Windows 8 team members talk about their experience

With the Windows 8 Consumer Preview version now out in the open, Microsoft's latest entry in its official Windows 8 blog site takes a step back from its usual format of explaining new features in its latest operating system. Today it has posted up interviews with two Windows 8 team members, Chris Edmonds and Mohammad Almalkawi, who have been on the team for about two and a half years each.

Edmonds was placed on the Windows Runtime Experience team where he worked on a number of projects such as registering Metro apps with WinRT along with helping to implement the application model for Metro apps. When asked what a normal day working on the Windows 8 team was like, Edmonds replied:

Normal day? One of the things that I really like about working in Windows is that there is rarely a normal day. Depending on the period of the product cycle, I may spend my day writing specifications, writing code, hashing out ideas with people on my team, fixing bugs, or one of many other activities. Even though the activities are varied, my day almost always involves problem solving in some form. Whether it is figuring out the cause of a crash or helping to design features, I get to work with smart people to solve interesting problems each day.

Almalkawi is a software design engineer on the Windows 8 team and helped to develop application extensions along with being the lead in development of the namespace enumeration API. When asked what the biggest surprise he had encountered since working on the Windows 8 team, he said:

The thing that surprised me the most at Microsoft is that you get thrown at real-world problems and you will be given the opportunity to own critical pieces from the very beginning. You learn on the job as opposed to training, which is also available if you need it.

With the Windows 8 Consumer Preview now available to the public, Almalkawi says he is now working to improve the performance of the OS. He states:

We built things from the start to be high performance, so now we are fine-tuning that performance, given the tons of code that has been written to the infrastructure.

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Here what I think of Windows 8 to it going be a mistake it going be Windows Millennium Edition (ME) and Windows Vista disaster all over ocen agine what are you thinking Microsoft are nuts, I for do not care for the unified experience between phone, tablet on a desktop.
I do not like Mail or Video or Music do not like the fact that it messing with 2nd harddrive which in turn cause chkdsk to be set off when booting back in to Windows 7.

For years so many people have been complaining that Microsoft need to move with the times and have a radical facelift, and now that its hereeveryone seems to believe that it should just go back to what it was. If you look at the future tech stuff coming out of Microsoft they obviously believe there's going to me a massive change in the way we interact with computers in the next few years, and they're probably right - computers are moving more into the background and are embracing the "casual audience" in much the same way the Wii did.
Windows 8 is an important step in that direction, but it's very obviously a transitionary step with the aim to start phasing out the traditional desktop completely.
I'm sure Microsoft is listening to all the feedback, especially after the perceived disaster of Vista (certainly in PR terms it was) - it is going to need to make certain actions more visible and help people get used to new ways of doing things, but it shouldn't just listen to the naysayers and traditionalists - if they did that we'd have never moved away from the command line interface.

I could go on for hours about the broader implications of Windows 8 and technology in general and how it is a mistake but here is my prediction.

Wow this new metro interface and going back and forth between the desktop and metro is soo jarring. Microsoft fix it!

>We listened to our customers, They don't like the jarring nature of the dual UI. So we have solved the problem in our next version of windows!

Result: No more traditional desktop.

If you would like to hear are more detailed and explanation or my prediction find #nttalk on AlphaChat IRC network.. or find me on the internet...

I think Windows 8 is a mistake Microsoft has to make. I understand they want a unified experience between phone, tablet and desktop, but at what cost? The average user will absolutely hate having to relearn everything and power users will hate what they've lost. Alienating your user base to try and bolster your tablet market could backfire, so it's bold for them to take that risk.

That said, I highly doubt I'll be upgrading. It's kinda sad because I've been doing it with every release since 3.11.

The average user won't have to relearn anything as they barely know how to use the OS they already have. They never venture into the "all programs" section of the start menu, let alone into parts like "accessories".
They couldn't care less if there's a desktop or not as long as ie10, their email, some games and word are on the home screen they will enjoy the experience more as Metro is (aguably) more pleasing to the eye.

ambiance said,
I think Windows 8 is a mistake Microsoft has to make. I understand they want a unified experience between phone, tablet and desktop, but at what cost? The average user will absolutely hate having to relearn everything and power users will hate what they've lost. Alienating your user base to try and bolster your tablet market could backfire, so it's bold for them to take that risk.

That said, I highly doubt I'll be upgrading. It's kinda sad because I've been doing it with every release since 3.11.

Ok I can see how it might be a little bit of an issue for the average user to get used to the new start screen and the buttons that are hidden off screen but what exactly have power users lost??? If you're gonna say a start button then there's no point replying coz you can still click in the bottom left or use the windows key to get the start screen up... which is just a bigger start menu. Power users will know this so I don't see what you're getting at

I want to see the moment when I finally have windows 8 with a very nice start orb and the metro part disabled:

-How do you remove that? OMG you're so fast using the mouse...
-Why do you remove that, are you nerd?

Arceles said,
I want to see the moment when I finally have windows 8 with a very nice start orb and the metro part disabled:

-How do you remove that? OMG you're so fast using the mouse...
-Why do you remove that, are you nerd?

what?

Arceles said,
I want to see the moment when I finally have windows 8 with a very nice start orb and the metro part disabled:

-How do you remove that? OMG you're so fast using the mouse...
-Why do you remove that, are you nerd?

You already have Windows with the very nice Start Orb - it's called Windows 7

And as for the 2nd part, you're a paragraph short of making sense.

Arceles said,
I want to see the moment when I finally have windows 8 with a very nice start orb and the metro part disabled:

-How do you remove that? OMG you're so fast using the mouse...
-Why do you remove that, are you nerd?

The moment you do that, your back to Windows 7 with the addition of ribbon in explorer.
This is the part that I don't get if people are going to spend the $100 or so on Windows 8 only to remake it into Windows 7 why not to just save the money and hold on to Windows 7?

I'm usually excited when it comes to new Windows versions but Windows 8 is a huge mistake. Dumbing down an already dumb audience is Apple's job. It seems that Ubuntu is slowly following suit. I feel old for thinking like this but computers will one day look like an iPhone running on the cloud with no customization options unless you want to pay for every little feature. Companies get it and people are beginning to pay blindly. While piracy will be thwarted when everything runs on the cloud, so does our definition of a pc. Yes, there will always be those computers that run older versions of Windows or Unix/Linux but most developers will be sold to the idea of the cloud.

schizo_ said,
I'm usually excited when it comes to new Windows versions but Windows 8 is a huge mistake. Dumbing down an already dumb audience is Apple's job. It seems that Ubuntu is slowly following suit. I feel old for thinking like this but computers will one day look like an iPhone running on the cloud with no customization options unless you want to pay for every little feature. Companies get it and people are beginning to pay blindly. While piracy will be thwarted when everything runs on the cloud, so does our definition of a pc. Yes, there will always be those computers that run older versions of Windows or Unix/Linux but most developers will be sold to the idea of the cloud.

Have they dumbed down the desktop portion of windows 8 in any way? No. All they've done is add a tablet/mobile device interface that runs alongside the original one. That's not dumbing down anything.

This hysteria about the start screen and metro is all for nothing.

Hardcore Til I Die said,
This hysteria about the start screen and metro is all for nothing.

...and no different from the hysteria over any UI change. Sucks to be MS - it's either "meh, it's just the same" or "GEEZUS HOW DARE THEY CHANGE >>>MY<<< UI"

dangel said,

...and no different from the hysteria over any UI change. Sucks to be MS - it's either "meh, it's just the same" or "GEEZUS HOW DARE THEY CHANGE >>>MY<<< UI"

Lol, reminds me of the fuss whenever Facebook makes a change - cue lots of angry "It was fine the way it was before" with most users totally forgetting that they'd complained previously and had just got used to it in the meantime!