YouTube Outage Might Have Been Caused by Pakistan

Pakistani Internet service providers may have inadvertently blocked the popular YouTube Web site across the world at the weekend when they restricted local access to the site, a telecommunications official said.

YouTube said on Monday that many users around the world could not access the site for about two hours because traffic had been routed according to erroneous Internet protocols. The source of the problem was a network in Pakistan, YouTube said in a statement.

Pakistan ordered local Internet service providers to block access to the site because it was running material insulting to Islam, a Pakistani industry official said on Sunday. A government telecommunications official said the initial order to restrict local access might have mistakenly affected users around the world. "The blocking of the Web site within the country might have mistakenly affected its worldwide service, briefly," said the official, who declined to be identified. But there had been no intention to block the site worldwide, he said.

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Seems quite intentional to me.

However, do remember that American and Pakistani cultures differ greatly. We might not think it's a big deal or anything, but their country has many religious laws and customs we do not understand. Ignorance = stupidity.

Wait so people from outside Pakistan start insulting Islam, so you pretend its not happening by blocking the site.

I think that's called burying your head in the sand

i didn't even know that was possible, in theory, it means that any big isp is capable of worldwide blocking of websites for a small amount of time. That's just scary

yahoo has some more info on it
http://news.yahoo.com/s/infoworld/20080226...infoworld/95563


"First, the Pakistani ISP should never have forwarded the bad BGP routing data to PCCW. Second, PCCW should have checked to make sure that the ISP was talking about its own domains before accepting the information.."One of the dirty secrets about the Internet is a lot of it is still a handshake deal," some network admin

Wow...scary that something can accidentally happen like that...think if someone wanted to screw a lot of the internet intentionally....