World's largest video game collection goes up for auction

Michael Thomasson is the official holder of the Guinness World Record for the largest video game collection in the world. If you're as jealous of him as we are, this could be your lucky day.

As of last year, when Guinness World Records verified his achievement, Thomasson owned 10,607 games. Since then, his collection has expanded even further, growing to over 11,000 games. As Kotaku reports, more than 2,600 of these are "factory shrink-wrapped", and a further 8,300 or so are complete with both the original box and manual. 

Now, the entire collection is going up for auction, which means that you could soon be the owner of thousands of games from an extraordinary range of systems, including the Commodore 64, original Microsoft Xbox, BBC Micro, Sega Pico, Sinclair ZX Spectrum, Sony PSP, Neo-Geo CD, and dozens more.

You'll need some pretty deep pockets to even think about making a bid, though. Since the auction opened at $1, bids have climbed rapidly, approaching $100,000 at time of publication - but even this immense sum is below the reserve price. Thomasson says that the lot "has a conservative realistic reserve below its appraised value". 

Given the extraordinary commitment and dedication it must take to amass such a collection over time, you may well be wondering why Thomasson has decided to sell it. It all comes down to a question of priorities; in his words: "I simply have an immediate family and extended family that have needs to be addressed. While I do not wish to part with these games, I have responsibilities that I have made to others and this action is how I will help meet them." 

Family should always come first, of course, so we certainly understand his decision - and he remains optimistic that he may yet be able to build his collection once more: "No worries, I've sold my collection many times in the past and still managed to capture Guinness' attention, and it is entirely possible that I may again."

The auction is being hosted over at GameGavel.com, and closes on Sunday June 15 at 2230 PDT. That should hopefully give you just enough time to sell your house, car, family, and any body organs you don't need, to guarantee you the winning bid. 

Source: GameGavel.com via Kotaku | images via Michael Thommason/GameGavel.com

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sanctified said,
Auction is right now at almost 250,000, he might even get back his entire investment.

From what I see it's like $90,000 and some. Some of the bids must have been questioned or thrown out for not following the listed interval rule.

Gerowen said,

From what I see it's like $90,000 and some. Some of the bids must have been questioned or thrown out for not following the listed interval rule.

Yes, it's back at the 90+ range. The latest bid must have been a joke.

Good luck to him. I cannot imagine having 11,000 games.. If he paid an everage of 30-40 a game he spent at least 400K.

Edited by Deihmos, Jun 7 2014, 2:51pm :

As much as i like games, i can never imagine myself spending that much!
And the current bid is at $90,251...!!! Lets see how this will end.

Although I have switched to digital only this generation, there is something very special about those old cartridges and the boxes/manuals they came with.

Yes, they were all annoying.
As a kid, sure, it was VERY exciting to open it and feel like you got a present, but it's not really because of the medium, it's because we were kids. Even back then, though, I realized how ridiculously expensive games were. I mean RIDICULOUSLY, like $90 where I live (where salaries are several times lower than in US) and back in the late '80s and early '90s! Hardly anyone where I live could afford to actually buy and own many console games (NES, Mega Drive / Genesis, etc.). Instead, we had a couple of games (or just one) that we traded for others (only of equivalent value), for an ever increasing fee, every once in a while. Still, those were "the good old days".

Edited by audioman, Jun 7 2014, 1:10pm :

Enron said,
Although I have switched to digital only this generation, there is something very special about those old cartridges and the boxes/manuals they came with.

I personally loved the art on the cartridges, and flipping through manuals with lots of the concept/original artist renderings of characters, monsters, and locations. It did something to add to the immersion in, say, 8-/16-bit RPGs.

I mean, this was back in a time where a game might come with a full-color walkthrough book and reference guide (some RPGs did this), and of course the epic absurdity of the encyclopedia that came with Carmen Sandiego--it was nuts. The game wasn't the cartridge/diskette/disc at that point. And it was great.

I can't imagine books like that coming with, say, an MMO, as interesting as it would be to have essentially an atlas/hitchhiker's guide to those massive fictional worlds.

Special in that you didn't have to wait to download 20GB from Steam first even though you bought a physical disc!!!

I realize 20GB was unheard of back in the days of disks or even CDs.. But still you get my point.

statm1 said,
Special in that you didn't have to wait to download 20GB from Steam first even though you bought a physical disc!!!

I realize 20GB was unheard of back in the days of disks or even CDs.. But still you get my point.

Moot argument. Having a disc still means downloading just as many gigs in updates before you can start playing.

Joshie said,

Moot argument. Having a disc still means downloading just as many gigs in updates before you can start playing.


Unless a server requires a specific version before it will let you play on Multiplayer, you can still play regardless.

statm1 said,

Unless a server requires a specific version before it will let you play on Multiplayer, you can still play regardless.

I think the point they're getting at is that nowadays games are really rushed out in an attempt to meet deadlines. Game developers are just churning out games as fast as they can because they know that if there's any game breaking bugs they can just release a patch to fix it later, instead of taking their time and doing it right to begin with. If games had been as poor on older consoles as some games are now, a lot of companies would have gone out of business.

Gerowen said,

I think the point they're getting at is that nowadays games are really rushed out in an attempt to meet deadlines. Game developers are just churning out games as fast as they can because they know that if there's any game breaking bugs they can just release a patch to fix it later, instead of taking their time and doing it right to begin with. If games had been as poor on older consoles as some games are now, a lot of companies would have gone out of business.

A lot of companies did go out of business. The 80s and 90s are a graveyard of failed game/software companies. The lucky ones were bought out.