Windows Phone usage remains flat in the US for Q2

Microsoft has been pushing out new Windows Phone updates at a constant rate and is going all-in with Cortana but in the US market, that has resulted in little gain in market share. The latest numbers from comScore have been released and Microsoft's mobile OS has remained nearly flat.

When comparing the three month average ending in March to the three month average ending in June, Microsoft took an additional .01% of the market, or 3.4% in total, up from 3.3%. Meanwhile, Android dropped by .3%, Apple jumped by .7% with Blackberry and others dropped as well.

The US market is critical for Microsoft as most of the smartphones sold in that country are of the mid-range to premium style handsets that have the largest margin. Currently, Microsoft sells most of its Lumia handsets in the entry level category with the Lumia 5XX and 6XX series devices which have a small margin.

Other stats show that Apple is the largest shareholder of smartphones in the use with 42.1% of the market with Samsung in second at 28.6% and LG pulling up third place at 28.6%.

With Microsoft's new rapid release cadence, we will be curious to see if the additional exposure created by releasing updates so often is able to boost consumer awareness and adoption of the platform.

Source: comScore

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I like how the chart essentially shows that overall the US smartphone market stayed pretty much flat for most manufacturers, but Brad decides to only single out WP.

The smartphone market has pretty much stagnated at this point. There hasn't been anything revolutionary in a long time now and all the new phones are just spec bumps. Since things haven't changed much, people are locked into contracts and into various ecosystems it's not really a surprise that the entire market is pretty much flat. At the end of the day, I wouldn't want to switch ecosystems because it would just be a giant hassle to get everything set up again and for what? The same ###### but a different look to the OS?

Hell I haven't found the need to update my lumia 900 which is over 2 years old now because it has all the apps I need and it works. Not going to spend couple of hundred dollars just for a faster processor. There needs to be something truly different but I haven't really seen that come out of Apple, Microsoft or Google in a long time.

The next IPHONE will have a quad display or something and it will be called SUPER DUPER RETINA and it will be ground breaking and innovation at it's best then you'll see it sell millions again. Other phone makers don't have a chance.

And people think that with the arrival of Tizen, it will signal the death of Android. If MS, a known popular and trusted company, cannot break big in to the market after several years, then others will have a harder problem.

And in other news, preliminary worldwide marketshare (the only marketshare that counts) is:


Motorola has surprised us with a stellar Q2 and shipped 8.6M smartphones. As Nokia was on the bubble at 10th before this, and now Motorola jumps back into the Top 10, that pushes Nokia out. You heard it here first Nokia/Microsoft falls out of the Top 10 first time in its history, the inventor of smartphones doesn't fit into 10 largest smartphone makers.

We have rare Samsung definite (and almost precise) numbers. nice. Two of the four analyst houses already gave their numbers and a couple of Chinese makers have given H1 numbers (six months) which allows us to do a good guesstimate of their Q2 numbers. So this is the rough ranking and market share of the Top 10:

1. Samsung at 74.1M units market share about 25%.
2. Apple at 35.2M units market share about 11%.
3. Huawei at 3 or 4, with 15.6M units and about 5%.
4. LG with 14.5M units and 5% market share.
5. Lenovo is almost definitely in the Top 5. Note, after the Motorola acquisition is completed, Lenovo leaps easily to number three.
6/7/8. We have a fight between three Chinese brands: Xiaomi, ZTE and Coolpad. Any one could be sixth, seventh or eighth.
8. Xiaomi we know is 11.7M units and about 4% market share.
9. Sony at 8.8M units and about 3% market share.
10. Motorola (Google) at 8.6 M units and about 3% market share. Note Moto is in the process of being acquired by Lenovo.
11. Microsoft-Nokia at 7.7M units and under 3% market share.

In the OS wars its 85% Android, 11% iPhone and who cares about the last 4%.


http://communities-dominate.bl...bers-as-we-get-data-in.html

So it's official folks, Microsoft-Nokia is no longer in the top 10 manufacturers of smartphones.

Probably the reason is "No New Phones" until the last couple of weeks. Hope it'll get better when they finally get around to bringing out some new high end models.

This is pretty much where Windows Phone will stay +/- a small percentage shift. Even after contracts are up, what significant features do their phones offer over the "big two"? Folks here will disagree with me but if Microsoft can't make a meaningful dent on their own home turf, adjustments need to be made. The market in the United States does matter!

Market in the US is difficult to crack because the true price of high end phones including all iPhones is hidden. MS is making good progress where people are aware of the real prices and hence iPhone(s) loses big time there. For example, Nokia Lumias are doing good in India because they are available in low-mid-high end whereas iPhones are a rare sight.
Then we also have lethargy of people - they continue buying the same phone (iPhone--->iPhone, Galaxy--->Galaxy etc.) because they either don't care or not aware.
Feature wise all 3 are at parity and WP doesn't need to offer anything special over the "big" two. e.g. your own post above where you didn't bother to try WP as a change for few years (for whatever reason).
It's people who need to be open to change.

I hate to be the one to say this and hence appear rude, etc, but continuing with the same ecosystem is not lethargy or lack of awareness and should not be regarded as such.
It's actually the sign of a content userbase who is happy with the specific ecosystem, has invested in it or most likely, a combination of the two.

I have been with Apple phones since 2008 and to me, WP offers no reason to move to it. That doesn't make me lethargic or unaware.

Packet1009 said,
I hate to be the one to say this and hence appear rude, etc, but continuing with the same ecosystem is not lethargy or lack of awareness and should not be regarded as such.
It's actually the sign of a content userbase who is happy with the specific ecosystem, has invested in it or most likely, a combination of the two.

I have been with Apple phones since 2008 and to me, WP offers no reason to move to it. That doesn't make me lethargic or unaware.

Exactly! Windows Phones does not have one feature that makes me say, "I've got to have that phone". If it did, I'd have no problem buying one.

Packet1009 said,
I hate to be the one to say this and hence appear rude, etc, but continuing with the same ecosystem is not lethargy or lack of awareness and should not be regarded as such.
It's actually the sign of a content userbase who is happy with the specific ecosystem, has invested in it or most likely, a combination of the two.

I have been with Apple phones since 2008 and to me, WP offers no reason to move to it. That doesn't make me lethargic or unaware.


I don't see why you are offended by the word lethargy but then you admit you have no desire to try out WP.
To use the tired car analogy - you keep on buying a Toyota because you have been happy with them and have no reason to go out and buy another brand (say a Honda) when you need to buy a new car.
This doesn't mean Honda is lacking - it just your choice and/or lack of will to try something new.
JHBrown said,
Exactly! Windows Phones does not have one feature that makes me say, "I've got to have that phone". If it did, I'd have no problem buying one.

Neither does iPhone or Android. I moved on from iPhone in 2010 (switched to WP and Android and eventually all WP) and iPhone doesn't offer any feature that makes me want to buy it.
If I buy WP again next time, it is my lethargic attitude not that iPhone has a problem.

BajiRav said,

I don't see why you are offended by the word lethargy but then you admit you have no desire to try out WP.
To use the tired car analogy - you keep on buying a Toyota because you have been happy with them and have no reason to go out and buy another brand (say a Honda) when you need to buy a new car.
This doesn't mean Honda is lacking - it just your choice and/or lack of will to try something new.

I suppose I should assume you're unaware of the negative connotations of your words.

I feel you're missing the central point here - so I'll try one more time and I'll make it more centric to your close to heart interest of WP:

- I am not admitting a lack of desire on my part as a personal failing (and woe betide the individual who should treat it as such)

- As one would reasonably assume, I am invested in one particular ecosystem - both in terms of money and functionality - uprooting both of which require incredibly compelling reasons.

WP does not provide said incredibly compelling reasons.

And yes, the car analogy, is, in this case, tired out.

I am glad you found your smartphone environment niche with WP after much self-admitted moving around and experimentation on your part.

And just as in your case as much as mine, choosing to continue with your now preferred smartphone ecosystem is not a failing on your part.

So now should one blame the other platforms that they have not made a compelling case for you to switch to them? Absolutely.

BajiRav said,

I don't see why you are offended by the word lethargy but then you admit you have no desire to try out WP.

This is a tech site and most of us are enthusiasts what makes you think that everyone here that uses Android or iOS hasn't tried WP and decided that its simply not for them? I bet you the majority of people who post here have at the very least tried WP at a retail location out of curiosity and said, "nah, not worth the switch"....while a good chunk of us have used WP extensively for development, debugging or even personal use and again came to the conclusion that it is not a platform worth switching to

Sonne said,

This is a tech site and most of us are enthusiasts what makes you think that everyone here that uses Android or iOS hasn't tried WP and decided that its simply not for them? I bet you the majority of people who post here have at the very least tried WP at a retail location out of curiosity and said, "nah, not worth the switch"....while a good chunk of us have used WP extensively for development, debugging or even personal use and again came to the conclusion that it is not a platform worth switching to


OP by his own admission not used or. Context is everything.

Sonne said,
This is a tech site and most of us are enthusiasts what makes you think that everyone here that uses Android or iOS hasn't tried WP and decided that its simply not for them? I bet you the majority of people who post here have at the very least tried WP at a retail location out of curiosity and said, "nah, not worth the switch"....while a good chunk of us have used WP extensively for development, debugging or even personal use and again came to the conclusion that it is not a platform worth switching to

I personally really like WP, but their own slow growth and lacking manufacturers for their devices is what really has me up in arms. I have a friend who's stayed with Microsoft since even before WP debuted, but seeing his own frustrating of WP catching up to Android and even iOS in some aspects is upsetting.

When it was fresh and new, I was cautious to jump aboard, and at this point, I'm kind of glad that I didn't, seeing where things stand 2 years later.

Hopefully Microsoft gets things going, but right now, I just don't see its worth. :/

Packet1009 said,

I suppose I should assume you're unaware of the negative connotations of your words.

I feel you're missing the central point here - so I'll try one more time and I'll make it more centric to your close to heart interest of WP:

- I am not admitting a lack of desire on my part as a personal failing (and woe betide the individual who should treat it as such)

- As one would reasonably assume, I am invested in one particular ecosystem - both in terms of money and functionality - uprooting both of which require incredibly compelling reasons.

WP does not provide said incredibly compelling reasons.

And yes, the car analogy, is, in this case, tired out.

I am glad you found your smartphone environment niche with WP after much self-admitted moving around and experimentation on your part.

And just as in your case as much as mine, choosing to continue with your now preferred smartphone ecosystem is not a failing on your part.

So now should one blame the other platforms that they have not made a compelling case for you to switch to them? Absolutely.


If you are that heavily invested in IOS or Android, nothing on WP will make you switch. It doesn't matter how compelling its features are. All smartphones are now almost same in terms of features and expecting any OS to innovate while ignoring its existing unique features (UI in WP's case) is simply backward thinking.

BajiRav said,

OP by his own admission not used or. Context is everything.
I came from a Windows Phone 7(Samsung Focus), tried a Nokia Lumia 920 for 12 days, returned it back to AT&T(threw it on the counter in the store) after not being satisfied. I live near the Microsoft Store in Los Angeles and spend a couple of hours in there every month playing with all of the gadgets. I gave it try bud!

Sir Topham Hatt said,
Maybe the rapid release of phones has helped the market pretty much stop...

Rapid release by others but MS/Nokia didn't put anything new on the market for Q2, the 630 and 930 will show up in Q3. Anyways, it's telling how, in the US, it's Apple and Samsung and then all the other OEMs are fighting for scraps.

Samsung starting to lose revenue, other manufacturers are starting to gain momentum.
LG and Motorola mainly.

HTC had good earnings on the M8, but they are starting to lose money again.

seta-san said,
can't expect that great of a change. many people are locked into two year contracts.

the contract is with the sim, not the phone. Theres nothing to stop someone selling their phone and buying a new one. Just put the same sim in the new phone.

You can even sell the original phone, use that money to pay off the contract and then take out a whole new contract (depending on how many months you have left, against how much you can sell your phone for).

This is actually what I have just done this last week.

Sold my phone for £250, paid off my existing contract which was £180, took out a new contract which gives £150 cashback. I've ended up with a better phone, cheaper payment a month, an extra 1gb data and money in the bank lol

Not an excuse though, that would only matter it all the contracts expired at the same date. As it is, there are constantly contracts expiring, moved or renewed.

seta-san said,
can't expect that great of a change. many people are locked into two year contracts.
The phone has been out for a few years now.

Can't say im that surprised

The mobile phone market has stagnated. Can't really think of anything ground breaking for a good few years. There's been the odd little nice addition, but at the end of the day, smartphones peaked around the iphone 4 and little has changed since.

Spec bumps, bigger screens, better cameras, faster graphics......it still performs the same function. If Microsoft wants to gain real ground, they have to do something nobody else has done before so the consumer thinks "wow, i must buy that"

Good analysis. Have to say that I agree. With that it all comes down to personal choice now. To me the most important aspect for me on a phone is the ecosystem. I am using a WP 8.1 for work and an Android for my personal use and the Android beats WP hands down.

And if somebody disagrees. Well good for them that they have the choice to choose any phone they like without a jack *** telling them what is right and what is wrong :)

pmdci said,
Good analysis. Have to say that I agree. With that it all comes down to personal choice now. To me the most important aspect for me on a phone is the ecosystem. I am using a WP 8.1 for work and an Android for my personal use and the Android beats WP hands down.

And if somebody disagrees. Well good for them that they have the choice to choose any phone they like without a jack *** telling them what is right and what is wrong :)

I have to say, my work phone is Windows, my personal one is Android and the wifes is an iphone. They are all good in their own right, for different reasons.

That's why if Microsoft really wants to start gaining ground they need to think of something new. Cortana isn't it.....it's just microsofts version of siri and google now. Now you might think cortana is way better, but it's still the same old idea, but improved upon. Please dream up something cool and great.....so I can buy it lol

While I agree with you on the whole, I think it's that stagnation in innovation that's giving other players a chance to steal market share from Apple. It's because of cheaper phones and an option of screen sizes that Android has been able to take so much market share from Apple. That's more visible outside of the States with many countries in Europe giving Android 70% of the market.

WP has been unable to gain traction partially because of the app issue, but also due to limited availability of devices. It's 95% Nokia and with exclusives, mediocre marketing it's no surprise market share hasn't changed much. I think now we've got 8.1 (.1) and soon HTC, Samsung and rumours of LG and many others coming out with strong WP devices there's a good chance that in a couple of quarters time WP will have made a good bit of growth. It'll be hard with the iPhone 6 coming out soon but even still I could see market share approach double it's current point by end of the year.

glen8 said,
Can't say im that surprised

The mobile phone market has stagnated. Can't really think of anything ground breaking for a good few years. There's been the odd little nice addition, but at the end of the day, smartphones peaked around the iphone 4 and little has changed since.

Spec bumps, bigger screens, better cameras, faster graphics......it still performs the same function. If Microsoft wants to gain real ground, they have to do something nobody else has done before so the consumer thinks "wow, i must buy that"

Totally agree glen. As a consumer I've asked myself that question when my contract expired last December. Should I go with a Windows Phone? What ground breaking features do they really offer? At the end of the day, I just stuck with the two leaders on that chart.

Well when the hardware is all much of a muchness it's down to personal preference. Android had the option of more screen sizes so many people left iPhones for that. High-end Nokia phones have superior camera optics so some people have move to WP for that.

Then again, it's unlikely any OS will have anything groundbreaking, but it's the small things that can add up and make the difference. WP lacking a notification centre was one (controversial as many didn't think it was necessary) feature that I personally find incredibly convenient and without it, it was hard to recommend WP to anyone on Android or iOS. Now there's feature parity there I'd say Live Tiles and now even better Live Folders are one area that maybe isn't groundbreaking but makes using WP more productive, cleaner and more efficient than the other two. Overall I find using WP to be more fun, smooth and enjoyable than my previous Android phones and iOS has come close in user satisfaction, but still lags behind WP.

I feel for most people WP is the better OS and has enough little things to edge it past the other two - although they obviously both have their strengths as well. I wouldn't go ahead and recommend most people switch though, there's personal preference of course and still an issue with some apps and more so games missing. But if that doesn't bother you, then I'd say it's nice to have a change and that's one of the many reasons I switched from Android and don't miss it at all.