Editorial

Your battery life sucks, and why it's your own fault

My company recently started using the Blackberry Torch as their standard mobile device. My views on this decision notwithstanding, the users seem to be happy with their shiny new touchscreen toys, and that’s really what my job is all about: keeping the users happy. One user, however, wasn’t so happy. She came storming in to my office (cubicle) with a dead device in hand.

“I got this phone earlier this week, and it’s already broken! I want a new one!”

“Have you tried plugging it in with the power adapter?”

“Yes, the power adapter works fine. I charged it Tuesday night.”

“It’s Friday…”

“Yes, and?”

“These phones really aren’t meant to hold a charge for longer than 24 hours, and that’s if you’re barely using it. You should try to get into the habit of charging your phone every night while you sleep, and you shouldn’t have a problem. “

The user was incredulous. “You mean it only lasts for a day? That’s ridiculous! My last phone went 2-3 days without needing a charge! I thought this was supposed to be an upgrade!”

Welcome to my world.

As I related this exchange to my coworkers and shared a laugh over the incessant naiveté of my company’s user base, I realized that my user had a point. When you think about it from her perspective (a very non-technical perspective), why in the world should battery life be decreasing as phone specifications increase? Any technical person knows the obvious answer – that increased computing power and screen size will drain battery power faster – but there is a core issue here that companies desperately need to address. On a mobile device, that is meant to be used for extended periods of time off of a power source, how can you get away with releasing a phone that barely makes it through the workday? Larry Page didn’t seem to think this was a problem, and publicly maintained that an Android phone should last a day on a charge. You can make all the excuses in the world, but the fact still remains that a movie has been released to theaters based on the fact that you could die because smartphone battery life sucks.

We have only ourselves to blame. We had no business allowing phone manufacturers and OS developers to dictate what our standards were for battery life. We are the consumer, and the consumer is always right. We valued power over function and opted to live with decreasing battery life until the situation slowly but steadily degraded into the dystopian battery life future that we live in today. Today, I keep my phone plugged in via USB at work, I have a car charger in each of my cars, and I keep multiple power adapters at home. I made that decision when I ordered my HTC EVO 4G a year ago, and while I love the power that the handset brings to the table, I have always considered the battery life to be unacceptable.

So, what happened? Why are companies dragging their feet when it comes to battery life? More importantly, is it the companies that are at fault for not scaling their batteries with their hardware, or is it developers using scarce battery life irresponsibly? According to Kevin Burden, mobile device research director at ABI Research,

“There are ways of improving cell phone battery life, but there are very few ways of improving the batteries themselves. Essentially, battery technology is governed by God — there are just no new elements showing up in the Periodic Table.”

Some may call that a copout, but it raises a good point: Battery technology is somewhat limited by natural restrictions. Fancy engineering work is required to get around the natural hurdles posed by available elements, and it’s a lot simpler to work on software innovations that work with the limits imposed by nature. While the technology that allows for fluid touchscreen UIs and dual-core mobile processors marches ever forward, it does so in spite of the lagging battery industry. Improving the actual battery would require a leap of innovation that doesn’t happen very often. Even then, that technology would have to be adapted to a cheap, mass-production environment that won’t cause the price of phones to fluctuate wildly. These are all factors that can, for the time being, be ignored if developers can make their applications power-efficient. This seems to be the most economical solution for now, but lithium-ion batteries are only improving incrementally, and a radical shift in electricity storage medium technology will eventually be required to put battery life back at a reasonable level.

However the industry decides to ameliorate the issue, there is one thing that absolutely needs to stop happening. I hear a lot of talk about decreasing CPU power, and generally taking out features to save battery life. There are plenty of ways that developers and manufacturers can extend battery life right now, without having to sacrifice feature quality. AMOLED screens have helped lower the battery footprint of displays, and software developers have a multitude of tools available to make their OS and applications more efficient at no substantial cost to the end user. Consumers need to reassess what they believe a decent battery life is, and demand that the manufacturers and developers improve the status quo.

How would you define a reasonable lifetime of a cell phone battery? Was my user correct in assuming that 2-3 days is acceptable, or is a day really all that’s necessary for the majority of smartphone users? The truth is, it really depends on the needs and function of each consumer and phone. If battery technology still stays stagnant as the rest of the phone gets more powerful, one possible scenario is that we will start to see a marked fragmentation in the current lineup of phones. As users start to realize that they will need more than 8 hours of battery life to get through a day, manufacturers will respond by introducing phones that are light on heavy application processing and focus more on mobile connectivity and ease of use. The model that RIM is slowly abandoning – the pure productivity phone—will return as manufacturers struggle to find ways to keep up battery life on phones that have become miniature computers. It’s definitely not the ideal outcome, and it still leaves those looking for power in their phones short on battery life, but unless a major breakthrough in battery tech happens soon, or developers learn to better harness scarce resources, it seems inevitable. And we let it happen.

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we probably already do we just won't ever get our hands on it until they've exhausted every other means of dollar making out of us first

The simple truth is that batteries don't adhere to Moore's Law. Enough said. If they did, we'd have button-cell batteries that could power your entire house for a year by now.

My cheap a** Motorola what ever it is for Boost will easily last 5 days being used all the time. I don't use it at home much, so, thusly, it's turned off, but then I can get it to go for 7-10 days minimum.

The part that most people don't get is you DON'T charge them back up when there is still battery power left. You let the battery TOTALLY die before charging. That goes for ANY rechargeable battery.

Why doesn't that sink in with most people?

cork1958 said,
My cheap a** Motorola what ever it is for Boost will easily last 5 days being used all the time. I don't use it at home much, so, thusly, it's turned off, but then I can get it to go for 7-10 days minimum.

The part that most people don't get is you DON'T charge them back up when there is still battery power left. You let the battery TOTALLY die before charging. That goes for ANY rechargeable battery.

Why doesn't that sink in with most people?

No, that's actually not true with modern batteries and it is not recommended to drain them completely.

cork1958 said,
My cheap a** Motorola what ever it is for Boost will easily last 5 days being used all the time. I don't use it at home much, so, thusly, it's turned off, but then I can get it to go for 7-10 days minimum.

The part that most people don't get is you DON'T charge them back up when there is still battery power left. You let the battery TOTALLY die before charging. That goes for ANY rechargeable battery.

Why doesn't that sink in with most people?

That used to be the case when Cell phones use NImh or NIcad batteries as they'd gain a memory and would only charge part way that is no longer the case with lithium ion batteries used in todays Ph in-fact it's not recommended to drain you Li-ion battery at all

My Bold 9700 (albeit with beta OS 6) lasts for about 2 days of heavy usage. My Iphone 3G manages the same battery life by being virtually unused during the day.

If I really try, I can get my Droid2 battery down around 15% in a full day. That means taking it off charge at 7:30am when I leave the house, and plugging it in around 11:40 or so when I go to bed. Average use for me is ~40 minutes of voice call per day, maybe half a dozen facebook checks and/or foursquare sillyness, 3-5 soundhound sessions, several pictures and dozens of text messages... and of course a few instances of looking at my phone just for the sake of looking at it.

I'm around Wi-Fi probably 80% of the time (at home and at work/university) so that saves some power (vs. using the 3G radio). I bought a docking station for my Droid to sit in at home when it's charging - it's really cool, functions as an alarm clock too.

This is exactly what I think. Today's smartphones shouldn't be called phones. They are computers with the calling option. I'd neved call a device that lasts merely a day a phone. This situation resembles me the digital camera megapixel war - manufacturers put faster and faster CPUs in the phone, even dual core, to show off. What for? Is this a phone or a gaming console? What if I'd like a decent touchscreen smartphone, I don't want to play games on it, and want it to last 3 days on a single charge/2 hours of talks daily?
What the author describes in the article is the main reason for me to stay away from these so-called-phones and stick with my Nokia E72.

ipod touch 3rd gen dies down in 40min of playing 3D games (i charge it on 20% and only unplug it when 100%) so i take good care but still...

I charge my iPhone twice a day and I got used to it, mainly because I use the phone nonstop and I won't compromise on turning off push notification, or 3G, or tuning down the brightness level.

My Nexus S seems to have reasonably good battery.
It last a good 20 hours of moderate (emails, 1 or 2 phone calls, constant txt messaging) usage before the batter is nearly fully drained.
A huge improvement over my htc hero and the iphone 3g I had before that.

I think a lot of it comes down to the software you are using as well - I got similar battery life with some of the later 2.2 roms for my hero.

FWIW, the biggest culprit when it comes to battery drain is still displays on modern smartphones. While battery tech may be stagnant, display tech is a pretty active industry, and if that can become more efficient, we'll see massive improvements simply enough.

People traded features for battery life. News at 11.
At any time did your IT department bring this downside to the table when discussing smartphone deployment/selection/cost? My experience is usually that IT gets blinded to new features over common sense 'naive' user needs.

Were users provided additional power chargers and spare USB cables and educated on their use? Or just plop, here ya go, but check out your (bloated) contact list!

What people don't realize about BBs and GMail is that if you do not log off of GMail, it will drain your battery in under a day. If you are a company and you want to curb these complaints, lock the phone down and prevent all of the excessive apps plus educate the users on how to prevent their batteries from draining.

Your experience is exactly the reason why I went back to using a traditional non-smart phone and choosing to carry around a laptop in my bag - I mean, I'm going to carry the bag around I might as well through in a laptop and a 3G USB device as a cherry on top.

End users also need to realise this: The more features, the bigger the screen, the more complex the input capabilities the more battery power it'll suck - life sucks but it is time to realise that something is gotta give between battery life and features.

Until the flux capacitor is invented...it's not going to change. Maybe with some new flexible battery, that can take the shape of the entire device, so they can devote more space inside the device for battery power, or people live with the idea of a BIGGER device, don't look for it to change.

I can get 2-3 days on my iphone pretty easily, granted I'm not using 3G most of the time. I actually bought my Macbook solely for the battery time, it can last me a whole "day" (7-10 hours, though flash will kill it super fast). That said, batteries are archaic and I'm all for this new super battery to swoop in a let usage times stop being the main reason to buy or not buy something.

I'm pretty sure I can make it 2 days with my Focus, without charging it, but my 4 year old sony ericsson phone with a 4 year old battery on its last legs, also would last about 2 days...

Oh how technology has improved
/s

Battery life is subjective and purely dependent on how you use the device. My current laptop will get 3 hours max on battery. That's double my last laptop but it's still not as long as I'd like. Then again I'm asking alot with it's quad core processor and dedicated graphics adapter.

My Samsung Captivate will last about 2 days on a single charge but that's with minimal use. It's less than a day with normal use but I'm usually able to charge before I get home. I keep my ac charger on hand and a car charger in the vehicle.

I can go 2 full days on my iPhone 4... but I have to stick it on the charger mid-morning on the 3rd day.

Still... I charge it just about every night. As much as it pains me to stick it on the charger when only 25% drained, it would be worse for me to be out somewhere and have it run out of juice when I needed it most.

Shadrack said,
I can go 2 full days on my iPhone 4... but I have to stick it on the charger mid-morning on the 3rd day.

Still... I charge it just about every night. As much as it pains me to stick it on the charger when only 25% drained, it would be worse for me to be out somewhere and have it run out of juice when I needed it most.

Should'nt "pain you" at all, iphone dont have the older types of batterys and prefer not to have a Regular Charging Cycle, they even recomend you to "boost charge" as it were. So charging it from 25% doesnt harm and doesnt get a memory.
They also mention that you should'nt drain the battery to 0% and do a FULL charger, maybe once a month ...

my sony ericsson k790a phone has no problem holding a charge for 2-3 days, and this is after 4 years of abuse. i've always been quite proud of it very quality phone. not the best in the world now, but still gets the job done. most phones still don't have its 3.2mp camera + flash!

I agree and disagree to certain extents.
Yes, you are correct to say that with increased power comes decreased battery life. But battery life is just one of those things by manufacturer's design not meant to last. The scenario with both my HP laptop and my Samsung phone is the same: the battery life after full charge drastically decreases after 1 year of use. Call them up and ask them why it doesn't hold its charge--the answer I got is that "Oh this battery has typically a lifespan of 1 year. Its made like that"

This is simply a scenario of planned obsolesence, where things are specifically designed to suck and not last long (kinda like HP printer cartridges). Here is the documentary that should explain it much better than I can: http://vimeo.com/17750184

“There are ways of improving cell phone battery life, but there are very few ways of improving the batteries themselves. Essentially, battery technology is governed by God."

No it is not governed by the thing you call god, god is factually impossible. On a side note I have a Samsung feature phone and it last more than a week with good use. I couldn't really imagine charging my phone every night.

I was thinking this exact thing the other day, why are we still stuck using this old technology. We are being pushed with new technologies except we're gonna hit a brick wall when sooner or later the technology itself will have to get more effiencent or they will have to find a different type of battery.

I'm genuinely in 2 minds. Get another smart-phone, e.g. iPhone 4 OR get a basic Nokia with a basic screen. 1 day battery life or weeks battery life (for someone that uses their phone alot with calls and texts and on the move).

Froyo definitely proves that software tweaks can significantly increase battery life. How much beter could battery life be if the fast processor just plain shut off when the phone is idle and a much slower, cheaper processor picked up the slack just to make sure it doesn't miss a call or text message.

PS. Avoid games and anything with 3d in it if you aren't going to be near a charging socket in the next hour or three. Oy, but 3d hardware is brutal on the battery.

I think every handset should come with basic instructions to warn costumers of battery-draining features that can be disabled by software and the benefits and drawbacks involved.
A simple paper sheet could do that pretty easily.

I was disappointed when I moved from a basic Nokia to a smartphone. I can get two days only out of it instead of about a week before.

But then, I sat and thought about it. Not so long ago a battery wouldn't be able to power something with that much computing power at all - it would be in a huge box plugged in at the wall.

Go back a bit further and that smartphone in your pocket has (a lot) more computing power than a room full of computer would be able to give you.

It would be nice to see battery technology catch up though, and not just for smartphones but other uses like electric vehicles.

I'm curious, and this could just be me being uber silly but...why do cell phones not just have the ability recharge themselves using the sun? It seems rather stupid to waste the massive battery/battery charger up in the sky! Battery technology may be at a standstill, but finding new and innovative ways to charge your battery is hardly stagnant.

nekkidtruth said,
I'm curious, and this could just be me being uber silly but...why do cell phones not just have the ability recharge themselves using the sun? It seems rather stupid to waste the massive battery/battery charger up in the sky! Battery technology may be at a standstill, but finding new and innovative ways to charge your battery is hardly stagnant.

Would be nice long as it doesn't make the phone overally much larger, some phones do have the space on them where you could stick the solar cells at. My Casio watch recharges from light and has an advertised 10 year life on the battery because of this. That and having atomic time kept on it as well is just awesome.

Martog said,

Would be nice long as it doesn't make the phone overally much larger, some phones do have the space on them where you could stick the solar cells at. My Casio watch recharges from light and has an advertised 10 year life on the battery because of this. That and having atomic time kept on it as well is just awesome.

Cool about the watch As for the size of the cell phone, I'm sure you've seen the size of many of the phones out there today. We've moved away from demanding the smallest possible phone when we switched gears to demanding smartphones That being said, there are calculators that are just as small and even smaller than most phones today that are solar. The option/possibility is there, I just don't understand why we're not utilizing it.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2...10/08/nuclear_coin_battery/

One of serveral articles ive seen over the years talking about isotope power.
The isotope gives off steady energy as it decays, so say it gave off 1.5v it would give you that for aslong as the isotope is active (some reports say 30 years some even thousands of years).


If i had enough of these i could power my house non stop till im dead no more cold winters or electric bills


On a side note thats probably why its not taken off yet, electric companys dont like being made obsolete.

Louisifer said,
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2...10/08/nuclear_coin_battery/

One of serveral articles ive seen over the years talking about isotope power.
The isotope gives off steady energy as it decays, so say it gave off 1.5v it would give you that for aslong as the isotope is active (some reports say 30 years some even thousands of years).


If i had enough of these i could power my house non stop till im dead no more cold winters or electric bills


On a side note thats probably why its not taken off yet, electric companys dont like being made obsolete.

I like the idea of batteries lasting 10+ years....but this could also lead to toxic batteries in the land fill that degrade more slowly than current ones today. Both should never be in the landfill but some countries don't have strict oversight...

I had the 1600mAh extended battery for my old G1, and that gave me about 2.5 days of steady data use, at the expense of making the device about as thick as a bar of soap. It seemed like a fair tradeoff to me.

Now I'm just waiting on a nice, thick, extended battery for my new G2. =P

When I got my iPhone 3GS my battery lasted 3 to 4 days with lite cell phone calls, surfing google maps and getting other reference info whistle I was traveling. I thought it was great, and my co-works thought my battery was magic because they had a different experience with their iPhones... I did not go app crazy. I just used the most practicle and usefule features. However, no 12 months of having the thing does my battery nearly stay charged for a day. I make it home with 10% left just in time to tether it to its power chain. Moreover, while I'm home... unless I receive a call and I need to move around it stays enthrawled on that power chain until I leave in the moring for work.

Sure, manufacturers and developers can do more to save battery life. It would be a good idea to have trancparency for consumers where both developers and manufactures can say they followed a list of standard best practices that we all can agree or will allow consumers the option to save battery life. Shutting the phone off just is not practicle anymore since they take so darn long to boot. Basic Phone and Texting capabilities should at least load before any other feature including the main OS... Have those available as instant on, and they when the OS boots then you can switch over to the richer experiences.

One problem is the manufacturers are going for more quantity not quality. Parts are poorly strung together with terrible manufacturing. But its how we meet the needs of the mass. The life of a smart phone is shrinking. I mean once you buy a computer new, its already out of date. With smart phones it seems like once the idea is conceived it's already out of date. The industry is slowly closing in on itself. But what do I know; all I like is my phone to call and text, simple.

Most people are helpless, especially with new technologies and expect many of these devices to work however they want them to work. Not understanding boundaries or limitations on something simple as battery life. Of course if you use the device throughout the day (emailing, texting etc) the battery will die. Duh.

But hey, without these users some of us wouldnt have a job.......

A lot of the problem is the complete BS runtimes these companies advertise. They say 'average use' but that is always a load of crap.

If they specify a X amount of hours on a battery I subtract 2 hours to get a more realistic usage. My brand new laptop is advertised at 5 hours I get more like 3.

necrosis said,
A lot of the problem is the complete BS runtimes these companies advertise. They say 'average use' but that is always a load of crap.

If they specify a X amount of hours on a battery I subtract 2 hours to get a more realistic usage. My brand new laptop is advertised at 5 hours I get more like 3.


necrosis said,
A lot of the problem is the complete BS runtimes these companies advertise. They say 'average use' but that is always a load of crap.

If they specify a X amount of hours on a battery I subtract 2 hours to get a more realistic usage. My brand new laptop is advertised at 5 hours I get more like 3.

LG advertised my Bat life as being 440hr standby that's 18.3 days pffft it's more like 5 days if im frigging lucky and that's with only light use and all the power save functions turned on too I'd love to meet the guy who tested it I'd test how far up his ring i could shove it

My BlackBerry Bold 9700 lasts 3 days on a single charge, and that's 3 days of using email, bbm, sms, and making calls

The only change that probably helps this, is i have my phone backlight on low.

WarioTBH said,
My BlackBerry Bold 9700 lasts 3 days on a single charge, and that's 3 days of using email, bbm, sms, and making calls

The only change that probably helps this, is i have my phone backlight on low.

This this batery problem is more known for touchscreen phones.. My Bold 9000 lasts me 3-4 days between charges and I use over 1000 minutes a month easily and never have to watch my battery usage...

Good read.

I get 48 hours of use from my BlackBerry Curve 9300 and thats more than good enough for me. Granted; I'm not a phone 'power user' as such. I use it for calls SMS and twitter mostly.

Here, here! I would say that new phones now have to handle larger screens and more power-hungry connections than previous iterations, but still - <1day is poor.

My 2nd hand HTC Desire lasted ~1.5days with the stock rom/firmware. Having flashed a custom rom it now takes a beating and is still going after 3 days. Software can be a drain, too: bad apps, poor firmware. But the screen/data/poor reception are the main drains.

my one basic samsung phone runs for a couple weeks idle... samsung smart phone lasts about a day idle.. two big differences, larger screen, and a lot more code running when it is idle to keep that much larger OS running..

Yes but what's the point of building a battery that will last longer and need less recharges, how are they going to keep doing more money, until recently you didn't get firmware updates for your phones, you were stuck with that until you had to buy a new one.
Same with oil and electric cars, it's not a matter of why are we still burning oil with a 30% efficiency motor, when we could be driving maglev or garbage powered vehicles, the answer is simple: cause it generates more money for companies the way it is, the other options are too risky for them...like I always say their objective is to make as much money as they can with minimum investment, not to make us happy. (BTW I'm not a commy or a tree-hugger)

Buy a phone with removable battery. I can go a week without charging my G1 because I bought a bunch of batteries on ebay for like $2 each with two external chargers. Running with BS OFF I can get a good 12 hours every day out of one, the others are backups. Imagine running wifi tether without being plugged in, at 2PM, and not giving a crap that your phone battery is about to run out cos you can pop a new one in 20 seconds.

My LG Optimus 7 has an alright battery life but it drains itself at odd times. For example last night I forgot to leave it on charge and lost a third of its battery life just doing nothing for 8 hours. Yet there are sometimes when it goes through a whole 12 hour day with being fine.

I just want infinite battery

Ently said,
My LG Optimus 7 has an alright battery life but it drains itself at odd times. For example last night I forgot to leave it on charge and lost a third of its battery life just doing nothing for 8 hours. Yet there are sometimes when it goes through a whole 12 hour day with being fine.

I just want infinite battery

my optimus 7 will last a good 2 days with average use

very good handset actually

BGM said,
my optimus 7 will last a good 2 days with average use

very good handset actually


My Optimus 7 is two days too! I made it with two and a half days...but that was too close to call.

DClark said,

My Optimus 7 is two days too! I made it with two and a half days...but that was too close to call.

Mine Omnia 7 can last 2 days easily too, but it all depends on how to use device and how often. I guess WP7 is good at saving battery life afterall. my previous phone on WM6 had same battery capacity, but lasted like 3x times sorter and was around 5x less powerful at the same time. Then again it's all about how you use your device and apps, some 3rd party apps can drain battery in no time.

Gaffney said,
http://www.sciencentral.com/ar...w.php3?article_id=218392803

Batteries will become a lot better. Chemical batteries can only go so far and last a vertain amount of time.

I was going to point out that article, but you beat me to it. This is still a while off though, as manufacturing costs could be prohibitive initially. Also, what's the incentive of the carriers for promoting technology that lets you use your service more frequently or for longer periods?

Glen said,

I was going to point out that article, but you beat me to it. This is still a while off though, as manufacturing costs could be prohibitive initially. Also, what's the incentive of the carriers for promoting technology that lets you use your service more frequently or for longer periods?

have you guys noticed the date of that article? And read the last paragraph? enough said

XerXis said,

have you guys noticed the date of that article? And read the last paragraph? enough said


Obviously it either never happened, or like most energy efficient projects - have been bought out. (Probably by the oil companies)

Raa said,

Obviously it either never happened, or like most energy efficient projects - have been bought out. (Probably by the oil companies)

As the oil companies are making a killing by me charging my phone everyday. May I remind you that most modern grids utilize non-refined products for energy (hydro, nuclear, coal, etc).

DClark said,

As the oil companies are making a killing by me charging my phone everyday. May I remind you that most modern grids utilize non-refined products for energy (hydro, nuclear, coal, etc).

Did you notice the part where it said it could find its best use in a hybrid car?

she has a very valid point, i am increasingly ****ed off at the battery life on mobile devices..

they should stop ramming new features in and start working on the battery!!

****ed me right off..

The best part is when my friends have like 10 apps going at once, such as aim,facebook,kik messenger,tikl,news apps,twitter etc... Yet they complain when the battery lasts only 5 hours before charging it again.

Friends! Y U no Smart!

I just bought a new android phone last week and love it. Although, yes, the battery does suck. It's so bad that I almost feel guilty using my phone for what it's meant to be used for because, "I might drain the battery". Kind of ironic.

I'm an unfortunate regular visitor to your scenario example. I tend to have a communication break down moment trying to describe why USB Power Adaptor != USB Cable and why it's not charging because they do not have Administrative rights or port amperage/power saving issues. It's a constant headache.

Man, I guess I am spoiled. My LG Dare lasts 5 days without a charge. Guess I'll be in for an adjustment with these newer phones when I upgrade this year.

I find it funny how they didn't notice the low battery indicator, or didn't even contemplate attempting to charge it in the first place.

Idiocracy to begin with. But I agree on the fact that mobile battery life is abysmal now, my iPhone 3GS barely manages to last until the evening, but then again that's because I use it.

Chasethebase said,
I find it funny how they didn't notice the low battery indicator, or didn't even contemplate attempting to charge it in the first place.

Idiocracy to begin with. But I agree on the fact that mobile battery life is abysmal now, my iPhone 3GS barely manages to last until the evening, but then again that's because I use it.


You actually USE you phone? That's your mistake right there.

TCLN Ryster said,

You actually USE you phone? That's your mistake right there.

So the answer to improving battery life is to stop using your shiny new toy?

excellent read.

I love my ****ty basic phone that lasts 3 days. solely because I live out of three houses and don't feel like buying three chargers. I only have to charge it at one house and it lasts the whole time.

PeterKD said,
excellent read.
I love my ****ty basic phone that lasts 3 days. solely because I live out of three houses and don't feel like buying three chargers. I only have to charge it at one house and it lasts the whole time.

At first read, I thought you said tree houses

I used to move around between sites, too (work, not home, but same concept really). My old Philips could last me more than a week. I specifically picked it for the battery life, even though Philips isn't really known for their mobiles.