Windows Phone: Only one major update a year

Microsoft has revealed in a rather discreet way that the scheduling of releases for the Windows Phone platform will consist of around only one major update annually. In a job advertisement, the company essentially stated that while updates will come as and when they are needed throughout the year, a game-changing release will only come every 12 months.

The major update for 2011, it would appear then, is the Mango 7.5 release which is expected sometime in September this year. Over 500 new features are expected to be coming to the platform in the update, with examples being Internet Explorer 9 and multi-tasking. While this is a monumental update for the platform, of which can be compared with others such as Apple's iOS and Google's Android, some are feeling hard done by as the updates between these annual releases are at the moment, few and far between.

In the job posting, the position that Microsoft is advertising, states that the successful candidate will "[drive] all development work on the Application Platform for update releases between major yearly releases." This may be a plan by the company to step up it's releasing cycle given that it previously stated that updates to its phones would come on a regular basis.

There was trouble earlier in the year when the NoDo update, which many anticipated due to its new copy and paste functionality, had trouble getting to consumers due to issues with the phone manufacturers. The delays that followed disappointed fans and analysts, which may explain why Microsoft has since been cautious with delivering small scale updates to users.

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Quote:
This Senior Program Manager position will be the CXE Feature PM that drives all development work on the Application Platform for update releases between major yearly releases. You will work closely with the Application Platform team who is working on major yearly releases and with the best technologies/teams across the company (e.g. Silverlight, XNA, .NET Compact Framework)


From my reading, the Application Platform people are the ones who release changes every year, which makes sense: it takes about that much time to not only get new APIs ready for developers but to educate them fully on it. The app platform is more foundational, and also tied closely to released hardware capability. Meanwhile, the posting also says "update releases between major yearly releases" so that's when they'll add features (like copy-paste)

burnblue said,
Quote:
This Senior Program Manager position will be the CXE Feature PM that drives all development work on the Application Platform for update releases between major yearly releases. You will work closely with the Application Platform team who is working on major yearly releases and with the best technologies/teams across the company (e.g. Silverlight, XNA, .NET Compact Framework)


From my reading, the Application Platform people are the ones who release changes every year, which makes sense: it takes about that much time to not only get new APIs ready for developers but to educate them fully on it. The app platform is more foundational, and also tied closely to released hardware capability. Meanwhile, the posting also says "update releases between major yearly releases" so that's when they'll add features (like copy-paste)

Ya, I expect 2-3 smaller updates between the big ones tbh.

Flawed said,
I'm curious where are the Windows Phone 1-6 series? Did I miss those releases?

That "joke" got old 7 months ago.

Flawed said,
I'm curious where are the Windows Phone 1-6 series? Did I miss those releases?

WM 6.5.3 is the best mobile OS Microsoft has released, at least so far. I bought back a HD2 and put the HD7 in the drawer; what a relief: all calendar entries, tasks, categories, desktop syncing... all the expected functionalities of a 2011 mobile OS are here.

Gaara sama said,
Windows Phone 7 need to be more simple not complicated

You seem to be doing well in that area.

Gaara sama said,
Windows Phone 7 need to be more simple not complicated

I can tell you havent used one. How could it be simpler? Everyone I hand it too has it figured out in a few minutes unlike handing someone an android phone.

BrewNinja said,
I can tell you havent used one. How could it be simpler? Everyone I hand it too has it figured out in a few minutes unlike handing someone an android phone.
Exactly. The entire basis of the OS is simplicity rather than pretty, yet useless complexity.

I find that almost every Windows Phone hater has never actually used the phone. They judge the book by its cover and immediately discard everything about it.

pickypg said,
Exactly. The entire basis of the OS is simplicity rather than pretty, yet useless complexity.

I find that almost every Windows Phone hater has never actually used the phone. They judge the book by its cover and immediately discard everything about it.

Sure... (Sarcasm) MS simplicity paradigm: lack of options. Very good indeed.

Just as example: there is no way for the phone calendar to keep entries older than two weeks even when you sync with Exchange; the only way to have older entries kept is to enter on the phone and not on your desktop/laptop. Smart, very smart indeed....

Fritzly said,

Sure... (Sarcasm) MS simplicity paradigm: lack of options. Very good indeed.

Just as example: there is no way for the phone calendar to keep entries older than two weeks even when you sync with Exchange; the only way to have older entries kept is to enter on the phone and not on your desktop/laptop. Smart, very smart indeed....

Small quirks are just that: quirks. There is nothing different from that than arbitrary limits on downloading email history in other OSes.

Besides, that is the simple option. They chose to implement a simple, default option rather than complicate the process by adding configuration to it. Obviously some people prefer the configurability, but most people probably don't need it. Ergo, it did not make the first release (or mid-cycle patch). I actually agree that it's a useful feature (e.g., "When did I go to the eye doctor last year; I remember it was June?"), but I am not going to fault them for missing that feature on a first release. And since I don't personally need it, I probably won't even fault them in the next release.

My point is that you will always be able to find something nitpicky in any of the OSes. This is no different than complaining about an arbitrary limit on email history downloading (e.g., my iPhone 4 limits me to showing 200 recent email messages, but iOS 5 apparently bumps it up to 1,000). Some people want it to be dynamic. Heck, some people even need it to be. But the vast majority do not. Hence, they focus on the everything else.

And what's with the graphic "Windows Phone 7 Series" - the "Series" was dropped AGES ago before it was even released. Can we get someone at Neowin that actually knows something about Windows Phone to do the actual Windows Phone posts?

Northgrove said,
Why the "only"?

Possibly because other companies offer "game-changing" updates more often than once a year. Then again, I guess it would depend on what you consider to be "game-changing."

Intrinsica said,

Possibly because other companies offer "game-changing" updates more often than once a year. Then again, I guess it would depend on what you consider to be "game-changing."

They said "major update." That's a pre-dot update, not a post-dot, e.g., 4.x to 5.x rather than x.1 to x.2. Apple offers one new "major update" each year. iOS 1 in 2007, iOS 2 in 2008, iOS 3 in 2009, iOS 4 in 2010, and iOS 5 in 2011. How is that different than MS's strategy?

JJMustang said,

Apple offers one new "major update" each year. iOS 1 in 2007, iOS 2 in 2008, iOS 3 in 2009, iOS 4 in 2010, and iOS 5 in 2011. How is that different than MS's strategy?

Exactly.

Seems that all the major players are taking this approach. iOS has always been 1 major update a year, Android has recently changed to a yearly major update and now WP.

Not sure if that's realistic to expect. Apple is already on the high side compared to many other manufacturers. HTC dropped updates for my HTC Legend only 6 months after its release. Never buying from that company again.

zikalify said,
So long as the life of a device is more than iPhones (2-3 yrs) im fine with it.

Well, I am not an Apple fanboy, but I do see that Apple does provides a very long support for the iPhone. I thought that iOS 5 would dump the 3GS by now.

zikalify said,
So long as the life of a device is more than iPhones (2-3 yrs) im fine with it.

And not to mention Apple will be supporting iOS 5 on the iPhone 3GS which is what? Almost 3 years old?

.Neo said,
Not sure if that's realistic to expect. Apple is already on the high side compared to many other manufacturers. HTC dropped updates for my HTC Legend only 6 months after its release. Never buying from that company again.
It's not just HTC, blame your carrier...Actually, here in the US, they're much better than other manufacturers like Samsung or LG or Moto, etc. Plus, there's always XDA-dev, and HTC devices on there are among the most popular.

.Neo said,
Not sure if that's realistic to expect. Apple is already on the high side compared to many other manufacturers. HTC dropped updates for my HTC Legend only 6 months after its release. Never buying from that company again.
Not sure why its not realistic? Its 1ghz processor and therefore phone is very capable, what new ground breaking feature will need dual core processors anyway?

Lucas said,

And not to mention Apple will be supporting iOS 5 on the iPhone 3GS which is what? Almost 3 years old?

No. The 3GS came out two years ago. One year before the iPhone 4, which is now one year old. Not to mention, like the 3G before it, Apple and AT&T are still selling new iPhone 3GS'.

It is absolute bull that iOS 4 killed support mid-cycle (some time in February, I believe with 4.2.1 or 4.3) for the iPhone 3G because regardless of its original release date (Summer 2008), they were selling it up until the day before the iPhone 4 was released. I fully expect them to kill support for the iPhone 3GS mid-cycle as well, completely hanging out to dry everyone that is buying one now, as they hang out with a 2 year contract.

If they were upfront about it, then that would be one thing, but as it is, they are just underhanded.

Einlander said,
Step one: Release the update.

They already did that step, my phones had 3 updates to date. Sure they're not "major" but hey, you just said "update" not "major update".

GP007 said,

They already did that step, my phones had 3 updates to date. Sure they're not "major" but hey, you just said "update" not "major update".


I said THE not A.

Owner of a nodo hd7 on tmobile us