Windows Server 2012 now running Bing.com

In late May, Microsoft announced that the release candidate version of Windows Server 2012 was available to download for free. Usually, a release candidate version means that a software product is almost ready for prime time but the company still has a few more bugs to deal with before it makes it official.

However, it looks like Microsoft is confident enough in the current version of Windows Server 2012 that it is already being used by one of its largest public facing divisions. In a post on the official Windows Server blog, Mukul Sabharwal, one of the software development engineers on the Bing team, states:

The promise of the new Windows Server 2012 features intrigued the Bing.com team as we considered migrating to the latest operating system. What began as exploratory evaluations of the impact of a migration quickly led to a full-scale deployment, which benefited greatly from the built-in .NET 4.5 functionality, multicore JIT functionality, and potentially, the much-improved Hyper-V 3 functionality.

The end result of the Bing team's evaluations of Windows Server 2012 is that the release candidate version is now being used by the Bing team. As Sabharwal proudly announces, "All Bing.com search results worldwide are being served by Windows Server 2012!" So keep that in mind when you make a search request on Bing.com; it's currently being generated with help from server software that technically isn't finished yet.

Source: Windows Server blog

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft files patent for detachable smartphone display

Next Story

Microsoft finds a way to create something more offensive than tweet choir

19 Comments

Pretty cool that. I wonder what firewall and IPS systems they use on it, or would be be external hardware for that (as I don't think there's any OS firewalls that support server 2012 yet)

n_K said,
Pretty cool that. I wonder what firewall and IPS systems they use on it, or would be be external hardware for that (as I don't think there's any OS firewalls that support server 2012 yet)

More than likely the firewall is handled by hardware outside of the OS.

n_K said,
Pretty cool that. I wonder what firewall and IPS systems they use on it, or would be be external hardware for that (as I don't think there's any OS firewalls that support server 2012 yet)

This this scale of distribution, there are the Microsoft technologies, but in distribution points, the loop and port providers could be using additional non-Microsoft technology.

Windows 2012 has its own internal firewall system, that is on scale with any dedicated firewall solution. Microsoft also has dedicated firewall and IPS technologies they deploy directly on servers as well as dedicated Windows Server devices for numerous security detection and prevention.

If they are leaving the 2012 firewall on or not probably is irrelevant, but is usually a smart 'additional' level of protection that has a very light load. Anyone out there deploying any server, even with catch and dedicated security servers should almost always leave the integrated OS security features enabled.

Imagine a scenario when a tech is making a quick compensation to infrastructure and accidentally messes up routes or physically patches a server device into a non-isolated network.

PS It is surprising you question what Microsoft would be using for IPS or if there is Firewall technology for 2012. Considering Microsoft is the leading supplier of these and other security technologies, do you honestly think they would be handing this over to another technology company?

Go lookup Forefront, and Windows 2012 server. Even on the 'cheap' and with out of the box features, a small business environment can deploy a public server with security beyond what was even available just a few years ago, let alone in a simple and integrated set of technologies.

In the 'secure' server wars, Windows has more than won, but it will take a while before the industry realizes this.

Sadly, the 'competition' are some of the ones in denial and not moving to meet the security technologies Microsoft has been recreating NT and Windows Server around. So by the time a lot of competitors do see where they are getting hit, and in areas Windows is immune, it might be too late for them to catch up technically.

This last part sounds like hyperbole, but in security and technology history of the past 20 years, this has happened twice already, with Microsoft and even NT itself being severely underestimated. (Novell wrote off Windows NT many times, go find the old tech rags from 1990-1992, and Sun and IBM and others also dismissed NT from claiming it was nothing new to claiming it was too new and all the technologies would never work together.).

Edited by thenetavenger, Jun 10 2012, 9:13pm :

It'd be cool if they released the network/systems architecture that is driving the Bing search engine.

I wonder just how many servers they have for bing, are they talking about just the IIS front end servers or all of the Database servers etc?

It think it's just a marketing gimmick TBH. This goes totally against everything Microsoft preaches in the IT/Server world for best practices. But then again, bing isn't really well thought through either..

xendrome said,
I wonder just how many servers they have for bing, are they talking about just the IIS front end servers or all of the Database servers etc?

It think it's just a marketing gimmick TBH. This goes totally against everything Microsoft preaches in the IT/Server world for best practices. But then again, bing isn't really well thought through either..


Microsoft almost always runs pre-release versions of Windows on their internet facing sites. They used to talk about how they used beta versions of Windows server to power Microsoft.com. I don't know if they still do that though or not.

SharpGreen said,

Microsoft almost always runs pre-release versions of Windows on their internet facing sites. They used to talk about how they used beta versions of Windows server to power Microsoft.com. I don't know if they still do that though or not.

Indeed. This is standard practice with MS. AFAIk, they ran basically all of their front-facing servers on Server 2008 while it was in RC.

xendrome said,

It think it's just a marketing gimmick TBH. This goes totally against everything Microsoft preaches in the IT/Server world for best practices. But then again, bing isn't really well thought through either..

Microsoft dogfoods a lot of their products. One of the best ways to get feedback on how things are running imo.

xendrome said,

It think it's just a marketing gimmick TBH. This goes totally against everything Microsoft preaches in the IT/Server world for best practices.

In these situations, Microsoft takes a "do as I say, not as I do approach. Customers do not want to put their entire business on a Beta server, and Microsoft does not want to be responsible if a not yet finished OS causes a problem, possibly ruining the business. Bing, however, because it is part of Microsoft where the OS developers are there on site with debugging symbols, source code, and the expertise because they wrote the OS, can jump in to fix any possible problems that pop up. Plus, it ensures that the OS can achieve the uptime necessary to run an intensive web application with billions of hits scaled across many servers. It shows that they are confident in the OS, but also are willing to do the testing to make sure it works as it should.

But then again, bing isn't really well thought through either..

Mind sharing your knowledge of the internal workings of Bing to expand on what they do in the network infrastructure that is wrong? If you know how it is not well thought out, you would have no problem explaining it to us.

xendrome said,
I wonder just how many servers they have for bing, are they talking about just the IIS front end servers or all of the Database servers etc?

It think it's just a marketing gimmick TBH. This goes totally against everything Microsoft preaches in the IT/Server world for best practices. But then again, bing isn't really well thought through either..

Having some significant sites testing out the RC with feedback is essential, as stated above, this way a huge website gives Microsoft direct feedback... I wouldn't be supervised if they monitor and test fix problems one of the servers either.

nohone said,

Mind sharing your knowledge of the internal workings of Bing to expand on what they do in the network infrastructure that is wrong? If you know how it is not well thought out, you would have no problem explaining it to us.

I have a feeling you'll be waiting a long time for an answer

xendrome said,
It think it's just a marketing gimmick TBH. This goes totally against everything Microsoft preaches in the IT/Server world for best practices. But then again, bing isn't really well thought through either..

Ya something Microsoft has been doing for over 17 years is just a 'gimmick' and 'new'.

Really? MSN server in 1995 were running on RC versions of Windows NT Server 4.0, and Microsoft has always shoved their technologies into their own infrastructure before the products are final.

It is one of the best test environments, and open up internal testing to the non-programmers working with the new technologies to get direct feedback on what works and what doesn't. Not only do additional modifications in management software get made, but instructional information on how to do 'xyx' that is not ordinary gets worked.

This is not just Windows NT Server technologies Microsoft has done this with either. They have done the 'dog food' as well as created projects around unreleased versions of products.

MSSQL is another 'famous' product for pre-release milestones in technology history. Have you ever seen Google Maps or MSN Maps or Bing Maps?

Back in the 1990s, Microsoft used pre-release versions of MSSQL to showcase how handling terabytes of data in a database was possible and easy to handle.

The project then was called TerraServer, and still exists, and is what the foundation of all satellite mapping was built on.

Just so Microsoft should 'show off' and 'test' both NT and MSSQL when handling massive amounts of data, and back in the mid-90s, a TB was still really large, as the mainstream commercial storage technology was maxing out at 50-100gb, and consumers were still only seeing 8gb hard drives that were fairly expensive.

I was able to find this link, here:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-u...0).aspx#msterra_terraserver

*PS The next time you hear anyone claim Google created 'mapping' or any technology whatsoever, just go find the 'origin' story, and follow up with a business article where Google stepped in and bought the foundation of the technology they are passing off as theirs. (http://www.pcworld.com/article...igital_mapping_company.html)

Edited by thenetavenger, Jun 10 2012, 9:34pm :

voovode said,
Bing.com now running WindowsSever 2012*

Yeah, i was like what tha, lol. Is Bing.com the new kernel or something.

either that or it should say, Windows Server 2012 now runs Bing.com or something else. LOL

To be fair Microsoft have always been pretty good at eating their own dogfood certainly when it comes to running beta or just released versions of their products.

Commenting is disabled on this article.