Program Manager...

tomcoleman said,
hopefully metro stripped out

It would be nice if they did. If so, why hasn't Microsoft make that a "big news" item?? Their silence is not reassuring. But fear not, Windows-7 will be around for a long time and will work just fine.

TsarNikky said,

It would be nice if they did. If so, why hasn't Microsoft make that a "big news" item?? Their silence is not reassuring. But fear not, Windows-7 will be around for a long time and will work just fine.

Hahahahaha. It's been said over, and over, and over again that Metro will be in ALL versions of Windows 8.

No Dot Matrix, you have it all wrong. Are you blind or something? They stripped out all of the GUI elements and made it strictly a command line OS with an option to add a GUI on top. They said they wanted to get back to the Windows 3.1 days. /end sarcasm

:-)

nytiger73 said,
They stripped out all of the GUI elements and made it strictly a command line OS with an option to add a GUI on top. They said they wanted to get back to the Windows 3.1 days. /end sarcasm

Sarcasm or not...

- Metro implements a tiling window manager, as did Windows 1
- the Metro PDF reader for example has no GUI by default (only appears on right-click), and currently has no GUI for zooming at all
- in a lot of places you have to KNOW what to do because there is no discoverable button, similar to a command line where you have to KNOW the command

So there's more truth to your statement than you might have thought...

CJEric said,

So there's more truth to your statement than you might have thought...

To be fair, I think anyone who ends a comment with "/end sarcasm" doesn't really know what they're talking about.

CJEric said,

Sarcasm or not...

- Metro implements a tiling window manager, as did Windows 1


And so does the other major operating system. The icons are static, and the "tiles" are not as packed in as closely as on Win8, but people of that other OS seem to like it. Also, the other OS now supports full screen mode, and people seem to have no problems with it.

- the Metro PDF reader for example has no GUI by default (only appears on right-click), and currently has no GUI for zooming at all

Swipe up from the bottom if using a touch screen, or simply right click. Isn't it interesting how people whine and complain about the ribbon, taking up so much space, it is confusing, clutters the UI, etc. So Microsoft hides the ribbon by default in desktop apps, and hides the "ribbon" in Metro apps, and now it is too confusing, hard to find, etc.

- in a lot of places you have to KNOW what to do because there is no discoverable button, similar to a command line where you have to KNOW the command

So I am looking at a desktop app, and I see groups of text, and pretty pictures. How do I know which ones I can click, which ones I cannot? What is the difference between desktop apps and Metro? A tool tip? Yep, Metro has that. A change in the UI when hovering over a desktop app item? Not always. The competition has been talking about how great the UI is on competing tablets, and so using a touch screen device with Win8 is no different than the competition, which apparently has been doing quite well. But with Win8 hook up a mouse (even on a tablet), and you got tool tips just by moving the pointer over the UI element. Using the touch screen, tap and hold for a second and you get a tool tip.

Sounds to me like you have not used Win8, because what you have written about is simply not true.

nohone said,

And so does the other major operating system. The icons are static, and the "tiles" are not as packed in as closely as on Win8, but people of that other OS seem to like it. Also, the other OS now supports full screen mode, and people seem to have no problems with it.

Huh?! think you're misunderstanding what a "tiling window manager" is. And the problem is not the existence of a full-screen mode, but the fact that Metro style apps don't allow for overlapping windows at all(just like Windows 1), even on a 30" screen. Note that I'm strictly talking about the Metro 'experience' (as MS likes to call it) here. And what does 'the other OS' have to do with this?!

nohone said,

Swipe up from the bottom if using a touch screen, or simply right click. Isn't it interesting how people whine and complain about the ribbon, taking up so much space, it is confusing, clutters the UI, etc. So Microsoft hides the ribbon by default in desktop apps, and hides the "ribbon" in Metro apps, and now it is too confusing, hard to find, etc.

What's so interesting about that? There's a middle ground between the ribbon and having no visible UI whatsoever.

nohone said,

So I am looking at a desktop app, and I see groups of text, and pretty pictures. How do I know which ones I can click, which ones I cannot? What is the difference between desktop apps and Metro?

Look up 'affordances'. Then think about the difference between visible close button a visible start button, a visible task bar and how in contrast to that Metro style apps work on non-touch devices.

nohone said,

Sounds to me like you have not used Win8, because what you have written about is simply not true.

You're wrong.

nytiger73 said,
No Dot Matrix, you have it all wrong. Are you blind or something? They stripped out all of the GUI elements and made it strictly a command line OS with an option to add a GUI on top. They said they wanted to get back to the Windows 3.1 days. /end sarcasm

:-)

Linux ?

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