Windows Azure now used by over 50 percent of Fortune 500 companies

Microsoft continues to promote how much growth it has seen in its Windows Azure business. In April, the company announced that the division has now generated over $1 billion in annual revenue for the first time.

In a new blog post, Microsoft offers up some more statistics on the Windows Azure division, including word that over 50 percent of the world's Fortune 500 companies are now using the cloud services. Steven Martin, the general manager of Windows Azure, states, "In just a year, we have grown to over 200 services for our platform, more than doubled our customer base (now at 250,000) and are seeing an average of 1,000 new customers per day."

Martin writes that Microsoft manages to double the amount of Windows Azure's compute power, along with doubling the amount of storage it can handle, every six to nine months. He adds:

With over four trillion objects in Windows Azure and an average of 270,000 requests per second, customer requirements grow and are met daily. In peak periods, demand can grow to a staggering 880,000 requests per second.

Microsoft recently announced some changes to the pricing model for Windows Azure customers, including a reduction of the free trial from three months to just one month, but also offering $200 in free credits.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Xbox 360 sales still strong with 114,000 units sold in May 2013

Next Story

Microsoft shows off new concepts for Windows 8 in-app ads

11 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

"X is used by over xxx percent of Fortune 500 companies" this means noting. Big companies uses a lot of technologies. For example, it is not rare to find that a single company uses ASP.NET, J2EE and PHP and the same time. The important is when a company uses x technology or service as the core of the business.

A server farm technology being used by the fortune 50 is a massive deal, its a lot different than using different languages.

It's MS's new billion dollar business and it's only going to keep growing as they add more ability to it and tweak the pricing more.

duddit2 said,
And this is the backbone of the xbox ones cloud system, win

That's not really a distinction though. Yes, MS has made an Azure based system in the xbox live walled garden for xbox one devs to use. However the azure implementation this article is about is on the public internet, that's how the fortune 500 companies use it, and nothing is stopping PS4 developers from making games that use the public azure cloud. MS had to make a separate azure cloud for xbox one devs because of the limited access to the public internet by the xbox one, i.e. the Xbox live "walled garden". The PS3/PS4 has no such limitation (even now PS3 devs can set up their own locally hosted servers on the public internet for their games) with PSN acting more like steam running on the public internet instead of in place of it. So again this means PS4 games can access azure (or amazons cloud services or anyone elses for that matter) just fine. The big difference between the PS3 and the PS4 is that, to continue the steam analogy, Sony is requiring all PS4 devs to use the PSN equivalent of Steamworks so there is only one achievement list, friends list, voice support, etc. instead of each dev being able to roll their own like on the PS3 which caused huge fragmentation. This doesn't prevent PS4 devs from accessing cloud services though.

Asmodai said,

That's not really a distinction though. Yes, MS has made an Azure based system in the xbox live walled garden for xbox one devs to use. However the azure implementation this article is about is on the public internet, that's how the fortune 500 companies use it, and nothing is stopping PS4 developers from making games that use the public azure cloud...

Somewhat true, but the difference is in the SDK. The cloudcompute services of the Xbox One are integrated in development, and unified for all games. Developers can offload workloads to the cloud without having to "set up their own back end" as is the case otherwise.

Like having Kinect for all systems, the certainty of this infrastructure will certainly mean that more games use it -- particularly as the console ages and developers start looking for ways to squeeze out more performance.

-Forjo

Forjo said,

Somewhat true, but the difference is in the SDK. The cloudcompute services of the Xbox One are integrated in development, and unified for all games. Developers can offload workloads to the cloud without having to "set up their own back end" as is the case otherwise.

Well that's a trade off then isn't it. If they don't have to set up their own cloud back end then that means they are limited to whatever MS provides for them. If they set up their own back end on Microsoft's public Azure cloud they have no such constraints. Furthermore they aren't limited to just Microsoft's cloud implementation, they could use Amazon's cloud services or any other cloud service provider while the Xbox One developers on have MS as an option.. Heck if they really wanted to they could set up their own cloud for their PS3/4 and PC games (for example EA could make their own cloud that all their games share).
Forjo said,

Like having Kinect for all systems, the certainty of this infrastructure will certainly mean that more games use it -- particularly as the console ages and developers start looking for ways to squeeze out more performance.

Personally I think the main use for this on the Xbox One is to act as dedicated servers for multiplayer games since dedicated servers on Xbox Live aren't really a viable option. Since you CAN have dedicated servers with PSN (again, it's just running on top of the public internet so games can access servers that developers set up and put on the internet) it's largely irrelevant to Playstation devs. I seriously doubt it will be used in single player games since it requires a constant internet connection (not a big deal for multiplayer where you need a connection anyway but this goes well beyond once every 24hours if it's running calculations for a single player game the whole time during gameplay). Also the vast majority for 3rd party games are likely to be cross platform so just because all Xbox One games have access to it the fact the the PS4 and PC don't means I doubt developers with bother putting any important dependence on the cloud since it won't be there for two of the three platforms they are targeting. Again it's main use on Xbox One will be to fill in for dedicated servers which Xbox Live doesn't generally allow but PC and PSN do.

Asmodai said,

Well that's a trade off then isn't it. If they don't have to set up their own cloud back end then that means they are limited to whatever MS provides for them. If they set up their own back end on Microsoft's public Azure cloud they have no such constraints. Furthermore they aren't limited to just Microsoft's cloud implementation, they could use Amazon's cloud services or any other cloud service provider while the Xbox One developers on have MS as an option.. Heck if they really wanted to they could set up their own cloud for their PS3/4 and PC games (for example EA could make their own cloud that all their games share).

Yes, they can. But guess what? It's not free to connect your PS4 game to Azure or Amazon, so it probably won't be done. It's free for them to use the Xbox cloud.