Windows 8 to run Android apps via BlueStacks

Windows 8 already has plans to offer a way to directly purchase and download new programs via the Windows Store when it launches (hopefully) later this year. Now BlueStacks plans to offer up an app player that will allow Windows 8 to run all of the hundreds of thousands of apps on Google's Android Marketplace.

BlueStacks has already offered up its Android app player for Windows 7 and Vista back in October 2011. The upcoming Windows 8 version will take advantage of the operating system's Metro interface. As you can see in the above video, Android apps will have their own icons that will blend seamlessly into Windows 8's new touch screen user interface.

Venture Beat reports via CES 2012 that BlueStacks is hoping to making deals with makers of Windows 8-based notebooks and ultrabooks to pre-load its Android app player into their PCs. In fact it claims to have already signed an agreement with one of the, the Taiwan-based notebook maker InHon.

All in all it sounds like Windows 8 users won't lack for apps to play when the OS is finally released.

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I dont get it i was banns for posting cuz some comment i make about Microsoft but i see this guy (Dot Matrix) making bad comment about Android and he get free pass .

Gaara sama said,
I dont get it i was banns for posting cuz some comment i make about Microsoft but i see this guy (Dot Matrix) making bad comment about Android and he get free pass .

It's no secret many Android apps are.... lacking in quality.

Gaara sama said,
I dont get it i was banns for posting cuz some comment i make about Microsoft but i see this guy (Dot Matrix) making bad comment about Android and he get free pass .

I've seen much more critical comments posted (Against Microsoft and others), so whatever you said to get you banned, must have been one whopper of a comment... lol

M_Lyons10 said,

I've seen much more critical comments posted (Against Microsoft and others), so whatever you said to get you banned, must have been one whopper of a comment... lol

lol just don't mess around in the Mac forums. They come down on you quick.

PsYcHoKiLLa said,
Tried the BlueStacks App, at the moment it doesn't seem to run much of anything

Beats me why you just got assaulted for your comment. But you're right in that BlueStacks has a lot of limitations, and it's a result of several factors I've noticed through tinkering.

It's an out of date Android run-time, for starters. If you'd like, you can play with the trial version of YouWave, which claims to be Gingerbread compatible.

It doesn't offer any of the connectivity stuff many apps rely on. If you have a paid app that checks a license against a server, it'll probably fail to run. Anything that wants to talk to the Market, etc, will probably fail. Anything that wants to talk to particular hardware will probably fail.

Its model of syncing apps directly from your phone through the cloud is clever and a direction worth pursuing, but without something in place to handle the variety of calls apps make, it's not going to gain much traction.

That's not to say they won't figure something out!

PsYcHoKiLLa said,
Tried the BlueStacks App, at the moment it doesn't seem to run much of anything

Well, there's its own App Store, (which, you're right, doesn't have much,) there's the Cloud Connect App for transferring apps from you're phone, or you could hack the Android Market on it. BTW, the Win 8 one will use the Android Market...


It won't be of much use. The major Android apps that people would use this program for will be ported to Windows 8 by launch or soon thereafter. The very few others that are "Android Only" will be on such a small scale, they might find a suitable replacement for Windows.

PC509 said,

It won't be of much use. The major Android apps that people would use this program for will be ported to Windows 8 by launch or soon thereafter. The very few others that are "Android Only" will be on such a small scale, they might find a suitable replacement for Windows.

They won't be ported otherwise they would ALREADY be ported, that's just genius! <rolling eyes>. You missed the point, it's not that they need to port the apps, they can make the apps (as they ARE) to Windows without modification....

It's an app that ALLOWS droid apps to run... why do you people feel the need to make this so complicated?

PC509 said,

It won't be of much use. The major Android apps that people would use this program for will be ported to Windows 8 by launch or soon thereafter. The very few others that are "Android Only" will be on such a small scale, they might find a suitable replacement for Windows.

They won't be ported otherwise they would ALREADY be ported, that's just genius! <rolling eyes>. You missed the point, it's not that they need to port the apps, they can make the apps (as they ARE) to Windows without modification....

It's an app that ALLOWS droid apps to run... why do you people feel the need to make this so complicated?

Why, when they can run natively without emulation or requires a third party product to be installed?

rijp said,

They won't be ported otherwise they would ALREADY be ported, that's just genius! <rolling eyes>. You missed the point, it's not that they need to port the apps, they can make the apps (as they ARE) to Windows without modification....

It's an app that ALLOWS droid apps to run... why do you people feel the need to make this so complicated?

Windows 8 already has millions of "apps" they are called programs they've been around since windows 1...

but seriously though, this whole who has the most apps stuff is annoying especially when it comes to a desktop system which already has way more apps then anyone is going to count... oh wait no you dont consider it an app if it isn't downloaded through an app store? psh......

neufuse said,
Windows 8 already has millions of "apps" they are called programs they've been around since windows 1....

Except your x86 (8-bit, 16-bit) applications won't run on x86-64 bit. x86 binaries won't run on ARM. This is a bridge to get existing ARM apps runnin in Windows, while legacy Application (see not programs) developers, re-tool their apps to be cross platform in Metro fashion.

Full screen Metro apps designed for a tablet? That's what this is about. Yes, Windows 8 will have hundreds of thousands of programs available. Most of them will need to be adapted to use the MetroUI. I seriously doubt you could work with Excel in it's current form on a tablet (I don't know how that would adapt to a touchscreen, but we'll see).

neufuse said,
Windows 8 already has millions of "apps" they are called programs they've been around since windows 1...

but seriously though, this whole who has the most apps stuff is annoying especially when it comes to a desktop system which already has way more apps then anyone is going to count... oh wait no you dont consider it an app if it isn't downloaded through an app store? psh......

PC509 said,
Full screen Metro apps designed for a tablet? That's what this is about. Yes, Windows 8 will have hundreds of thousands of programs available. Most of them will need to be adapted to use the MetroUI. I seriously doubt you could work with Excel in it's current form on a tablet (I don't know how that would adapt to a touchscreen, but we'll see).

Office since 2007 was designed for tablets, that was one of their big pushes with 2007 was it was tablet friendly

dotf said,

Except your x86 (8-bit, 16-bit) applications won't run on x86-64 bit. x86 binaries won't run on ARM. This is a bridge to get existing ARM apps runnin in Windows, while legacy Application (see not programs) developers, re-tool their apps to be cross platform in Metro fashion.

8 bit apps? seriously? Windows apps have been a minimum 16 bit since windows 2, and there are millions of 32 bit apps already, hundreds of thousands of .NET apps that can be cross compiled to any arch...

my point is this whole "we have more apps" thing is stupid because we are classifying apps as a small subset of everything that can run on the device...

dotf said,

Except your x86 (8-bit, 16-bit) applications won't run on x86-64 bit. x86 binaries won't run on ARM. This is a bridge to get existing ARM apps runnin in Windows, while legacy Application (see not programs) developers, re-tool their apps to be cross platform in Metro fashion.

x86(8bit Assuming DOS stuff, right?, and 16bit) run just fine on x64. There is a feature called Virtual PC, and if you have the Professional or Ultimate edition, it is seamlessly integrated, just install the image for XP or even Win 3.1 if you want.

They run fine in the VM, and with the seamless integration, you don't even notice it is old crap software running except the UI border is different.

As for ARM, um... Not so fast. True x86 binaries won't run, but that doesn't mean .NET/Silverlight/etc won't run even if they have to have a realtime translation.

As for x86 binaries, because of how Windows NT works through a universal HAL, there is no reason that most developers can't simply recompile for ARM rather easily, unless they have used direct assembly in the application. And even then, adjust the assembly, and recompile.

Think back to last year, Microsoft was using an ARM tablet, and had Word, Excel, and even a build of Mozilla running on it. If the 'recompile' process was much work, do you think they would have had these running so quickly and easily? You realize that next to Windows itself, Word and Excel are the most complex pieces of software ever written? And if they can recompile them for ARM for a quick demonstration in a few days, I don't see the ARM issue being a problem.

This whole story makes me snicker considering a week or two ago I was obsessed with the idea of integrating an Android run-time into Windows 8.

I'm not too worried about the quality of the apps, since many games and apps scale in resolution surprisingly well, and nothing would ever need more than 2x zoom thanks to handset resolution getting higher and higher.

At any rate, I think it's silly to get angry about anything related to this story. So what if a company is pursuing this? Windows is an open platform. People can write whatever software they like.

Joshie said,
This whole story makes me snicker considering a week or two ago I was obsessed with the idea of integrating an Android run-time into Windows 8.

I'm not too worried about the quality of the apps, since many games and apps scale in resolution surprisingly well, and nothing would ever need more than 2x zoom thanks to handset resolution getting higher and higher.

At any rate, I think it's silly to get angry about anything related to this story. So what if a company is pursuing this? Windows is an open platform. People can write whatever software they like.


Precisely!

Two things I think this should have:

- ability to "pin" an Android app to the Start screen, for easier access (this is similar to pinning webpages to the Start screen with IE)
- a version for ARM Windows 8 that eliminates the overhead of processor emulation

Wouldn't it be the same as just turning off your firewall, delete your antivirus programs, open your WiFi to "all" and turning off your "junk" email filter. And then engage in the appropriate behavior like clicking on every link in every "junk" email. Load thumbdrives found in public. Of course if the droidie apps crash your Windows it will of course be 'Softie's fault. Why not just keep them on Google's sandbox (kitty liter).

starch said,
Wouldn't it be the same as just turning off your firewall, delete your antivirus programs, open your WiFi to "all" and turning off your "junk" email filter. And then engage in the appropriate behavior like clicking on every link in every "junk" email. Load thumbdrives found in public. Of course if the droidie apps crash your Windows it will of course be 'Softie's fault. Why not just keep them on Google's sandbox (kitty liter).

Um they will be sandboxed... WinRT various technologies are also sandboxed, and IE that can run inside Metro is also sandboxed.

Android is a security concern, but it should only hurt other Android Apps.

xpclient said,
So anyone tried this on Windows 7 and does the alpha version expire and how stable is it?

The current alpha doesn't expire, and runs on Windows 7 (even x64) just fine - provided you have at least a quad-core CPU; however, the same is true of most desktop-virtualization software - even VirtualBox or VMware.

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