Windows Phone 8 smartphone Huawei W1 to be sold in the U.S.

Way back in June 2012, Microsoft announced that Chinese-based Huawei would be among its four hardware partners for Windows Phone 8. However, Huawei's smartphone, the Ascend W1, was released first in other parts of the world outside the U.S.. Today, the company announced that will change later this month with a launch of that smartphone here in this country.

Huawei's press release states that the smartphone, with a slight name change to the Huawei W1 (dropping the Ascend title) will go on sale later this month at Walmart's online store and in some of its retail store locations in the U.S. The smartphone has a 1.2 Ghz dual core processor, a four inch IPS screen with Gorilla Glass, 512MB of memory, 4 GB of on board storage, a microSD slot for adding more storage and a five megapixel rear camera.

Pricing and an exact release date for the Huawei W1's U.S. launch has yet to be revealed but it is supposed to be "competitively priced" with an unlimited 30 day no-contract plan. However, the company will begin a contest on May 15th that will let some people win the smartphone, along with tickets to the Jonas Brothers music tour, which is being sponsored this year by Huawei.

Source: Huawei | Image via Huawei

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16 Comments

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Advantages over the 520/620: Gorilla glass screen, 1.9A battery (vs 1.47), NFC, faster CPU, front camera (520-only), LED flash (620-only but the 520/620 sensor is still noticeably better)
Disadvantages: 4gb of internal memory with only 2gb available (apps can only stay in the phone memory so forget installing large maps/games and WP8 will still eat part of those 2gb for temporary files so the actual space will be noticeably smaller), no Nokia apps except for maps, the most plasticky back cover that ever existed.

I've heard good things about these phones - vanilla installation of Windows Phone 8, minimal customisation and very fast/reliable. Although it is priced as a middle of the road phone I would argue that such a classification really under sells itself given how great it is.

Mr Nom Nom's said,
I've heard good things about these phones - vanilla installation of Windows Phone 8, minimal customisation and very fast/reliable. Although it is priced as a middle of the road phone I would argue that such a classification really under sells itself given how great it is.

You can uninstall any Nokia app included on the Lumia so it doesn't matter which brand you buy you can bring it to a vanilla install except for a couple of customized settings, you lose all the Nokia apps if you buy the W1 or 8S though (not the maps/navigation though, the Nokia-Microsoft deal made the maps available to every manufacturer).

It's good that Microsoft is getting more OEMs invovled in the WP ecosystem. The more options there are for consumers, the better. Now, they just need to get the phones into the wild and garner market share. When the people come, so do the developers.

because you know, the USA really wants a device that is made by a company that the USA Government refuses to purchase products from because they have found network bugging firmware on them.

No they haven't. they even had inspections on the hard and software background. US just want to prevent buying from non us companies. They don't care that half the electronics is made in china anyways -

littleneutrino said,
because you know, the USA really wants a device that is made by a company that the USA Government refuses to purchase products from because they have found network bugging firmware on them.
There was no evidence or proof of this occurring. It was only a concern.

They didn't want to allow a company that is essentially owned by the Chinese government to install telecommunications infrastructure within the domestic United States. They have this right, and it was a good decision since the company providing equipment would need to know details and have access to said infrastructure. It wasn't about where the products were made. They're virtually all made in China anyway. It was about the information that would be available to the company (aka the Chinese government).

littleneutrino said,
because you know, the USA really wants a device that is made by a company that the USA Government refuses to purchase products from because they have found network bugging firmware on them.

No evidence like others said. The CEO/owner of the company also recently broke media silence (after 25yrs of being silent) to comment on this. And the issue is that the US Gov things Huawei has ties with the Chinese Gov.

littleneutrino said,
.....USA....

Yet, the majority of Cell tower equipment for 4G/LTE towers are Huawei.....
The handset is the least of your worries.

Awesome news... Hopefully Sprint will at least *consider* picking this up? (hey, we can dream, right?)