World IPv6 Day went mostly smoothly, with some glitches

On June 8th, as previously reported by Neowin and other sites, hundreds of web sites participated in a 24-hour trial of IPv6. The new version allows practically unlimited IP addresses and better performance compared to IPv4. According to Ars Technica, the test day went smoothly for users. However, sites did have some problems.

One mobile operator in Europe had issues with their website. Apparently, the CEO learned about the World IPv6 Day 24 hours before the event. He instructed his engineers to make the switch, leading to the site being unreachable for most of the day after efforts failed.

Facebook got its IPv6 address a few minutes before midnight Zulu Time and remained unreachable for a few minutes. Facebook disappeared from the DNS again, then came back half an hour later. Facebook had no further issues. Depending on the DNS caching of the servers involved, the operating system, and applications used, updates took anywhere from a few minutes to half an hour or more.

It seems safe to say that adding IPv6 addresses to websites does not kill the Internet. Some participants, such as www.xbox.com, have decided to keep their IPv6 addresses. An obvious next step would be to get more native IPv6 on the ground to consumers. That will not be easy, but keeping IPv4 will not be feasible when the addresses have run out.

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22 Comments

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IPv6 will offer a big advantage for tracking since more organizations will be able to have a unique Internet IP for each computer rather than using NAT for everything.

I really hope ISPs will start providing IPv6 addresses soon.

Chugworth said,
IPv6 will offer a big advantage for tracking since more organizations will be able to have a unique Internet IP for each computer rather than using NAT for everything.

I really hope ISPs will start providing IPv6 addresses soon.

And I guess each customer of an ISP will be given a permanent address.. probably would do a bit to discourage piracy

hell with ipV6, i just want Comcast to get with the channel bonding here where I live so I can get faster speeds on just the package I already have.

As long as you can get protocol 41 through your router, if does not support direct forward of it quite often dmz works. You can get a free tunnel over at hurricane electric. http://www.he.net/ Once you have your tunnel up you can do their certification test and learn about ipv6 if you make sage level you can get a free t-shirt Which is pretty much about the best thing about running Ipv6 currently -- its a play thing for sure, and interesting and all but currently there is no actual reason to run it other than saying you are.. Its going to be YEARS and YEARS before it actual mainstream.

so if I tunnel with IPv6 I can reach xbox.com in IPv6?? No idea how to tunnel though, I do know my router and virgin cable don't support IPv6.

cralias said,
We need more lightbulbs to have addresses from public IPv6 space!

Lol wouldn't be surprised, one day... Both the bulb and socket mind you!

pasty2k2 said,

Lol wouldn't be surprised, one day... Both the bulb and socket mind you!

NXP Semiconductors already thinks quite along those lines. Search for NXP and IPv6 on your favorite search engine.

And now just imagine LulzSec (or whatever) switching off your toilet bulb at night (and consequences) - for teh lulz

"but keeping IPv4 will not be feasible when the addresses have run out."
When? I'm pretty sure I've read at least 5 articles on neowin stating they HAVE ran out, please get your facts right before publishing them?

n_K said,
"but keeping IPv4 will not be feasible when the addresses have run out."
When? I'm pretty sure I've read at least 5 articles on neowin stating they HAVE ran out, please get your facts right before publishing them?

I think he means before isp's run out of addresses for their customers. I'm sure they bought much more than the number of clients they have, so they'll be covered for a while.

n_K said,
"but keeping IPv4 will not be feasible when the addresses have run out."
When? I'm pretty sure I've read at least 5 articles on neowin stating they HAVE ran out, please get your facts right before publishing them?

I'm sure the block apple is sitting on that they bought when the net was started has a LOT of unused addresses they bought a block of 16.8 million addresses... even for a company their size, they'd never use 1 million of them... too many squatters

Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,

I'm sure the block apple is sitting on that they bought when the net was started has a LOT of unused addresses they bought a block of 16.8 million addresses... even for a company their size, they'd never use 1 million of them... too many squatters

Even if Apple and the various other companies donated those addresses back, it would only delay the exhaustion by a few weeks at best.

n_K said,
"but keeping IPv4 will not be feasible when the addresses have run out."
When? I'm pretty sure I've read at least 5 articles on neowin stating they HAVE ran out, please get your facts right before publishing them?
I think it's you who needs to get your facts right. IPv4 exaustion as reported means that globally there are no more IPv4 address blocks to allocate to regional Internet registries (RIR's). RIR's are running low but are not out yet. After RIR's run out it's the organisations and ISP's who will allocate all the addresses out to end nodes that will eventually mean there are no longer any free IPv4 addresses to use.

n_K said,
"but keeping IPv4 will not be feasible when the addresses have run out."
When? I'm pretty sure I've read at least 5 articles on neowin stating they HAVE ran out, please get your facts right before publishing them?
The gas tank is empty. What's left in the line between it and the pump is another story.

Kushan said,

Even if Apple and the various other companies donated those addresses back, it would only delay the exhaustion by a few weeks at best.

yes, but the point is there is littearly hundreds of millions of addresses out there that arn't even being used and squatted on

The amount that are unused and in a contiguous block so that its technically possible to return them to the pool is so small it would only extend the 'deadline' by a month or two, its not worth it.