Yahoo Aquires Maven Networks

Slumping financials and threats of takeovers haven't deterred search-engine Yahoo from conducting business as usual. In a press release today, the company announced it had aquired Maven Networks, an online video platform provider, to expand state-of-the-art consumer video and advertising experiences on its website network of leading premium video publishers across the web. The easy-to-use Maven video publishing platform enables publishers to deliver state-of-the-art consumer video experiences through simple media management, workflow and flexible media players. Maven also enables publishers to increase video ad inventory and revenue through a dynamic advertising insertion engine, sophisticated inventory management, reporting tools and advanced ad formats. The purchase has set Yahoo back a cool $160 million.

"Video is projected to be the fastest growing segment of the online ad market, and Maven will significantly help advance Yahoo!'s strategy, expanding the video opportunity for publishers and increasing the efficiency and effectiveness for advertisers. This is a big win for publishers, advertisers, consumers and for Yahoo!," said Hilary Schneider, EVP, Global Partner Solutions at Yahoo.

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11 Comments

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yahoo doesnt want to sell, its up to the shareholders. If Microsoft offers them enough money then it may entice the shareholders to take the bait. Yahoo is increasing its real estate to make it harder for Microsoft to buy.

(Volatile said @ #5)
yahoo doesnt want to sell, its up to the shareholders. If Microsoft offers them enough money then it may entice the shareholders to take the bait. Yahoo is increasing its real estate to make it harder for Microsoft to buy.

Uh, no that's wrong. You need to look at the current share pricing. That is what Yahoo is stated their basis for deflecting M$ with that reasoning. This has nothing to do with "increasing .. real estate to make it harder for M$ to buy".

I can hopefully explain this in Layman's Terms

Microsoft offered YAHOO a figure lower than the organization was worth, therefore "YAHOO basically said "on you're bike and told them they would not except their offer..."

By using the capital and assets of the organization, YAHOO can increase the value of the organisation, therefore, Microsoft would have to increase their offer to coninside with the changes within the organization.

Does this make better sense.

What is Yahoo up to? Would purchasing Yahoo also purchase Maven? Why buy a video network when your own company's about to be sold? Perhaps I'm missing something, but if there's some strategy in this, I don't see it besides for either attracting more attention or an attempt to raise their own value.

That deal may have already been in the works before Microsoft announced the bid for Yahoo. And there's nothing official that Microsoft will be able to purchase Yahoo, it is up to the shareholders now and they may vote against the deal.

(Mythex said @ #1)
What is Yahoo up to? Would purchasing Yahoo also purchase Maven? Why buy a video network when your own company's about to be sold? Perhaps I'm missing something, but if there's some strategy in this, I don't see it besides for either attracting more attention or an attempt to raise their own value.

1) Yahoo wasn't about to sell. Microsoft approached them with an unsolicited bid. Do you know what that word means? If not, stay the hell in school until you do.

2) Just because Microsoft wants to buy Yahoo, that doesn't mean Yahoo is interested in sell (despite speculation by the armchair jockeys around here) -- as made abundantly clear by their continued rejections -- and it certainly doesn't mean Yahoo should stop functioning as a company. If it did, I'll go put up a bid to buy Microsoft for $0.01 just so I can stop them from doing any business.

(A Clockwork Lime said @ #1.2)
1) Yahoo wasn't about to sell. Microsoft approached them with an unsolicited bid. Do you know what that word means? If not, stay the hell in school until you do.

Can you explain this point a little more?.

On big corporation level, almost any bid is a unsolicited one, with the exception of financial trouble/near or in bankrupt.


(A Clockwork Lime said @ #1.2)

1) Yahoo wasn't about to sell. Microsoft approached them with an unsolicited bid. Do you know what that word means? If not, stay the hell in school until you do.

2) Just because Microsoft wants to buy Yahoo, that doesn't mean Yahoo is interested in sell (despite speculation by the armchair jockeys around here) -- as made abundantly clear by their continued rejections -- and it certainly doesn't mean Yahoo should stop functioning as a company. If it did, I'll go put up a bid to buy Microsoft for $0.01 just so I can stop them from doing any business.

Wow, you're such a smart guy. By the way, I already graduated from school. That was a while back. I'm just a computer guy, not into this economical stuff here.

Ok, bidding Microsoft for 1 cent does not apply for this situation. What you're saying could not happen, and is a completely different story. This is billions of dollars, and there IS an amount of money that Yahoo will have to break to if they like it or not because their shareholders can add a very large influence to their decision. With all these frequent attempts at a takeover by Microsoft and offers from other well-known companies, it is inevitable that Yahoo can't reject forever.