YouTube celebrates its seventh birthday

They grow up so fast, don't they?

On this day seven years ago a little-known website called YouTube opened on the Internet, having been created by some former workers at PayPal. The site's popularity increased at an unprecedented rate, copyright was being violated left, right, and centre, and then Google arrived to save the site from being crushed by the community it had spawned. Since then it has only continued to grow in size after repeated redesigns and divisive channel alterations. Video networks, such as Machinima and eHow, all thrive thanks to the one site, and the number of hits on Justin Bieber's song 'Baby' are an example of just how large the traffic for the site is, albeit a rather disappointing example.

Assuming this article has taken you a minute to make it this far, 72 hours of video on YouTube has been uploaded; three days worth of video is uploaded every minute. This time last year it was only half of that. Over four billion YouTube videos are watched daily. Eight hundred million worldwide users watch three billion hours worth of video per month. But a picture says a thousand words, so some moving pictures should convey a little more information. It's hard to visualize YouTube's cultural impact, unless you had a video from the team... and you do:

So from all of us here at Neowin, Happy Birthday Youtube. We love ya!

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12 Comments

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As a YouTube partner, I'm grateful for the way YouTube has revolutionised communication with audiences from around the world as well as changed peoples lives

One of the smartest business moves Google ever made was buying Youtube. Who could have guessed how huge it would become. I'm really glad we are no longer stuck with crap like Real Media for web videos anymore; those were dark days.

I don't like how Machinima are signing on youtubers with lifetime contracts dragging them in by saying you will get 1/3 more cash per view but they forget to say that your views will most likely shoot down. The next big thing for youtube is live streaming.

Years ago, I remember encoding videos using RealProducer and Windows Media Encoder, then struggling to stream them smoothly over my flaky broadband. I created profiles for different connection speeds and video resolutions...it was all so cumbersome.

Without a doubt, YouTube changed the landscape for online video streaming. It's a truly incredible resource for so much great content. However, I wish the administrators could find a way to clamp-down on spammers - those folks who create hundreds of accounts, uploading clips that attempt to lead you to other sites. Recently trying to find memorable clips from TV shows is becoming a real chore - there's just too spam to sift through.

It'll be interesting to see what online video - and indeed the internet - will look like in seven more years.

Cute James said,
Years ago, I remember encoding videos using RealProducer and Windows Media Encoder, then struggling to stream them smoothly over my flaky broadband. I created profiles for different connection speeds and video resolutions...it was all so cumbersome.

Without a doubt, YouTube changed the landscape for online video streaming. It's a truly incredible resource for so much great content. However, I wish the administrators could find a way to clamp-down on spammers - those folks who create hundreds of accounts, uploading clips that attempt to lead you to other sites. Recently trying to find memorable clips from TV shows is becoming a real chore - there's just too spam to sift through.

It'll be interesting to see what online video - and indeed the internet - will look like in seven more years.

I agree but in the meantime try the YTshowRating extension for chrome:

https://chrome.google.com/webs...ebleofongajeodnhideeiapohgi

It places a like/dislike bar below each video and certainly helps sifting through spam.