WinRAR 5.00 Final

WinRAR is an archiving utility that completely supports RAR and ZIP archives and is able to unpack CAB, ARJ, LZH, TAR, GZ, ACE, UUE, BZ2, JAR, ISO, 7Z, Z archives. It consistently makes smaller archives than the competition, saving disk space and transmission costs. WinRAR offers you the benefit of industry strength archive encryption using AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) with a key of 128 bits. It supports files and archives up to 8,589 billion gigabytes in size. It also offers the ability to create self extracting and multi volume archives. With recovery record and recovery volumes, you can reconstruct even physically damaged archives.

Download: WinRAR 5.00 32-bit | WinRAR 5.00 64-bit | ~1.9 MB (Shareware)
View: WinRAR Website | Changelog

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Intel shows off SSD overclocking in public for the first time

Next Story

Leaked Nokia 'Bandit' screenshot shows Windows Phone for large screens

13 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Size - 1.36 GB (1,464,979,456 bytes)
Files and Folders - 101 Files, 0 Folders

4.2 - Compressing - 5m 11.5s - size 1.36 GB (1,463,250,944 bytes)
5.0 - Compressing - 5m 11.2s - size 1.36 GB (1,463,250,944 bytes)

4.2 - Deompressing - 41.2s
5.0 - Decompressing - 38.8s

I'm still a little confused. Are you saying that WinRar 5 extracts ALL files faster than 4.20, or is it just for the files compressed using this new version 5 algorithm? Basically, will older files compressed using the older method extract any faster or not?

Nice to see WinRAR finally get modern compression ratios.

However, I don't think it'll be widely used since there are so many "classic" versions floating around, much like the situation with WinZIP's new algorithm. Things get even more complicated as the RAR5 format uses the old .rar extension, so the receiving person may be in for a bad surprise by the time the archive is about to be actually opened. This would've been less confusing if they had introduced a .rar5 extension.

I'll probably stay with 7-zip here, which also got better multithreaded performance with the new LZMA2 algorithm (along with less of a compression penalty on files tough to compress), and had good compression ratio to begin with. I'll give it to WinRAR for supporting recovery records though, which the 7z format doesn't.

I don't care about compressing files that much, but is 5.0 faster in extracting files compared to 4.20? Both on 64 Bit Win7 with Intel Core 2 Duo 2.4ghz and 4gb ram. I thought I read somewhere that 5.0 takes advantage of multi-cores more so than 4.2 did, if it did at all, which I am unclear about.

Hmmmm not sure I get the upgrade from 4.2 to 5.0... in fact, my 'test' increased the file size of those archives created in 5.0...

Somewhere I saw that version 5 is slightly slower than 4.2 'cause of the new feature... Is it true? Does someone know technical details to tell us for sure?

Given this new feature won't be useful for at least some time -until it become widespread and people start using it... do you think would be wise to stay with 4.2 for a while?

Edited by PC EliTiST, Sep 3 2013, 11:58am :

What is the "new feature"? I think it'd help if you actually explain what you are on about.

If you are referring to the new RAR archive version, it's really simple - keep on using the older format in 5.0 (it's still available).

PC EliTiST said,
Somewhere I saw that version 5 is slightly slower than 4.2 'cause of the new feature... Is it true? Does someone know technical details to tell us for sure?

Given this new feature won't be useful for at least some time -until it become widespread and people start using it... do you think would be wise to stay with 4.2 for a while?

RAR5 is supposed to compress and extract faster since it scales better on multi-core CPUs but it certainly uses more resources overall.

I have an almost 5 year old Core 2 Duo and WinRAR 5 seems better overall when using to the new RAR5 format. It does use a lot more RAM both for compressing and decompressing although that is expected with the much bigger dictionary sizes offered in RAR5. It also has much better multicore support and uses both cores on my CPU making compression of large text files quite a bit quicker than before.

On the whole it is a pretty good upgrade from 4.20 and I would suggest you give it a try.

Thanks, mate. I already did the upgrade, but I don't know how to test it and where to find relatively large compressed files that use this new format -but anyway. I don't mind at all if it uses more RAM.