Windows Azure gets hit with extended down time

Microsoft got a rude awakening on Tuesday thanks to a global shut down of its popular Windows Azure cloud-based service. Azure was shut down for nearly 10 hours starting on Tuesday, leaving a lot of enterprise customers in the dark.

As it turned out, the issue that caused Windows Azure to shut down was due to, of all things, a simple software bug. In a post on the Windows Azure blog site, Microsoft's Bill Laing stated:

While final root cause analysis is in progress, this issue appears to be due to a time calculation that was incorrect for the leap year.   Once we discovered the issue we immediately took steps to protect customer services that were already up and running, and began creating a fix for the issue.

Yes, that means Microsoft's programmers could not figure out how to tell Azure that Wednesday was in fact Leap Day.

In another blog post written today, Laing said that all of the systems were now up and running. He added:

The teams are already hard at work on the root cause analysis and I will share those details on this blog in the next 10 days. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this has caused.

There's no word yet if Microsoft plans to offer Windows Azure customers any compensation for the downtime this week.

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Our production servers in North US did not get effected at all but because the management portal and the back end deployment services were down, we couldn't make new test deployments, which was a real pain as we had a product release and sign off.

Microsoft got a rude awakening on Tuesday thanks to a global shut down of its popular Windows Azure cloud-based service

I'm not sure how 3.8% of services being affected constitutes a "global shutdown," but if you say so...

They usually refund like 50% of the cost for the month for a downtime like this. At least thats what they do with Office 365.

Enron said,
They usually refund like 50% of the cost for the month for a downtime like this. At least thats what they do with Office 365.

I think for downtime like this Office 365 users shouldn't need a refund as they are still getting 365 days a year of uptime!

Fred 69 said,

I think for downtime like this Office 365 users shouldn't need a refund as they are still getting 365 days a year of uptime!

I didn't really need a refund either, but it's part of their service level agreement. They guarantee 99.9% uptime.

TCLN Ryster said,
Oh dear. 2012 and MS programmers just "forgot" about leap years?

I actually heard that Microsoft Servers use the mayan calendar for time management.. They are trying to correct the problem before the calendar ends! /s

Lachlan said,

I actually heard that Microsoft Servers use the mayan calendar for time management.. They are trying to correct the problem before the calendar ends! /s


Lol, I still joke with everyone at work that there's no need to buy Christmas presents this year, or at least give them before December 21st :-P