Windows XP patches can be made after April 8th, but they will be pricey

On April 8th, 2014, Microsoft is supposed to end its official support for Windows XP which launched nearly 12 years ago. After that date, Microsoft will not provide any more public software updates for the OS and has warned Windows XP users that will open up their PCs to "zero day" exploits that could be used by hackers.

While Windows XP patches won't be released to the outside world, that doesn't mean Microsoft won't develop more updates to the OS. Computerworld reports that Microsoft offers something called "Custom Support" that will allow a very few Windows XP machines to keep getting updates. Custom Support is aimed mainly at large businesses.

A data sheet for Custom Service is quoted in the article. It states:

Legacy products or out-of-support service packs covered under Custom Support will continue to receive security hotfixes for vulnerabilities labeled as 'Critical' by the MSRC [Microsoft Security Response Center]. Customers with Custom Support that need security patches defined as 'Important' by MSRC can purchase these for an additional fee.

The report says Microsoft doesn't publish their Custom Service fees publicly, since they are negotiated on a company-by-company basis. Some analysts have speculated that the cost to patch each PC under such a plan is around $200 for the first year, just to get the "Critical" security fixes. In other words, most Windows XP owners would be better off paying for an upgrade to Windows 7 or Windows 8.

Microsoft has not strayed from its message that it will end public support of Windows XP very soon. However, the fact remains that there are a lot of Windows XP users still out there in the world, and there will likely be plenty of them left after the April 8th, 2014 support deadline has come and gone. We will have to see if Microsoft sticks with its deadline or offers up some alternatives for PC owners who simply don't want to stop using the 12 year old OS.

Source: Computerworld | Image via Microsoft

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Makes perfect sense, since these are officially out of support. I.e. to get support, you need to pay Microsoft's developers to fix it, as usual in this business with no support agreement.

Microsoft should hold a funeral for Windows XP just like Apple did for Mac OS 9.

If I were Microsoft, I'd release a patch which pops up a window showing the risks of using such as old OS every time it's booted, and eventually force users to upgrade. XP has so many security holes that WON'T get patched.

I guess Microsoft's dominance in the 90s/2000s is working against them now. Windows XP still does the job for many. The only way you can convince people/companies to upgrade is by making it clear about the security risks.

They could also make a patch so the OS runs in a limited mode (with no internet connectivity) in 2014. Apple were successful with pushing ALL their users from OS 9 to OS X - why can't Microsoft?

Or, how about offering a significant discount to XP users for a Windows 7 or 8 upgrade?

68k said,


They could also make a patch so the OS runs in a limited mode (with no internet connectivity) in 2014.

Or, how about offering a significant discount to XP users for a Windows 7 or 8 upgrade?

Limited mode? That would effectively shutdown many businesses. Never gonna happen. Also, Microsoft offered Windows 8 for under $50 dollars for a while and people still stuck with XP. Not much more they can do.

JHBrown said,
Limited mode? That would effectively shutdown many businesses.
Market share for XP is still relatively high and so is the security risk (with using such an old OS). Unfortunately that won't change overnight. In order to reduce market share rapidly Microsoft don't have much choice but to force users to upgrade. They should give a years notice for users to move up to Windows 7/8. Then, after that period, cut internet connectivity from XP via an update. Then watch the 7/8 market share go up! With the way things are going now, XP market share will still be above 30% in 2020.

It's not just the software upgrade. I actually have seen some companies that still have bulky Celeron processor PCs that were made just at the turn of the millennium on employee's desks.

Their motto is...if we can put band aids on stuff and keep them working...we don't have to buy new PCs. Which includes the fact...if they upgrade to Windows 7 or even Windows 8. These old Celeron processor PCs won't load the OS.

So...if these older PCs are still working...why upgrade the software...that just means...they have to upgrade the PCs in the process.

Edited by texasghost, Aug 29 2013, 2:12am :

Notice how many of your financial institutions, especially banks; and medical organizations, especially group practices that are still using XP for their software. Are they going to go through the needless expense to convert all that software just to work well on Windows-8? Hardly. Windows-7? Probably. Did Microsoft seriously consider those organization's needs when they come up with the Windows-8 UI? No.

TsarNikky said,
Notice how many of your financial institutions, especially banks; and medical organizations, especially group practices that are still using XP for their software. Are they going to go through the needless expense to convert all that software just to work well on Windows-8? Hardly. Windows-7? Probably. Did Microsoft seriously consider those organization's needs when they come up with the Windows-8 UI? No.

You do know that Windows 8 has the traditional desktop environment that everyone is used to for the last 18 years and most apps run just fine on it and function just like the do in Windows XP/Vista/8. Also software if written right should just work on most Windows OS versions unless you are talking directly with hardware (and even then if written correctly, chances are it will still work - if I can program MIDI controllers using Windows XP drivers on my Windows 8 box then someone did something right). It's not all Microsoft's fault that there are incompetent developers and software companies. I develop software myself so I can understand that there are plenty of instances where backwards compatibility gets broken (sometimes in a bad way) but for the most part Windows 8 can run Windows 95 software...

Is Windows XP showing any notification in the system tray that support is ending soon? I'm guessing no. My bet is that a majority of users do not know of the EOL date, unless they visit a tech site like here.

Salty Wagyu said,
Is Windows XP showing any notification in the system tray that support is ending soon? I'm guessing no. My bet is that a majority of users do not know of the EOL date, unless they visit a tech site like here.

A home user will not care or have friends tell them. Any corporate/business user should have IT support/staff that are not asleep.

They'll know soon enough when Windows Updates doesn't give any more updates.

That, and their systems connected to the internet start showing all manner of problems.

Raa said,
They'll know soon enough when Windows Updates doesn't give any more updates.

That, and their systems connected to the internet start showing all manner of problems.

Some don't even install the updates they do get!

warwagon said,

Some don't even install the updates they do get!


Don't remind me. I had an XP SP2 (yes 2) system come in this week for repairs. -_-

What a beautiful desktop. Adding the Royale theme or one of the many other themes from talented people right here on Neowin, made XP wonderful. Windows 8 may be more secure and modern but how can any human being say that Metro or tiles looks better than XP or Vista? A Windows XP with Windows 8 security would please over 99% of the population.

You can keep Royale and Luna, I'll take performance, security and stability any day, never mind all the things XP can't do without help, if at all. (And I can get Royale and Luna on 7 or 8 too if I was feeling nostalgic.)

Max Norris said,
You can keep Royale and Luna, I'll take performance, security and stability any day, never mind all the things XP can't do without help, if at all. (And I can get Royale and Luna on 7 or 8 too if I was feeling nostalgic.)
Max, did you not read my comment? I specifically said Windows XP with the security of Windows 8!!!!!!! I can guarantee you that I am not the minority in this thinking. Hundreds of millions would flock to that operating system, making you the minority.

JHBrown said,
Max, did you not read my comment?

I don't think you read mine as you left off the other important bits, never mind I'm living in reality and not wishful thinking. Even if you lock XP down tight it's still a wreck nowadays.. lacking features, unstable as hell, and just generally unpleasant to work with now. I get not liking 8 out of the box, hell I'm partially one of them (although I just take a few seconds to get it to my liking and move on), but even if I flat out refused to use 8, I'd just go with 7 which is still miles ahead of XP, and as an extra bonus, supported until 2020, and even runs ancient software.

Max Norris said,

I don't think you read mine as you left off the other important bits, never mind I'm living in reality and not wishful thinking. Even if you lock XP down tight it's still a wreck nowadays.. lacking features, unstable as hell, and just generally unpleasant to work with now. I get not liking 8 out of the box, hell I'm partially one of them (although I just take a few seconds to get it to my liking and move on), but even if I flat out refused to use 8, I'd just go with 7 which is still miles ahead of XP, and as an extra bonus, supported until 2020, and even runs ancient software.
Max my friend, all I was saying is that a Windows XP today optimized with the security of Windows 8, would be a hot seller. Look at how many people refuse to leave Windows XP and Windows 7. I get what you're saying though. My comment was hypothetical.

Windows XP with Windows 8 security could never even happen. It would require massive changes to the codebase, and break many things - exactly like Vista did all those years ago.

JHBrown said,
What a beautiful desktop. Adding the Royale theme or one of the many other themes from talented people right here on Neowin, made XP wonderful.

Eh, I'm a fan of Embedded myself. The default Luna isn't bad either.

Dot Matrix said,
Windows XP with Windows 8 security could never even happen. It would require massive changes to the codebase, and break many things - exactly like Vista did all those years ago.
Agree Dot. I was just reminiscing about the overall feel of XP.

And? These patches will be very specific for a company with very specific needs - they will be of no use to "Joe Consumer".

No, they're of use, but they're delivered from your account rep and they have to be installed manually or manually added to your patching solution (WSUS or SCCM, or something 3rd party if that's what an org uses). You also sign an NDA to receive them, and violation will cost your organization big bucks. I'm not entirely sure a leak of a patch for a product out of support has happened before, but I don't remember it happening.

I love XP how looks it, especially Media Center Theme (Royale). Much more than Vista and 7. And still better than 8. I prefer Server 2003 and always I install Royale Theme. Maybe updates for Server 2003 won't stop.

Orlando said,
I love XP how looks it, especially Media Center Theme (Royale). Much more than Vista and 7. And still better than 8. I prefer Server 2003 and always I install Royale Theme. Maybe updates for Server 2003 won't stop.

First thing i always done on any XP system was to grab the Royal theme. Made XP so much more bearable.

Orlando said,
I love XP how looks it, especially Media Center Theme (Royale). Much more than Vista and 7. And still better than 8. I prefer Server 2003 and always I install Royale Theme. Maybe updates for Server 2003 won't stop.

Don't kid yourself mate extended support for 2003 & 2003 R2 ends July 2015.

http://support.microsoft.com/gp/lifean36

Riiight, just shows that you have no idea of the many reasons some companies can't get rid of all XP machines they have.

Odom said,
Riiight, just shows that you have no idea of the many reasons some companies can't get rid of all XP machines they have.

They're just excuses. We never went through this level of whining with any other EOL OS before. They are just clinging to XP, plain and simple.

Right, just excuses. Why don't you come to our company and have a look, we'd be more than happy to hear how you would solve the issues at hand.

More whining.

XP is your security blanket. You've had around 7 years to plan for its replacement and yet you're still here crying for more support because you can't leave XP. Invalid.

How on earth did you ever survive the end of NT 4.0? Or Windows 2000? How tragic was it?

All the solutions are there for you to use, you just refuse to because its easier to cling to XP and demand Microsoft keep holding your hand by supporting their 12 year old software.

I have already attended a presentation from Microsoft about their "extended support" and the 200$ per system are not accurate. The figures we got from them was, for a company that still has <100 machines on XP to be migrated, the cost would be in the region of 30.000€ to 70.000€ per year. With this you get a one time patch developed for free. Any others after that you will have to pay per patch and then you pay a set amount per machine on top of it.
For companies with >100 XP machines to be migrated you are looking at 6 figures yearly costs.

Lord Method Man said,
More whining.

XP is your security blanket. You've had around 7 years to plan for its replacement and yet you're still here crying for more support because you can't leave XP. Invalid.

How on earth did you ever survive the end of NT 4.0? Or Windows 2000? How tragic was it?

All the solutions are there for you to use, you just refuse to because its easier to cling to XP and demand Microsoft keep holding your hand by supporting their 12 year old software.

I'm not whining about clinging to XP, I'm just trying to tell you that not everything in the world can be upgraded. I know plenty of companies (factories) that run old software on XP because that software does not run on any other OS. You cannot upgrade that software, because the companies that created it do not exist anymore, yet that software is still required to run the industrial machines. Not everyone is going to splash out a couple million € to buy industrial machines just because an OS reached the end of its lifecycle.

+Odom
Right, just excuses. Why don't you come to our company and have a look, we'd be more than happy to hear how you would solve the issues at hand.

The only legit reason I've heard for having to run Windows XP was because the person needed to use specific *serial port* with a Windows XP only software solution. The hardware took advantage of a quirk in the serial port that emulators don't reproduce, so they had to run XP on the hardware directly. There's very few businesses that have that issue, and even fewer that cannot solve the problem in 7 years.

Odom said,

I'm not whining about clinging to XP, I'm just trying to tell you that not everything in the world can be upgraded. I know plenty of companies (factories) that run old software on XP because that software does not run on any other OS. You cannot upgrade that software, because the companies that created it do not exist anymore, yet that software is still required to run the industrial machines. Not everyone is going to splash out a couple million € to buy industrial machines just because an OS reached the end of its lifecycle.


Naturally, the people owning these machines should do a cost-benefit analysis to having exploits (if the machine is in a safe somewhere, disconnected from the internet, this risk is probably low), paying for support, or upgrading. Microsoft is, however, doing the reasonable thing by ending the product's life, as it and technology in general has moved on.

Yes, I fully agree with you. The only message I'm trying to get across is that there is not a solution/replacement for everything.
I've been to conferences about this topic and the consensus of the affected companies is to not pay Microsoft for the support, but rather to put part of that money into isolating and protecting those machines that cannot be replaced.

Lord Method Man said,
More whining.

XP is your security blanket. You've had around 7 years to plan for its replacement and yet you're still here crying for more support because you can't leave XP. Invalid.

How on earth did you ever survive the end of NT 4.0? Or Windows 2000? How tragic was it?

All the solutions are there for you to use, you just refuse to because its easier to cling to XP and demand Microsoft keep holding your hand by supporting their 12 year old software.

Not every business is the same. I'm not saying we shouldn't change to Win7/8, but there are a lot of concerns that a lot of people don't think about when suggesting that all businesses have had ample time to do so.

I work in a bank, to a normal banking customer a lot of them thinks a bank only has a system in the backend that does everything, when in fact we have about 50+ systems doing a variety of work. Every time there is a small patch in the application itself we test extremely aggressively, because ONE bug may mean catastrophe. Recent example, ICBC, the BIGGEST bank in the world ranked by Forbes in 2013, they had a db2 database upgrade that went wrong and the bank's channels were affected for close to an hour, total blackout of service. This was an update from IBM that has been live for 15 months, rigorously tested for at least a year and the end result, catastrophic.

Now imagine doing UAT on all 50+ systems. We want to do it, we in IT we want to use the newest and latest, at home I ordered the Win8 digital version when it was available, at work testing machines we have a couple running the latest, but the cost to migrate all the bank's systems to go from XP to say Win7 is astronomical. Almost all the systems don't support beyond XP for a variety of reason, and for our bank (a tiny bank with around 60 branches so far), estimated cost for changing to Win7 including licenses, purchase of new hardware etc is in the 7 figure range.

Odom said,

I'm not whining about clinging to XP, I'm just trying to tell you that not everything in the world can be upgraded. I know plenty of companies (factories) that run old software on XP because that software does not run on any other OS. You cannot upgrade that software, because the companies that created it do not exist anymore, yet that software is still required to run the industrial machines. Not everyone is going to splash out a couple million € to buy industrial machines just because an OS reached the end of its lifecycle.

Closed industrial equipment in a factory should not have external access and thus should NOT NEED continual security patches.

There are some reasons that companies are clinging to XP, but this is not one of them. There are companies running NT 4 on closed systems as well, there is no need to replace the OS nor is it an issue as they are either isolated or network isolated and can not be exploited by external factors.

Lord Method Man said,
$200 per year per system sounds like a good "stupidity tax" to pay for organizations still clinging to XP.

There are many reasons why companies and/or individuals choose to remain with Windows XP.
- Application compatibility
- Usability
- Familiarity
- Relative stability

Although it is undoubtedly not as secure as Vista or later, efforts can be made to circumvent various attacks, such as changing Internet Options to be more secure, enabling hardware DEP for all programs (if possible), installing a two-way firewall, and a real-time anti-malware program, such as Avira.

Odom said,
Right, just excuses. Why don't you come to our company and have a look, we'd be more than happy to hear how you would solve the issues at hand.

That just means that your CIO or IT people and management made very poor decisions to tie mission-critical functions or applications to a specific OS. This is information that has been public for many years, no-one thought that just maybe it might be a good idea to start working on fixing the issue?

Odom said,

I'm not whining about clinging to XP, I'm just trying to tell you that not everything in the world can be upgraded. I know plenty of companies (factories) that run old software on XP because that software does not run on any other OS. You cannot upgrade that software, because the companies that created it do not exist anymore, yet that software is still required to run the industrial machines. Not everyone is going to splash out a couple million € to buy industrial machines just because an OS reached the end of its lifecycle.

Well, I hope everyone at your company learnt their lesson for placing their bets on a closed source operating system and on closed source products. The companies that made the closed source products themselves placed their bets on MSFT, and unsurprisingly, they are no more, forgotten, like Nokia will be soon as well.

Whining is pretty much all you can do when the MSFT tax collectors come calling and start circling your wagons. Just be thankful they haven't busted in your doors and taken you hostage yet.

https://groups.google.com/foru...egal/MIWj0z2RhMs[1-25-false]

My company is in the exact same situation. We are a fortune 100 company with over 250K workstations currently running XP. We just cannot run out and upgrade to 7/8. We have been planning for over 2 years now for upgrading to Win 7 but it is not a fast or fun process.

Odom said,

I'm not whining about clinging to XP, I'm just trying to tell you that not everything in the world can be upgraded. I know plenty of companies (factories) that run old software on XP because that software does not run on any other OS. You cannot upgrade that software, because the companies that created it do not exist anymore, yet that software is still required to run the industrial machines. Not everyone is going to splash out a couple million € to buy industrial machines just because an OS reached the end of its lifecycle.

Oh indeed, however machines like that are likely not on the internet, or even networked.

Where my Dad works still has some 16+ year old PC's running Windows NT 4, the sole task of the machine is to run some expensive machinery.

recursive said,

Well, I hope everyone at your company learnt their lesson for placing their bets on a closed source operating system and on closed source products. The companies that made the closed source products themselves placed their bets on MSFT, and unsurprisingly, they are no more, forgotten, like Nokia will be soon as well.

Whining is pretty much all you can do when the MSFT tax collectors come calling and start circling your wagons. Just be thankful they haven't busted in your doors and taken you hostage yet.

https://groups.google.com/foru...egal/MIWj0z2RhMs[1-25-false]

Do you have ANY idea how many systems have been discontinued because of hardware and software support that was solely based on OSS?

Just look at RedHat solutions as a 'basic' example. They DO NOT maintain older Linux builds or the equipment that cannot run newer builds.

Newer Linux distributions are walking away from older hardware faster and hardware is walking away from Linux faster than Windows 8.

Another example is the looming problem of Android and how it has already moved away from supporting older hardware and will be unable to maintain hardware support for current dual-core generations and remain performance competitive.

Android is OSS and is walking away from older hardware.

http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20130826PD209.html

OSS and legacy and older hardware support is mythical. It is also a horrible security issue that has been hitting the Internet over the past 3 years.

There are so many OSS appliance systems that WILL NEVER be updated and are highly insecure and being targeted as bots. The Cache servers, the web servers, the routers, etc are a big problem for smaller companies that cannot afford to replace the units with another 'expensive' appliance solution, and that is even if the company support the hardware is still in operation.

Linux and other OSS routers on the Internet have been a primary target for bots and source malware infections as they do not have the 'updates' available from the vendor that have either gone out of business or choose to stop supporting the units and instead offering a new model as the only 'secure' solution for customers.

OSS in 'theory' could be maintained longer, but in reality THIS DOES NOT HAPPEN.

If want long term support you go to companies like Microsoft or IBM, and even with something like IBM AS/400 lineage, the hardware maintenance costs and upgrades have been 10-100 times upgrading the same hardware if it was Windows based.

Edited by Mobius Enigma, Aug 28 2013, 9:26pm :

#Michael said,
My company is in the exact same situation. We are a fortune 100 company with over 250K workstations currently running XP. We just cannot run out and upgrade to 7/8. We have been planning for over 2 years now for upgrading to Win 7 but it is not a fast or fun process.

If you company's IT people are incapable of offering a simple and automated migration solution 4 years after Windows 7 was released, then you company needs to contract with EDS/HP or another company that specializes in support and migration.

Most cases like yours I have worked with are sad, as the IT people in charge have mislead the management and wasted company resources that exceed the costs that could have been given over to an IT company that knows what they are doing and fully migrated systems and solutions for a fraction of the costs these companies have wasted on XP and the IT people keeping these systems running.

Mobius Enigma said,

Closed industrial equipment in a factory should not have external access and thus should NOT NEED continual security patches.

There are some reasons that companies are clinging to XP, but this is not one of them. There are companies running NT 4 on closed systems as well, there is no need to replace the OS nor is it an issue as they are either isolated or network isolated and can not be exploited by external factors.

I agree to a point, but we have some Biomedical analysers that can only interface with Windows XP (or some even worse, still stuck on W2k) and due to the maker of said equipment (who we are OEM for) not finalising validation and gaining approval for the FDA they still need to run in a validated state and allow connectivity, while we can isolate them from our LAN, it doesn't cover a) data transcription b) AV security or c) the need for end users to plug in USB sticks to transfer said data from the analysers. Not everyone can/has the luxury to just say, scrap those £2m (each)worth of old analysers and if the OEM doesn't modernise them we will pull using them...losing approx. £50m revenue a year from said manufacturer.

I wish it was as simple as binning XP totally, my professional IT life would be a walk in the park if we could comply!

As from April 2014, Yes XP on a corp lan is a business risk and security risk, try telling that to the FDs and MDs who see IT as a cost, and not a value added service, IT doesn't make them money in their blinkered eyes, only costs them.
The best I/we can hope for is a system replacement program to replace what we can before April 2014 to migitate the level of risk to an acceptable degree, not perfect but the best we can achieve with the resources and funds available to us.

and btw, I'm not talking about a small tin pot company here, were talking a multinational corporation with over £1bn revenue annually (UK Division only), who shall remain nameless.

Edited by Mando, Aug 28 2013, 9:43pm :

Odom said,
Riiight, just shows that you have no idea of the many reasons some companies can't get rid of all XP machines they have.

Other than mission critical hardware that can't be upgraded and will not work with any other OS and there is no way to get (even custom) drivers made for it, please name reason.

Mobius Enigma said,

If you company's IT people are incapable of offering a simple and automated migration solution 4 years after Windows 7 was released, then you company needs to contract with EDS/HP or another company that specializes in support and migration.

Most cases like yours I have worked with are sad, as the IT people in charge have mislead the management and wasted company resources that exceed the costs that could have been given over to an IT company that knows what they are doing and fully migrated systems and solutions for a fraction of the costs these companies have wasted on XP and the IT people keeping these systems running.

You can't think it is that simple. I am talking about a fortune 100 company that at any one time employes around 150K people worldwide and around 250K workstations. A migration like that doesn't happen overnight.

Mando said,

I agree to a point, but we have some Biomedical analysers that can only interface with Windows XP (or some even worse, still stuck on W2k) and due to the maker of said equipment (who we are OEM for) not finalising validation and gaining approval for the FDA they still need to run in a validated state and allow connectivity, while we can isolate them from our LAN, it doesn't cover a) data transcription b) AV security or c) the need for end users to plug in USB sticks to transfer said data from the analysers. Not everyone can/has the luxury to just say, scrap those £2m (each)worth of old analysers and if the OEM doesn't modernise them we will pull using them...losing approx. £50m revenue a year from said manufacturer.

There are odd situations that do exist. We developed software for the ISS that had to be rated on Windows 3.1 and 486 class processors, and this was in 1999. The CPU had to be 'space' approved and tested to survive the radiation levels.

However, this was a closed system, and security to these types of systems should be 'physical' access rated.

It is this type of 'unique' situations that will require longer term support from Microsoft, and they do provide this, even though it gets increasingly expensive.

On government certified systems like you talk about get very direct Microsoft attention, even if the Vendor fails to provide the long term support needed. Microsoft will come in and migrate these types of systems and assist in the recertification process.

I would imagine that the biomedical systems you are specifically referencing, there is already an approved replacement and migration available.

Microsoft was careful with Windows 7 and Windows 8 to ensure that companies could migrate these systems to a virtualized environment during the transition.

Microsoft provides VirtualPC/XP Mode and HyperV on Windows 8 that have full peripheral support and seamless Disk to VHD transition processes. These virtualized XP systems can even be secured so that they are governed by Win7 or Win8's peripheral and network stacks so any XP flaw is no longer a security concern as they no longer can be used as external entry points.

As for companies dealing with Workstation migration, which is what a lot of people consider, there are few systems that are 15 years and newer that do not allow 1gb of RAM and have a socket that supports a 1ghz processor.

Windows 8 with 1gb of RAM on a 1ghz processor runs faster than XP, so it is not a performance issue.

Sadly there is less of a movement to migrate to Windows 8, which is a better solutions for older equipment than Windows 7. The lack of information about Windows 8 has hurt, few know about the low RAM mode and most don't realize it no longer truly requires a DX9 compliant GPU and still retains the desktop Composer as it can run on the CPU if needed.

#Michael said,

You can't think it is that simple. I am talking about a fortune 100 company that at any one time employes around 150K people worldwide and around 250K workstations. A migration like that doesn't happen overnight.

No, it usually takes about 2 - 2.5 years. Hopefully you are almost done, otherwise you are indeed probably doing something wrong.

recursive said,

Well, I hope everyone at your company learnt their lesson for placing their bets on a closed source operating system and on closed source products. The companies that made the closed source products themselves placed their bets on MSFT, and unsurprisingly, they are no more, forgotten, like Nokia will be soon as well.

Whining is pretty much all you can do when the MSFT tax collectors come calling and start circling your wagons. Just be thankful they haven't busted in your doors and taken you hostage yet.

https://groups.google.com/foru...egal/MIWj0z2RhMs[1-25-false]

Can I have the three minutes it took me to read this back please? Such drivel...

#Michael said,

You can't think it is that simple. I am talking about a fortune 100 company that at any one time employes around 150K people worldwide and around 250K workstations. A migration like that doesn't happen overnight.

Yes it really can be that simple.

We have worked with EDS/HP and assisted in the migration of a couple of million workstations and servers.

If your company needs help, and is large, you need to bring in an IT team that specializes in support and migration.

I can have a deployment manager contact you if you really find this problem too overwhelming. There are resources out there for your management as well.

Start with HP Enterprise Services, the current incarnation of HP/EDS.

The last team I worked with did a migration for Shell and their subsides. That project alone was over 150,000 employees, several thousand servers, and over a half a million workstations. HP isn't the only solution out there, but I know they could handle anything you have to throw at them.

As I said before keeping outdated hardware and software running has a cost that starts to increase as the systems get older. There are also costs with the loss in functionality and productivity that the newer systems offer.

In delaying your company's migration from XP to Windows 7 it has probably easily eaten the costs it would have taken to pay a consulting group like HP along with the hardware and OS upgrades.

I only use HP Enterprise/EDS as an example, there are other companies that are just as proficient and can do the heavy lifting just as well.

Are people saying it is an overnight process?

People really should have been planning on upgrading to Windows 7 since it came out. That is almost 4 years ago. If you have not been able to upgrade in 4 years, then something is not right. Even if you were waiting for Service Pack 1, you should have had at least a plan and got the process started.

#Michael said,

You can't think it is that simple. I am talking about a fortune 100 company that at any one time employes around 150K people worldwide and around 250K workstations. A migration like that doesn't happen overnight.

That is exactly the case, this sunset date for XP has been known for many, many years. If the IT dept for a Fortune 100 company is so dysfunctional that they are not able to make plans for OS migrations over a 2-4 year process, then there are serious issues in the leadership in my humble opinion.

Not calling out anyone specific, but to be honest, these kind of OS migrations should be EASIER for larger companies because they have the dedicated IT departments as opposed to the SMB companies that don't.

Agh, just looking at the screenshot reminded my how ugly XP is. I remember loving that interface, but looking back, not anymore.

LightEco said,
Agh, just looking at the screenshot reminded my how ugly XP is. I remember loving that interface, but looking back, not anymore.

They should've made the Media Center theme the default. This used to be the first thing I would do on a new box - couldn't stand the default theme ever...

LightEco said,
Agh, just looking at the screenshot reminded my how ugly XP is. I remember loving that interface, but looking back, not anymore.

The Windows Classic theme never ages. Eye candy used to interest me, but not anymore. I disable all visual effects for maximum speed. I do so when I'm on a Mac too - opening windows in OS X and minimizing/maximizing from the Dock seems to take forever (by default) - how can power users put up with that?

It doesn't have to be a zero day exploit if patches have stopped. In fact it's the well known ones you'll have to worry about because those end up in the hands of script kiddies.