Xbox One lacks proper storage management; Microsoft says it is 'automatic'

Microsoft will ship the Xbox One to customers on Friday with a built in 500GB hard drive that's been designed not to be removed or upgraded. At first, the company announced that the console would support adding external storage but later said the feature would not be available for launch.

Now the first reviews of the Xbox One have come in and they have confirmed that the console will not allow owners to view just how much useable storage space is available on the hard drive. Eurogamer's review of the console states:

With Forza 5 and Ryse installed to the hard drive, in addition to a number of other review titles, our concern now is all about storage management. Here's where things get a little strange. As far as we can tell, there is no storage overview to tell you how much hard drive space remains or allow you to delete items in one centralized location. There also appears to be no direct access to save games, either - these and game DVR upload clips appear to be synced with the cloud. It's interesting that in what is the most ambitious console operating system ever produced, the user seems more remote than ever from content.

It's a feature that's available on the Xbox 360, as shown above, and Sony's PlayStation 4 also has a way to view how much free space is left on its 500GB hard drive.

Neowin contacted Microsoft to ask why the Xbox One lacks a traditional storage viewing or management features. We received a response from a Microsoft spokesperson:

Xbox One was designed to make storage management automatic. For saved games, settings, and other information that Xbox One customers save to the cloud, space is virtually unlimited. On the internal hard drive in each Xbox One, games and apps can be uninstalled or reinstalled instantly with the click of the Xbox One menu button. Saved games and settings information is retrieved from the cloud for any game as its being reinstalled. By being smart about how storage is managed, Xbox One keeps everyone playing, watching, and sharing their entertainment content rather than worry about limitations. You can also see how much storage any app uses by pressing the menu button on that app.

There also no word yet on just how much of the 500GB hard drive is actually useable out of the box, with no game or app installs. We have emailed Microsoft for comment but have yet to receive a response.

The bottom line is that people who get their console on Friday will not have a direct way to know if that long awaited game they are installing on their hard drive will be able to fit alongside all the other games and content they have already saved. Considering that some Xbox One launch titles have large install footprints, up to 43GB in one case, that could be a big problem in the near future.

Images via Microsoft

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Hello,

I have a question. MS said that game saves are stored in the cloud. What happens when you dont know internet access??

This is what MS should do with XBOX One.

Stick 2TB HDD
Don't charge people for online service
Support external drive
Remove all Skype and other bloatware crap from it.
Remove all DRM bull**** in it.
Let people play games and enjoy themselves.

Well... maybe not strip it completely from features, cause some of them I like...
But I like to have A CHOICE... I hate when someone decides FOR ME or tells me - don't ask, cause this is good for you. But when I ask "what is good for me" I don't get an answer or just an evil grin.
I would like to Recommend all the "likers and followers of the new 'all automatic everything M$ does for You''" a good book - George Orwell "1984.

I would even add - it should be "XBOX One US, not You Edition"
-- cause we don't care about the consumer, let's stick him another "Start" button in his youknowwhat.

I really don't like automated uploading personal info to cloud in form of sky drive or anything that's why i don't use it. As far as XBOX goes if you fill your HDD up, XBOX One will remove a title you play at least and install new game, and so on. It will automatically uninstall older game on your console. Caching 50gb install on cloud is impossible, it would take forever to upload and download, again it works if you have your xbox one connected all the time buy oh buy it is going to suck life out of your internet connection.

You don't have to write the game contents out. They'll just be deleted and reloaded from the install server as needed. Both the new consoles have "play as you download" which they say let's you startup a game almost immediately and then have it download content in the background as you play. I guess I'll find out on Friday how well that works.

I guess for me it's not that big of a problem because, there will be no time when I am playing more then two or three games at a time. I tend to stay with a game until I beat it unless it one with online multi-player. So having 6 40gb games on my HD at the same time would be unlikely.

Haha, John has been digging like a ground hog on negative meat for the XB1. Still waiting for the "Hey here is a cool hidden feature that I found on the XB1." NOPE, negative info gets him more hits...lol

I got a particularly good laugh at "proper storage management." What exactly is proper? Automated management is vastly superior, so I guess "proper" means "old stuff I understand".

Automatic like - shutuppa we'll dothatta fo ya ? Don't askka so mannya questionnz ?
We need your datta for tha NSAya ? Would ya share some moar ?

Spicoli said,
I got a particularly good laugh at "proper storage management." What exactly is proper? Automated management is vastly superior, so I guess "proper" means "old stuff I understand".

Good point. Proper storage management is being accomplished, because it works. I presume the system automatically overwrites the largest files from the oldest played games when a new games inserted and insufficient disk space is available. Larger files copy quicker, so reinstall wouldn't be too daunting and likely quite possible seamlessly 'in the background'. I'm presuming they are extracted from their disc/digital package on the HDD, and that parts of the package on disc can be retrieved - maybe not. I can't really see the problem having it utilize all the drive as it wants, aside from trying to play a saved game at your cottage and needing the cloud to access it.

Even if their automated system works flawlessly, why do this? You could argue that some people like a cleaner interface and dont need to see these kind of numbers when they just want to play a game. But some people DO want to see them. Just hide them further into the advanced settings or something similar. Make them available for those that want to look at them. Microsoft is taking a strange position then wont benefit them but could hurt them. Why go for it?

It's because with an automated storage system, the amount of data on the local cache drive doesn't mean what it used to mean. You can run just fine at 100% full but that used to mean the system had a problem you needed to address. A lot of people on here, which are probably more tech savvy than the general public, don't really understand it. Just imagine the support calls and trying to explain how a storage manager works and that 100% full doesn't mean it's full.

Yeah... Like they did receive thousands of calls with the Xbox360 Storage Managment ?
What IF you have a slow connection ? Or an Average of 5 ? 10 Mbit ?
Do you thing downloading even 1/5-th of the 40 GB will be a jiffy ?
Wake up man, or stop smoking that sh#t.
And Yeah... I know how different caching methods work... Cause this is my job -- to work with Databases some smaller, some up to 15-20 TB size.

As has already been said many times, you do not need the entire game to start playing it. If you manage database, you'd also know automatic storage management is pretty common in that context.

Edited by Screw this Nazi Site, Nov 20 2013, 8:59pm :

As I've already said - even 1/5-th of the game content will take AGES to download on a 5mbit connection... or even a 10 mbit which is very common in some countries...
What about async download/upload speeds ? (even MORE common).
Will the console put a big letterboxed sign "please wait with your installation till I make some more room for you" ???
What about non-flat rates for broadband (common in US ? )
Are you even able to answer to HALF of those questions ?
I think not.

Oh ! and since WHEN this is now a 'cache' drive ?
Wait ! I know ! Since M$ told you to tell everyone around you so !

The general consumer should not have to be concerned about storage management - its not the 90s anymore folks.

That sucks. An automatic setting would be nice for people without bandwidth caps. With games being 30-40gb I don't see anyone going all digital on the Xbox one unless they want to sit there for an hour to go back and play an older game. Hopefully they never shut down Xbox Live for the One.

We'll have to see how it actually works in real life, but I would assume you can re-load from the bluray if that's where they game came from. It's not going to copy the game itself to your Skydrive. It will just remove it and then reload from the original source. You won't have to download the entire game to start playing it.

It's fascinating/sad to see how many people that feel comfortable with IT, have such a hard time accepting new concepts. They will almost always go kicking and screaming about anything that doesn't work like the previous system.

Never seen people so stuck in their ways then people in IT. Really really sad

It's not even a new concept. It's just an enterprise concept that Microsoft has pushed down into the consumer space. I administered a multi-tier storage system back in the 90s with (I think) 14TB that cost millions. It worked very much the same as this cloud design except our "cloud" was a tape silo, and it would migrate files to a cache disk transparently when someone accessed them. It made it look to the user like a few GB of disk drives held 14TB of files.

They rely too much on the cloud. No bandwith limitation, Internet everywhere, no problem at all... You just need to redownload that 43Gb game, save file in Skydrive....

Wow, so everybody is on unlimited high-speed Internet now...

That's my issue with this too. Cloud is a great thing, but bandwidth caps really put a crimp on it. I pay $79.99/mth with 100 Gb cap. Will cost me another $30/mth to move up to 150 Gb.

TruckWEB said,
Wow, so everybody is on unlimited high-speed Internet now...

I am.
100Mbit fiber with 0 data cap.
I could upgrade to 200Mbit but I'd lose my IPTV service.

So, I stick with 100Mbit.

John is more than obsessed with the 500gb hard drive and managing space.

Installing every game available and every App available for the next several months will NOT fill the hard drive.

Automatic, means automatic.

The reason games are 'installed' to the HD are for a performance benefit that the OS manages.

If you haven't played a game in a few months and you install a new game, that space will be used by the new game. When you go back to the old game and put the Disc in, it will play instantly as well, and stream the 'install/cache' portion of the game to the HD for performance. At worst, the older game that you are 'reinstalling' might take a few extra seconds to load.

As for game 'saves' and profile information, this is stored locally and on the cloud at the same time. See Windows 8.1 and how SkyDrive works, or even go back to Offline Files from 1999 if this is really that HARD of a concept to grasp.


Here is the concept that is being overlooked...

Technology is supposed to take over work that you would normally have to perform. Every generation of OS technology from Microsoft has filled this role by removing maintenance and basic busy work from the user by allowing the OS to manage needless things automatically.

Worrying about how much space you have 'free' is a waste of time if the OS is going to manage this seamlessly for the user. Stream loading a game install/cache is very easy for an OS to handle in the year 2013 and worrying about how much space it takes up is a waste of the user's time when the game can play without fully 'preloading' the game. (If this was a PS3 where you had to fully pre-load the game before you could play it, then this might be a valid argument.)

When dealing with data/information and removing a hierarchical mindset, it is just a lump of data that is managed. This is what CIS has been doing with database technologies for over 20 years now, where data is stored and size and location are NOT something the end user should ever worry about.

Expand this thinking to an unlimited cloud where a Microsoft DATABASE server and your local console coordinates the management of data, and essentially the local hard drive is only being used to hold the information before it is flushed to the cloud and as a backup, with the rest of the HD being used as an elaborate caching system for the games (aka 'installs'.)


Even with Windows 8.1 and SkyDrive, local storage of user information is only limited by the cloud space available. I have 100gb of data on SkyDrive, yet I can see and search every single one of my 750,000 files on a 32gb Surface. I can even log into a fresh computer and in a couple of minutes have access to my entire 100gb of documents, seamlessly and over a slow 3G connection. My WP8 phone only has 32gb of space, with 20gb used by media, yet I also have access to all 750,000 documents and can search them instantly, in addition to over 20 years of email. Why would a new Xbox One not be this smart as well?

This is the elegance of proper and seamless data management that as a student of CIS 20 years ago we only dreamed of ever seeing it come to fruition.


I know this is important to John, but there is seriously a disconnect in thinking that this would be important to him. Find someone with a background in CIS and understanding of Microsoft roaming/offline data storage concepts from 12 years ago, they can explain why this works, and should work well and why YOU as users should NOT be worrying about free space on your local freaking HD.

Games will take up a lot of storage space..one game will take 43GB of space...that 500GB hard drive will fill up quickly
And what about HD movies, or apps, or music..how will they be managed?
Let's also not forget that Microsoft also said they plan to add external hard drive storage support..if that is planned, that means the 500GB hard drive is indeed finite..and needs a storage management feature

John Callaham said,
Games will take up a lot of storage space..one game will take 43GB of space...that 500GB hard drive will fill up quickly
And what about HD movies, or apps, or music..how will they be managed?
Let's also not forget that Microsoft also said they plan to add external hard drive storage support..if that is planned, that means the 500GB hard drive is indeed finite..and needs a storage management feature

The average install size of release day games is 15GB, with under 30 titles, even the most aggressive gamer is not going to have a problem.

External storage obviously will be nicer for people with large collections as the older 'installs' won't have to fall off the system; however, a few extra seconds of load time is not a major draw back.

Microsoft's media model is based on streaming already. If you really need to have 10TB of movies to play on your Xbox One, throw that storage in a PC and stream it to your Xbox One.

Why would anyone want to have a media drive hanging off their Xbox One or media trapped inside their Xbox One, when it could be accessible to all their devices if it was stored in the cloud or on a PC?

With Xbox Music or Xbox Video, owning content doesn't mean you have to consume local storage space. If you own a movie on Xbox Video, it streams in 1080p on even a 6mbps DSL connection. (Which is lower than our LTE phones now offer.)

If you have music synced to the cloud (which Win8 users should be doing already) all your music is instantly going to stream to your Xbox One. (You can even watch the Music Video versions of the songs you own instead of playing a visualization. -Also works on the XB360)


Consider this, people at Microsoft have already filled their 500GB drives on their Xbox Ones with games and development and downloaded content, and if they hit a wall where the XB1 wasn't smart enough to handle managing the space for them, there would be a manual system already available.


Even with the Xbox 360 and using Online content and 'streaming' instead of local storage the original 20GB units work rather well. I have an original 20Gb unit in this office, with a 32GB USB stick that is used just for holding the downloaded games. Yet I have access to all my music collection, all my video collection on Xbox Video and streaming from my PC (25,000+ songs, 1,000s of movies.) Using the SkyDrive App, I even have access to every picture and video I have taken.

Reading comments above, I was a bit surprised that people still loaded music/media on their console HD. I haven't loaded music on an Xbox since the original. The streaming features available on the XB360 made this practice obsolete in 2005.

Even with a basic DSL connection, the streaming/cloud model will work just fine for users. The Xbox 360 was sold 'requiring' a broadband connection, so this is not something new to gamers or people consuming media on their console.


I do understand the initial 'freak out' moment, but if you breathe a bit and maybe rethink how you deal with your media, you can yet be surprised to find it works better than how you do things now.

The media 'model' Microsoft designed works better than how most people are currently accessing content on their consoles/tablets/phones/PCs, and people should be encouraged to break from manually managing space and manually moving music and movies around, especially when they are redundantly consuming space on every device.

Truly, give it a chance, and give the Microsoft vision of media a chance, it truly makes things so simple and easy.

Spicoli said,
How much space does Netflix take up on the device with tens of thousands of shows?

Yes, because streaming a TV show is the exact same thing as a game. You do realize you're comparing apples and oranges, right?

Mobius Enigma, what are you doing here? How dare you introduce critical thinking into a place where inane shotgun responses are all the norm?

I thought about this too and came to the same conclusion, but clearly, most people don't seem to subscribe to the same critical thinking idea before posting, or just love to whinge without considering anything through just a tad to understand it's probably not a major deal.

From my understanding (And you've backed it up), games are installed as you're playing them, so really, what's the drama here? You have to have the disc in to play anyway, regardless of whether it's installed locally or not, so you're not missing out on anything.

What may be an issue would be if you're talking about cached downloaded vs. disc installed games. For places unlike the US where unlimited internet quotas are just pipe dreams, being able to download tens of gigabytes of data is simply out of the question, so naturally, you wouldn't want to be doing this all the time. I'm willing to give MS the benefit of the doubt and say they've also considered this and their algorithm works by clearing disc cached games first and leaving downloaded titles for as long as possible to minimise this as a potential issue.

Also, 500 GB (Let's say 450 GB to allow for Gb/GB transition and other stuff that may be using it), that's ~11 40 GB games. Now, in a realistic scenario, you're not going to be alternating between those 11 games constantly, you'll be playing a few for a long run, then change, so in all probability, the first batch of games are probably unnecessarily consuming storage space anyway.

Top posts BTW.

Edited by Ideas Man, Nov 20 2013, 10:28pm :

How do offline saves work then? What if I want to delete a DLC to make enough room for a game instead of deleting an entire game?

It's baffling that the Xbox team thought this was a good idea.

You're thinking old school. With automatic storage management you don't have to delete anything. It all appears to be installed but it may or may not be cached on the local disk. Usually these kind of systems use a least recently accessed algorithm so the game you haven't played for months may not be stored locally. When you go to access something that's been migrated, it pulls it back into cache.

To compensate for the lack of swapping internal hard drives, they give you the "feature" to never know how much space you're using so you just think there's always room on it. /s

Internet based storage management for things like save games and settings that take up very little space..the big storage footprints for games, apps, movies and music will all be stored on the hard drive

Spicoli said,
That's what you got out of it? Skipped the whole part about the Internet based storage management?

I read it. It still doesn't show you how much space you're using on the hard drive. Soooo, what's your point again?

Tha Bloo Monkee said,

I read it. It still doesn't show you how much space you're using on the hard drive. Soooo, what's your point again?

That's because it doesn't matter as it's stored on the Internet.

Internet =/ local hard drive. Unless you have some sort of crazy future internet or something that can instantly beam a game to your hard drive, you're going to be waiting some time to play a game as it downloads. And many games are +20gb.

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
Internet =/ local hard drive. Unless you have some sort of crazy future internet or something that can instantly beam a game to your hard drive, you're going to be waiting some time to play a game as it downloads. And many games are +20gb.

You don't have to wait for the entire game to download. Files are fetched and cached as needed.

Spicoli said,

You don't have to wait for the entire game to download. Files are fetched and cached as needed.


Unless you have some sort of crazy future internet or something that can instantly beam a game to your hard drive, you're going to be waiting some time to play a game as it downloads

I guess you didn't read this line?
Even if that is the case, it still has to download some of the game. Sooo, what's your point again?

Tha Bloo Monkee said,

I guess you didn't read this line?
Even if that is the case, it still has to download some of the game. Sooo, what's your point again?

You seem to be arguing for the sake of arguing. Have you used streaming media? Do you know what a cache is?

Spicoli said,

You seem to be arguing for the sake of arguing. Have you used streaming media? Do you know what a cache is?


No.
Yes.
Yes.

What's your point?

Edited by Tha Bloo Monkee, Nov 20 2013, 6:22pm :

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
And many games are +20gb.

most of the games are > 20GB.
If you live in an area where you can't get at least 30Gb service, an online console should not be considered.

i'm still curious on what filesystem that xbone will use?
NTFS, ExFat, ReFS, or another undocumented proprietary filesystem?

i guess the idea of 'automatic' is to prevent the HDD selective copying, using non-xbox equipment such as Linux PC.

Torolol said,
i'm still curious on what filesystem that xbone will use?
NTFS, ExFat, ReFS, or another undocumented proprietary filesystem?

i guess the idea of 'automatic' is to prevent the HDD selective copying, using non-xbox equipment such as Linux PC.

It is NTFS although it may use ReFS on top. This is why you won't have 'please turn off console properly' and 'repairing HD' messages like I have already seen on the PS4.

NTFS is a better FS than the anti-Microsoft crowd would like for people to believe. Proprietary or not, it is STILL the holy grail of FS technologies that the OSS world and competitors like Apple would like to someday achieve.

Mobius Enigma said,

It is NTFS although it may use ReFS on top.

Neg.
If it's ReFS it's ReFS. there is no on top.

The On-Top is NTFS API for legacy interaction with ReFS.

I would have personally liked a memory management feature... is it too much to ask for the ability to back my own saves up to a USB device?

We've had games this gen with bugs which have erased / corrupted save games, this has happened to me with Crackdown, Gears of War and Gears of War 2.

As the console will work offline it would be nice to take your profile / saves around to a friends house on a USB device and be able to play without been online for what ever reason. We've had Xbox Lan's before where the internet has been down, or unreliable.

I love the idea of everything syncing to the cloud, however i still wish to have some control over my data.

InsaneNutter said,
I would have personally liked a memory management feature... is it too much to ask for the ability to back my own saves up to a USB device?

We've had games this gen with bugs which have erased / corrupted save games, this has happened to me with Crackdown, Gears of War and Gears of War 2.

As the console will work offline it would be nice to take your profile / saves around to a friends house on a USB device and be able to play without been online for what ever reason. We've had Xbox Lan's before where the internet has been down, or unreliable.

I love the idea of everything syncing to the cloud, however i still wish to have some control over my data.

In theory what you say sounds reasonable, but honestly, how often have you been anywhere that you or your friends have not had some form of Internet available. Even if is just your cell phone hotspot, that is all you need to login and get your game saves.

Even 5 years ago, I would have agreed with you completely, but not today when every cell phone has internet and most people that would be buying an Xbox One can afford a cell phone.

Even my freaking car has LTE and is a hotspot that can broadcast 1/4 of a mile when I park it next to a beach, let alone my freaking phone in my pocket that I could also use.

Anyone spending $500 on a game console won't be worrying about finding internet. Seriously.

This probably comes down to it being designed as an "always on" console, where storage was really just a 500gb local cache. Now that it's an "offline" device, I'm sure they'll add in storage management in a future update.

Of course, sony fanboys flame away, and Microsoft fanboys feel free to explain how "storage management" is unnecessary

Spicoli said,
I don't think so. It's never going to be a good offline device as it's designed from the ground up to be an Internet device.

There is truth in what you say. However, what computing technology or device have you seen in the last 5 years that hasn't depended on the Internet?

Mobius Enigma said,

There is truth in what you say. However, what computing technology or device have you seen in the last 5 years that hasn't depended on the Internet?

Kinect

As long as they get that feature rolled out in the near future I don't see a problem with it not being available at launch. Now, if it doesn't show up ever that's a huge problem. Long term they need storage management and a reasonable way to add more space.

Spicoli said,
What feature? The new feature is the automated storage management which will be in place day 1.
They did not describe what that was outside of saving settings/saved games in the cloud. Obviously, as this article is referring, they are talking about managing free space, adding disk space etc. Those things the article specifically says will not be available at launch which would cause me to address them.


games and apps can be uninstalled or reinstalled instantly

I'd -really- like to see someone reinstall a 43gb game "instantly"... Especially if they haven't got 43gb of space...

You use a virtual memory paging algorithm. You can be fetching the parts of the game you need as you're playing it. Being on-line opens up all kinds of possibilities to extend capabilities beyond the local hardware.

The problem is that's not a simple answer to that question when you're using virtual storage. The local disk is really just a cache and probably nothing is ever deleted until the space is needed for something else.

Spicoli said,
You use a virtual memory paging algorithm. You can be fetching the parts of the game you need as you're playing it. Being on-line opens up all kinds of possibilities to extend capabilities beyond the local hardware.

Assuming that your internet connection is up to the task, and that other members of your family aren't robbing all the bandwidth.............

20legend said,

Assuming that your internet connection is up to the task, and that other members of your family aren't robbing all the bandwidth.............

Same as using a Roku or any other Internet device.

FloatingFatMan said,

I'd -really- like to see someone reinstall a 43gb game "instantly"... Especially if they haven't got 43gb of space...

In regards to the PS4, the games starts to install, and once it reaches a certain point you can start playing, and it continues to install and download updates in the background.

I like the whole 'automatic' concept, but using that as an excuse for not showing how much space you simply have left is ridiculous.

Have multiple metrics. Just like Windows shows Memory allocation, have a Total, Cached (temporary/reusable), available (in use as cache, but open for use), and free (not in use at all).

exotoxic said,
Over simplification so it appeals to as many average people as possible.

True but they still could have hidden away the option to control the space yourself for the advanced users. It would be out-of-sight for the average player.

Lord Method Man said,
What happened to Microsoft? This response is right out of the Apple handbook.

... and why are you assuming this is a bad thing?

Not having to worry about storage space most of the time is a nice thing

Except that we always worry about it saying that it is "automatic" doesn't cut it when you try to install a game and there's no way to know directly if you have the space to install it

I agree, we need to see how much space is left. bury it in the system settings, out of reach of the 'average' consumer who doesn't care, but let us other, more advanced users see how much is left. I don't like things that decide what gets taken off when. If I'm going somewhere that doesn't have internet, like a vacation house, I want to be able to plan my downloaded games properly.

Okay, then define what "how much space is left" means in a cache. You usually run your cache 100% full all the time and replace things as demand requires. Initially you won't have much stuff but approaching 100% is meaningless as it's a cache and not the total of your storage.

John Callaham said,
Except that we always worry about it saying that it is "automatic" doesn't cut it when you try to install a game and there's no way to know directly if you have the space to install it

That is making the assumption that it doesn't tell you when there isn't... Which I have found nothing that supports this.

Just because it doesn't tell you the free space doesn't mean it doesn't know...

I want to be able to control it. Sure, cache is always maxed out, otherwise it's kinda pointless. But I don't want it to cache my games. automatically When Halo comes out, I want it on my box at all times regardless of the last time I played it. I should have that kind of control on something made from Microsoft. I then want to plan my other games.

Spicoli said,
Automatic storage management is a new feature even though whoever wrote this doesn't seem to have the computing background to understand what it is.

If that's the case, why advertise the local storage capacity on the box?

Aergan said,

If that's the case, why advertise the local storage capacity on the box?

Has there been any advertising that mention it? It's in the specs of course which web sites mention in their articles about it.

I was under the belief that the xboxone directly in this case was supposed to be the all around entertainment experience?

need to know how much drive space you have if you plan to play your music through it... drive space utility is a must!

You won't because music files will be shifted back and forth with the skydrive storage as needed. I assume they'll choose migration based on when you last accessed it. This is old hat for us that have used HSM systems.

Lol their response is as useful as ever. The features like retrieving saved games info from the cloud is a good idea but the lack of any type of storage management is a major oversight.

Their response reminds me of something Apple would say, being that it's along the lines of, "It juth workth, ithn't that amazthing?!" /lisp

Ah...so it is like Xbox 1, or the original Xbox. It too, didn't tell you how much hard drive space was left. The only indicator it had, was when you were on your 'last' 50,000 Blocks of memory!

Man, I hate how unfinished both of these systems are at launch. 6-7 Years length of the last gen, you think they would have had enough time designing this new one to be perfect. But, alas, both are being rushed out unfinished.

greensabath said,

Man, I hate how unfinished both of these systems are at launch. 6-7 Years length of the last gen, you think they would have had enough time designing this new one to be perfect. But, alas, both are being rushed out unfinished.

Yep. Im not bothering with either in their current state.

John Callaham said,
I had forgotten that the Xbox didn't have a way to view how much hard drive space was left.of course back then 20 GB was huge

The original was 8GB (some had 10GB but formatted to 8GB), I cannot remember if the first iteration of the 360 Dashboard let you manage the storage, been so long ago, but I seem to remember it did.

John Callaham said,
I had forgotten that the Xbox didn't have a way to view how much hard drive space was left.of course back then 20 GB was huge

The original Xbox had 8, 360 had 20 (which wasnt enough - still annoyed that their teased 40 in their viral campaign).

I think the biggest issue, was at that time, 300GB Drives were commonplace. They were selling 20GB & 40GB drives for the same price.

This time, they are including 500GB drive, but 2TB and 3TB drives are commonplace. Considering that EVERY Game is gonna be ripped to the HDD, 500GB is gonna be filled up fast.

TsarNikky said,
"Unfinished" seems to be the new operative word at Microsoft for the past two years...Windows-8, Surface, XBox, what's next?

You forgot Windows Phone

Yeah.. Now that I think about it. I don't think I have ever checked how much space is left on my XBox 360 drive. I just play my XBox and forget about such details. Which is why I bought an Xbox in the first place, to be able to play games without having to manage it like a PC. Maybe Microsoft noticed this practice among users.