Windows RT devices to see slow rollout

According to a new report, Microsoft's ARM partners are running into issues with Windows RT, likely delaying many devices featuring the ARM-powered version of Windows. Of Microsoft's three ARM partners – NVIDIA, Qualcomm and Texas Instruments – NVIDIA is the furthest along because of its previous history developing Windows drivers for its other products.

Brooke Croothers of CNET News reports that Microsoft is slowly dipping its toe in the ARM-powered waters, only allowing a limited amount of devices to use Windows RT. Each ARM developer is being given two "slots," according to Croothers, for ARM device designs. An HP device using a Qualcomm chip will account for one of those device designs, although HP has previously announced it won't have a Windows RT device available for the operating system's launch. An HP spokesperson said this decision was made because of "input from customers" who prefer the "robust and established ecosystem of x86 applications."

Microsoft previously announced that an NVIDIA Tegra processor will power its first tablet, the Windows RT version of Surface. The Windows RT version of Surface is expected to launch alongside Windows RT and Windows 8 sometime in October, although no other Windows RT-powered devices have been announced for a similar launch date. To date, only Surface and an Asus tablet have been officially announced as Windows RT products. Additional devices have been shown at press events, although no official products have been announced.

Source: CNET News

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It's not that I have something against Metro, I don't -- it's just that right now there aren't that many Metro apps. I'm hoping that'll change, 'cause I like Metro, but I would, and will, wait until Metro apps fill the Windows Store.

For the time being I'll use desktop apps, but if there are Metro apps that do the same as desktop apps I'll use the former, specially on a tablet.

Of course it will change - the Operating system is neither finished nor released, and most developers can't even submit their applications to the store right now, given that it's not fully open to everyone yet. And they can't charge for anything until RTM anyway - there's a lot of applications lined up just waiting to burst through the stores gates

~Johnny said,
Of course it will change - the Operating system is neither finished nor released, and most developers can't even submit their applications to the store right now, given that it's not fully open to everyone yet. And they can't charge for anything until RTM anyway - there's a lot of applications lined up just waiting to burst through the stores gates

I hope so! I really want a lot of good Metro apps! I think Metro is cool.

laserfloyd said,
I'll be waiting on Surface Pro. RT just isn't for me, battery life or not.

Wow the only reason why people picked x86 over ARM is to run existing x86 apps on the desktop. Since ARM can't run any of them. Other than that, x86/ARM isn't that much of a big difference since both of them will have 1Ghz processor and the x86 of Surface is running on ULV Core i5 processor.

Chica Ami said,

Wow the only reason why people picked x86 over ARM is to run existing x86 apps on the desktop. Since ARM can't run any of them. Other than that, x86/ARM isn't that much of a big difference since both of them will have 1Ghz processor and the x86 of Surface is running on ULV Core i5 processor.

A 1Ghz i5 is still going to be a damn sight faster than a 1Ghz ARM processor, due to architectural differences. Regardless though, Microsoft have never said they'd be clocked at 1Ghz, nor that both models would be clocked at the same speed.

And I don't think anyone's ever bothered to clock a mobile i5 as low as 1Ghz, the lowest you'd be looking at them clocking the Pro is between 1.6 - 2.1 Ghz, before any possible turbo-boost.

And "other than that", where "that" is basically every single current existing Windows program (outside those shipped with Windows), is a rather big caveat for most people, especially people who work with Windows for a living.

Chica Ami said,

Wow the only reason why people picked x86 over ARM is to run existing x86 apps on the desktop. Since ARM can't run any of them. Other than that, x86/ARM isn't that much of a big difference since both of them will have 1Ghz processor and the x86 of Surface is running on ULV Core i5 processor.

There are a few more differences besides legacy app support:
1) Surface Pro has a 1080p screen, Surface RT is only 1366x768.
2) Surface Pro has a pen digitizer.
3) Surface Pro has USB 3.0 and mini-DisplayPort, can run a 2560x1440 display.

The Surface Pro at launch can be a full ultrabook replacement, thought after maybe 3-4 years, the Surface RT will have access to 90% the apps you'd need to be "fully productive" with the remaining 10% handled by a separate computer or remote desktop.

dagamer34 said,
There are a few more differences besides legacy app support:
1) Surface Pro has a 1080p screen, Surface RT is only 1366x768.

I didn't realise there was a difference in resolution - that's considerably lower pixel density than Google's Nexus 7 (an ultra-budget device). It's completely unnecessary to go that low but I guess they're going for cheap components to make up for the extra cost of the Windows licence.

theyarecomingforyou said,

I didn't realise there was a difference in resolution - that's considerably lower pixel density than Google's Nexus 7 (an ultra-budget device). It's completely unnecessary to go that low but I guess they're going for cheap components to make up for the extra cost of the Windows licence.

That resolution is plenty on tablet device. 1080p is hardly noticeable on those screens. Not to mention the Nexus is 1280x800.

Edited by farmeunit, Jul 2 2012, 3:23am :

laserfloyd said,
I'll be waiting on Surface Pro. RT just isn't for me, battery life or not.

I am actually going to try a surface RT tablet.... just to see if I can make it with just winRT. The 3 month thing would kill me and I doubt we will lose much selling it 3 months later on ebay or another online retailer (and if they do end up being hard to get they could be worth significantly more... I figure its worth the gamble).

dagamer34 said,
There are a few more differences besides legacy app support:.

Actually, there is NO reference to legacy app support on Windows Surface Pro.
The Website reports that ALL Surface tablets will ONLY run apps from the Windows Store.
This is what TPM and Secure boot get you.
I can see Surface Pro being a huge fail if they require code to be Store-signed in order to run.

Once I see verification of Surface Pro running unsigned code, then I'll be convinced.

deadonthefloor said,

Actually, there is NO reference to legacy app support on Windows Surface Pro.
The Website reports that ALL Surface tablets will ONLY run apps from the Windows Store.
This is what TPM and Secure boot get you.
I can see Surface Pro being a huge fail if they require code to be Store-signed in order to run.

Once I see verification of Surface Pro running unsigned code, then I'll be convinced.

The Surface Pro is a standard Intel based PC, running a standard version of Windows 8. It runs everything Windows 7 does. And again, Microsoft have already demonstrated this during the Surface unveil, running desktop programs.

Only the standard WinRT Surface tablet will be restricted to Windows Store applications, like all WinRT devices.

All these is well known. Why you and CNET are reporting this type of old news ?

The Windows RT version of Surface is expected to launch alongside Windows RT and Windows 8 sometime in October, although no other Windows RT-powered devices have been announced for a similar launch date.

Microsoft never said when their Surface tablets are going to launch. Heck, nobody knows when Windows 8 is going to be available yet.

Ricardo Dawkins said,
All these is well known. Why you and CNET are reporting this type of old news ?


Microsoft never said when their Surface tablets are going to launch. Heck, nobody knows when Windows 8 is going to be available yet.


I said "expected." Microsoft said the Windows RT version will launch in "Autumn" and that it will be alongside Windows 8, which most of us speculate to be in October. The Windows 8 version will launch three months later.

The news isn't old, beyond the device amount restrictions. There are problems with the development according to Croothers' sources and NVIDIA is ahead of Qualcomm and TI -- that hasn't been reported before.