Windows 8 PCs to get anti-bloatware deal from Microsoft Store

The Microsoft Store retail locations have been offering what it calls its "Signature" offer when it sells PCs from other companies. This feature, which has been available for a while now, is designed to eliminate much of the "bloatware" that gets installed on some of the desktops and laptops sold by the bigger PC companies.

Now Computerworld.com is reporting that Microsoft Store locations plan to continue to give the "Signature" treatment to Windows 8 PCs when that OS is released sometime later this year.

All Microsoft Store locations sell Windows PCs from companies such as Dell, HP, Acer, Samsung and Toshiba. The stores pledge to strip down the amount of trial programs and other pre-installed software that is normally offered on PCs. Usually, those programs end up never being used by the owner of the PC and can slow down its performance.

Microsoft offers this program for people who buy the current Windows 7 PCs from its store for free, along with 90 days of phone support. For an extra $99, the support is extended to a year, along with theft protection for your PC as well as other benefits.

Microsoft does install its own programs with its Signature set-up, including a copy of its free Microsoft Security Essentials program. However, Microsoft can also remove those programs by request and even install other programs from rival companies such as Google's Chrome web browser.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

From The Forums: Merging Windows 8 Metro with desktop

Next Story

Two more Kickstarter games complete their campaigns

33 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

People bring me laptops that they just bought complaining that its slow. The first thing I do is uninstall most of the OEM specific software, disable most of the startup programs, set most system services to manual and then if there is a recovery partition i get rid of that too in effort to reclaim the wasted space. If there is enough time to install and tweak some things I do that too and then do a full defragmentation and registry clean/defrag.

netsendjoe said,
People bring me laptops that they just bought complaining that its slow. The first thing I do is uninstall most of the OEM specific software, disable most of the startup programs, set most system services to manual and then if there is a recovery partition i get rid of that too in effort to reclaim the wasted space. If there is enough time to install and tweak some things I do that too and then do a full defragmentation and registry clean/defrag.

remove the recovery partition? really? its a few gigs usually and i havent seen it being 10gb or larger ever. and whats <10gb on todays harddrives? yet it helps allot of people from screwing up their computer without the special need of 'Techs' like you..... just horrible

they really really need to stop the bloatware that comes installed on new PCs. this is the primary reason why my friends thing their computers are slow. 80% of the time, they have no virus or maleware on their systems. it's jsut crap that's been starting up from day one.

But if they remove all the "bloatware" then Windows 8 systems won't be able to play DVDs or Blu-rays. I'm not an expert but I can see that annoying a fair number of casual users.

theyarecomingforyou said,
But if they remove all the "bloatware" then Windows 8 systems won't be able to play DVDs or Blu-rays. I'm not an expert but I can see that annoying a fair number of casual users.

Clean install... VLC Player, problem solved, back on topic, nothing is worse than buying a store computer bringing it home and waiting 15-20 minutes for that first boot because everything has to finish installing / registering... and most come with some BS trial of McAfee

Xerino said,
Clean install... VLC Player, problem solved

I think you're being slightly naive if you're suggesting that most casual users have even heard of VLC, let alone know what it does. VLC is great - and it's always one of the first programs I install - but shipping PCs that don't support DVD or Blu-ray playback will be inconvenient to many casual users, especially when such functionality was previously built into Windows.

theyarecomingforyou said,

I think you're being slightly naive if you're suggesting that most casual users have even heard of VLC, let alone know what it does. VLC is great - and it's always one of the first programs I install - but shipping PCs that don't support DVD or Blu-ray playback will be inconvenient to many casual users, especially when such functionality was previously built into Windows.

huh, almost every homecomputer i encounter has VLC installed, not always used, but they often do have it

theyarecomingforyou said,
But if they remove all the "bloatware" then Windows 8 systems won't be able to play DVDs or Blu-rays. I'm not an expert but I can see that annoying a fair number of casual users.
What are you on about? No one is forcing anyone to buy a "Signature PC". This is for people who don't want or need these stuff. They can buy whatever they need to get DVDs and Blu-rays to play from other places. The choice is there.
theyarecomingforyou said,

I think you're being slightly naive if you're suggesting that most casual users have even heard of VLC, let alone know what it does. VLC is great - and it's always one of the first programs I install - but shipping PCs that don't support DVD or Blu-ray playback will be inconvenient to many casual users, especially when such functionality was previously built into Windows.
I think you're being slightly naive if you think that somehow people are being inconvenienced by stripping away "bloatware". Some people don't want it and this gives them a choice. Casual users can still buy PCs with "bloatware" if they want.

I'll be first in line at the Microsoft Store on launch day to get a Windows 8 Ultimate Edition Signature tablet autographed by Steve Ballmer.

Enron said,
I'll be first in line at the Microsoft Store on launch day to get a Windows 8 Ultimate Edition Signature tablet autographed by Steve Ballmer.

Pro*

I hadn't considered doing a clean install on PC arrival. Always uninstalled the programs individually... That's a lot of time wasted.

drazgoosh said,
I hadn't considered doing a clean install on PC arrival. Always uninstalled the programs individually... That's a lot of time wasted.

since 7 its usually quicker to do a clean install, you know exactly where your at then as well

Companies shouldnt be allowed to do it. Surley its anti competative to install their choice of software. If the companies making the OS are not allowed to bundle extras then the hardware manufacturers shouldnt not be able to either.

I agree, terrible bloat but it helps hardware manufacturers achieve bigger profit margins and probably more competitive prices which is fair enough.

Sucks for users who don't know how to do a clean install but at least this goes someway to helping solve that.

sanke1 said,
Use System Reset/Refresh people. Unless OEMs have corrupted the reset mechanism somehow.

Problem is, with 8, using the System Reset feature, Microsoft allow you to change the image considered default when restoring.
So OEMs can easily change this so even the system restore feature built into 8, will restore the bloatware.

Possession said,

Problem is, with 8, using the System Reset feature, Microsoft allow you to change the image considered default when restoring.
So OEMs can easily change this so even the system restore feature built into 8, will restore the bloatware.

Running from the hot pan and boom.. you fall in the fire.

StevenNT said,

+1

Clean install is always the best way because...sure you can remove the bloatware...but all the little cookies, registry entries, etc could still be on your computer causing slow downs.

texasghost said,

Clean install is always the best way because...sure you can remove the bloatware...but all the little cookies, registry entries, etc could still be on your computer causing slow downs.


its not windows xp anymore, little stuff like reg entries and cookies and what not, dont slow down win7 anymore

I've read this around the web and I've been wondering. after buying your computer and you decide to go get a signature copy from a Microsoft Store what happens to your computer warranty does it still stand or be violated? and if it is violated will Microsoft pick up the slack?

I honestly believe this is a very good move by Microsoft, but where does the warranty stand?

ctrl_alt_delete said,

I honestly believe this is a very good move by Microsoft, but where does the warranty stand?

Usually OEMs only cover for hardware issues during the warranty period, not software

I don't see how it would violate any warranty. The hardware itself has not changed. It's not caused any problems to me when I called HP for hardware support.

You might not get any software support though but who really cares about that when you can usually Google it or post a question here.

ctrl_alt_delete said,
I've read this around the web and I've been wondering. after buying your computer and you decide to go get a signature copy from a Microsoft Store what happens to your computer warranty does it still stand or be violated? and if it is violated will Microsoft pick up the slack?

I honestly believe this is a very good move by Microsoft, but where does the warranty stand?


There's nothing to violate. The warranty doesn't state that you need to leave the bloatware installed in order to return it.

The warranties, as it_freakDude said, only cover hardware. You could format the drive and leave it blank and they'd still have to support the hardware.

Thank God, I always perform a clean install when buying a new Computer because often it's quicker than removing the bloat.

McKay said,
Thank God, I always perform a clean install when buying a new Computer because often it's quicker than removing the bloat.

And results in a better experience too since you cant always get all the crap completely off without serious work sometimes.