All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. BudMan

    Wifi vs wired connection

    Ah I think I see your problem, seems I reversed it when I typed it out, if you copied paste vs looking in the image I posted with the output.. Then yeah it makes sense.. Sorry about that! Its wlan show, not show wlan 😉 So you going to get new card? New laptop? Usb stick? On a PC - why would you not wire that! 😉
  3. The smart side loses to fools because there are far more ignorant people in society than smart people, and (particularly in an "i'm alright jack" society in America) playing to people's bigotry, racism, and ignorance is a far more easy and successful tactic than playing to their sense of decency. So many hints, but answer is still wrong. The ego is too strong with this one . Last time I've checked, humanity is at its peak of technological advancement, literacy, creativity and longevity. Nearly every single human being is paying large amount of hard-earned money to Social Services in order to support sick, elderly, unemployed and people in need. Legal system is set to make sure that people actions are rewarded fair. Economy system is not perfect, but one which reward based on the merit. Humans never lived so good in all its existence. Now, back to pessimistic view. Thinking about electorate as ignorant bigot racist fools won’t get you very far, because reality is not so doom and gloom. Also, trying to be generous at expense of others doesn’t look very virtuous, quite the opposite. There is a reason why quote "the road to hell is paved with good intentions" exist. Maybe you just need to see some things in a bigger perspective.
  4. Bruinator

    Wifi vs wired connection

    Maybe cut and paste caused it but then again i did the same today and it worked. Go figure :scratcheshead:
  5. Microsoft Weekly: Optional updates, GPU leaks, and free educational content by Florin Bodnarescu This week brought some optional updates for the newest versions of Windows 10, a bunch of education-related changes for Microsoft products, and even a leak potentially tied to the Xbox Series X GPU. You can find that below, in your Microsoft digest for the week of March 21 – 27. Optional updates While last week there were some optional updates for every supported version of Windows 10 except the newest and oldest ones, this week folks on 1903 and 1909 get some attention too. In case you’re running either of them, here’s what you need to be on the lookout for: May 2019 Update / November 2019 Update (1903/1909): KB4541335, build 18362.752 (1903) / 18363.752 (1909) – includes updates to fix issues when printing from a document share, performance issues with apps and playing DRM content, apps not closing, calendar dates appearing on the wrong day of the week when selecting the Samoa time zone, and issues with applications unexpectedly closing when a user inputs East Asian characters upon changing the keyboard layout. There is a fix specific to 1909 only, which addresses an issue that fails to retain the locale language setting in an OS image customized during system preparation. It must be said that the fixes mentioned above are merely the highlights of a much longer list, and that there is currently no known issue to report. On the subject of updates, Microsoft will be pausing optional ones (such as the one above) starting in May. These are referred to as C and D updates, after the week of the month they’re released. Naturally, updates released in week one are A, and those in week two are B. Patch Tuesday and security updates will still continue to be pushed through, and this change does not affect C and D updates currently in place or those in the month of April. As expected, there has been a bit of a shuffling of the deck in terms of usage percentages, with the November 2019 Update (1909) climbing from 22.6% to 28.2% usage, 1903 (the May 2019 Update) falling from 52.6% to 50.7%, and 1809 declining from 16.4% to 11.4%. Rather interestingly, 1803 usage went from 4.9% to 5.5%, 1709 from 1.2% to 1.4%, and older variants from 1.7% to 2.2%. As per AdDuplex’s speculation, this might be due to people working from home, booting up older PCs. But enough about the old, let’s talk about the new and forthcoming, starting with build 19041.172 from the 20H1 branch, which was released to folks in the Slow ring. There’s only a singular fix, regarding the Windows + J keyboard shortcut not giving focus to certain Windows tips, and one known issue which relates to Narrator and NVDA interaction with Microsoft’s new Chromium Edge. This build still needs to go through to the Release Preview ring before becoming generally available, and it’s unclear whether Microsoft wants to start its rollout to the general public as soon as the April Patch Tuesday or whether it wants to wait until May. Those in the Fast ring weren’t forgotten, as they got to play with build 19592 from the ever-mysterious Windows 10 vNext branch. It brought improvements to what the company calls “tablet posture” for 2-in-1 convertible devices, including more spaced out taskbar icons, the search bar being collapsed into just an icon, the touch keyboard auto-invoking when tapping a text field, and increased padding for File Explorer elements. There are also some other Tablet settings under Settings > System. As far as fixes are concerned, the Windows Search Platform (the Indexer) has been updated for better performance, the issue with ARM devices getting a bugcheck has been solved, as has the issue with DISM (corruption repair) getting stuck at 84.9%, Windows updates failing with error 0x80070003, and more. There are still plenty of known issues to be aware of, including some Insiders receiving driver compatibility warnings in certain virtual environments. GPU leaks Although gaming-wise things have been a bit quieter this week, there was one bit of potentially unsettling news. Earlier this week, AMD disclosed that it had been contacted in December of 2019 by someone claiming to have stolen “test files related to a subset” of its current and future graphics offerings, stolen IP which was then posted to GitHub. Unsurprisingly, the chip maker used at least two DMCA takedown notices against the Microsoft-owned code repository, which has translated into the content being taken down. The person that allegedly stole these stated that they posses code for AMD’s Navi 10 – using the RDNA 1 architecture - and the forthcoming Navi 21 (RDNA 2), as well as the codename Arden GPU, reportedly used in Microsoft’s Xbox Series X console. AMD has stated that the stolen files are not “core to the competitiveness or security” of its graphics products, and that it is not aware of any other AMD IP possessed by this person. In other graphics news, the Intel Graphics driver version 26.20.100.7985 is now out, fixing issues with Fortnite DirectX 12, and Microsoft is working on both OpenCL and OpenGL mapping layers for DirectX. Working with Collabora, the two companies will be using the Mesa 3D open source project, adding a D3D12 backend to its beginning with versions 1.2 and 3.3 of OpenCL and OpenGL, respectively. There is of course some gaming news, namely that Xbox One codename 20H1 has hit the Omega ring – the Xbox Insider Program’s equivalent of the Release Preview ring for Windows -, meaning the Redmond giant is prepping for release. Speaking of prep for release, the latest Microsoft Flight Simulator Alpha build should be ready for folks to enjoy next week, with episode 7 of the Feature Discovery Series, covering multiplayer, being already available to watch. Free educational content With the whole virus situation in current times, there has been an increase of not only folks working from home, but also kids learning from home. To help out, Microsoft has made a bunch of content for Minecraft: Education Edition free through June 30. This includes, under the new Education category, popular lesson plans from the Education Edition and ten different worlds from the Marketplace creator community. Among them, the International Space Station, and even the human eye. This content is available to Minecraft Bedrock on all platforms, which is to say Windows 10, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, iOS, Android, Fire OS, and Gear VR. On a related note, there’s now an Education category on Microsoft’s Mixer streaming service, of course geared towards online learning. Traditionally more of a gaming-focused site, it’s still interesting to see that there’s an expansion in the site’s offerings. Last but not least, Microsoft Teams has been updated with live captions, viewing of shared content when joining via cellular phone call, and more. This applies to both the iOS and Android apps, with iOS also getting the ability to long press the app icon for a shortcut to make a call, getting a tone and vibration alert for incoming calls while on a call, and other capabilities. The updated apps on either platform should already be available. It must be said that while Teams has grown by 12 million users last week, something which of course was a positive thing for Microsoft, the company has had to impose certain restrictions on services to accommodate the higher demand, as per the MC207439 advisory. These restrictions include the OneNote integration with Teams being read-only – unless you’re an education customer -, changes in sync frequency and limitation of attachment downloads to files smaller than 100MB. On the SharePoint side, certain backend operations with be rescheduled, videos will play back at reduced resolution, and Microsoft Stream will have people timeline disabled for new videos, with the default resolution being capped at 720p. The Fast ring Microsoft has acknowledged a Windows vulnerability that allows remote code execution. The performance of Power BI Multi Geo capacities has been enhanced this week, with Query Diagnostics for Power BI Desktop reaching its GA phase. New leaked Surface Go 2 benchmarks now show the device equipped with a Pentium Gold 4425Y. Microsoft’s Inspire in-person event has been cancelled, with alternative delivery methods still being debated. SharePoint mobile apps now have support for custom organization theming and branding. Microsoft has announced an expansion of its Nvidia partnership regarding the T4 Tensor Core GPU and Azure Stack Edge for boosting machine learning (ML) workloads. The Redmond giant has announced a slew of new capabilities for Azure Dedicated Host, including cost-saving reservations, maintenance control, and more. Edge Dev build 83.0.461.1 has now been made available, bringing in extension syncing. Logging off We end the column with an announcement about the Windows Insider Program. As you know, former Surface chief Panos Panay was promoted last month to lead both hardware and Windows for Microsoft. The Insider Program on Windows lost its leader nearly six months ago, when Dona Sarkar stepped down, moving to Power Platform advocacy. Now, Panay has named a brand-new lead for the program. The new Insider chief is Amanda Langowski, a 20-year veteran at Microsoft, who started out as PM for “Windows, beta & release programs”, then went on to be PM Lead and Senior PM Lead for Windows Mobile and Windows Phone, as well as Principal PM Lead for Windows and Devices. Starting in 2016, Langowski has been Principal PM for Windows Fundamentals, Flighting Platforms & Operations. She is the third-ever Windows Insider Program lead since Gabe Aul (2014-2016) and Dona Sarkar (2016-2019). Missed any of the previous columns? Be sure to have a look right here.
  6. Nick H.

    Wifi vs wired connection

    You must be entering the command wrong, I just did a test to make sure and it works perfectly fine on all my Windows machines. 🤔 netsh wlan show interfaces
  7. Redmi Note 9 Pro review: Go for the Max by Rajesh Pandey Xiaomi has been dominating the smartphone market in India thanks to the massive popularity of its Redmi Note series. The company redefined the budget mid-range segment a few years ago with the Redmi Note 3 and since then, it has always managed to push the boundaries further with every new Redmi Note device. The Redmi Note 9 Pro comes at a time when Xiaomi is facing increased competition from the likes of Realme and Vivo in the mid-range market. So, is the Redmi Note 9 Pro good enough to help Xiaomi continue with its market domination in India? Read my review below to find out. Note: I am reviewing the Redmi Note 9 Pro here, but the device is marketed and sold in Europe as the Redmi Note 9S. My review unit had 6GB RAM and 64GB storage space. Specs CPU Snapdragon 720G, 2x Gold cores @ 2.3GHz + 6x Silver cores @ 1.8GHz GPU Adreno 618, 720MHz Display 6.67 inches, 2400 x 1080 FHD+, 450nit, Gorilla Glass 5 Body 161.9x73.7x7.8mm (6.37x2.90x0.31in), 186g (6.56oz) Camera 48MP 1/2.25-inch, 8MP ultra-wide, 5MP macro camera, 2MP depth sensor Video 4K@30fps, 960fps Super slow-mo Aperture f/1.8 + f/2.0 + f/2.2, Front - F/2.2 Camera features Ultra nightscape mode, AI beauty, Macro video recording, Storage 128GB UFS 2.1, microSD card slot RAM 6GB Battery 5,020mAh, 18W fast charging Connectivity Dual-SIM 4G LTE, VoLTE, Wi-Fi ac, Bluetooth 5.0, 3.5mm jack Color Aurora Blue OS Android 10, MIUI 11 Price Rs 12,999/$180 Design The Redmi Note 9 Pro features an Aura Balance design which is an evolution of the Aura Prime design debuted by the company on its 2019 phones. The rear has a shiny solid color finish but the way it reflects light creates a very striking effect. At first glance, the rear design of the Redmi Note 9 Pro might look very similar to the Huawei Mate 20 Pro. It has the same squarish camera hump at the rear albeit of a smaller size. The symmetrical design does a good job of hiding the massive camera bump and ensures that the Redmi Note 9 Pro does not wobble much when kept and used on a flat table. Since the Redmi Note 9 Pro uses a 3D curved glass panel at the rear, it makes the phone easy to hold despite its large size. The front is dominated by the 6.67-inch FHD+ 20:9 Dot Display. This is a massive display by all means and one-handed use is going to be a struggle. The punch-hole housing the 16MP selfie camera is definitely noticeable since its size is pretty big. One can mask it by using a dark wallpaper and dark theme in MIUI 11, but some people are going to find it distracting. Xiaomi is using Gorilla Glass 5 panels at the front and rear as well as on the camera bump. The frame itself is made of plastic, though the device does make use of a metallic chassis which means it does not have any kind of flex. While the Redmi Note 9 Pro lacks any kind of IP rating, it does feature P2i splash-proof nano-coating. The bottom of the phone houses the USB-C port, 3.5mm headphone jack, and a bottom-firing speaker. The 2+1 SIM/SD card slot is located on the left edge, while the volume rockers and power button are located on the right edge. The fingerprint scanner is integrated into the power button. Since the button does not sit flush with the body, one can locate it without looking at the device. I will any day prefer a side-mounted fingerprint scanner over an unreliable and slow in-display fingerprint scanner and the Redmi Note 9 Pro is the perfect example of that. The fingerprint scanner is fast and reliable and works without a fuss. As for the volume rockers, they are placed a bit too high. I had to adjust my grip every time I wanted to change the volume and struggled to reach the buttons. The top houses a noise-canceling microphone and an extremely handy IR blaster. With the pre-loaded Mi Remote app, one can use the IR blaster to control AC, TV, music system, and other appliances right from their Redmi Note 9 Pro. Display You don't get any fancy high refresh rate panel on the Redmi Note 9 Pro. Instead, you get a massive 6.67-inch FHD+ LCD display with 450-nit brightness and a punch-hole in the center. Yes, this is not an OLED panel and it has a refresh rate of 60Hz, but for all intents and purposes, this is a great display. The brightness levels are sufficient, you are not going to struggle to read content outside in harsh sunlight thanks to the low reflectivity of the panel. The colors, contrast, and viewing angles are all great -- if not excellent -- and there really is no room for complaints here. Since this is not an OLED panel though, you are missing out on a few things -- the colors don't exactly pop as they do on AMOLED displays. The contrast ratio is good but pales in comparison to what an OLED offers. Lastly, there's no Always-On Display mode. The OLED display used in most budget mid-range smartphone is nothing to write about, and in comparison, I will any day prefer the excellent LCD panel of the Redmi Note 9 Pro. Measuring 6.67-inches though, the display is definitely on the bigger side which might not be to everyone's taste. Camera The Redmi Note 9 Pro comes with a versatile quad-camera setup which includes a 48MP Samsung GW2 primary shooter, an 8MP ultra-wide angle camera, a 5MP macro sensor, and a 2MP depth sensor. The device can also record 4K videos at 30fps and super slow-mo videos at 960fps. Xiaomi also includes a super-detailed Pro mode in the camera app which works even in video mode. It also works with the ultra-wide angle sensor and the macro camera. This Pro mode is far better than what you get in some other more expensive flagship smartphones. Below are some camera samples shot from the Redmi Note 9 Pro. They are a bit limited as I have not been able to go out due to the COVID-19 lockdown. Gallery: Redmi Note 9 Pro Camera Samples For an average joe, this is a decent camera by all means. The focusing speed is good and there is nothing really wrong with the colors and contrast. I will recommend one to take photos with the AI mode turned off though as otherwise, it ends up boosting colors a bit too much. The Redmi Note 9 Pro's camera tends to show its weakness in low-light scenarios. Photos come out noisy and they lack details. While the daylight imaging performance of the device is great, it is below par in low-light scenarios. The ultra-wide angle shooter offers a great level of flexibility, but its dynamic range and low-light performance are nothing to talk about. The macro camera is really handy if you love to capture close-up shots of flowers, pets, and other objects. Its quality is definitely a step-up from the Redmi Note 8 Pro and the Poco X2 thanks to the boost in resolution. It will obviously be wrong to compare the camera performance of the Redmi Note 9 Pro to other more expensive smartphones like the OnePlus 7T or even the Galaxy S10 Lite. Xiaomi has always been known to set benchmarks for the mid-range smartphone segment with its Redmi Note lineup of devices, but in the camera department, the Redmi Note 9 Pro definitely falls a bit short. Software Like all other Xiaomi phones, the Redmi Note 9 Pro runs on MIUI 11 that is based on Android 10. MIUI is a very heavy skin and does not resemble anything close to stock Android. On the flip side, it offers plenty of customization options and features that you are unlikely to find in other OEM skins. Heck, you can even customize the screenshot gesture if you want to! There's also a well-implemented Dark mode and navigation gestures that further enhance the experience of using the device. Xiaomi is slow in rolling out Android updates, but the company does tend to update its MIUI skin regularly with new features and enhancements. It also tends to update its devices for a long time, something that hardly any other Android OEM does for its mid-range device. My one major gripe with MIUI 11 on the Redmi Note 9 Pro is the number of bloatware it ships with. There are almost a dozen pre-installed apps on the device that can be categorized as bloatware. Thankfully, one can uninstall almost all of them. Another issue with MIUI 11 and its system apps is the sheer amount of notification spam they send. This really ruins the experience of using the Redmi Note 9 Pro for me and in many ways, it serves as a reminder that you are using a budget Android phone. Performance & Battery Life With a powerful 8nm Snapdragon 720G chipset, 4/6GB RAM, and up to 128GB UFS 2.1 storage, the Redmi Note 9 Pro performs without any signs of lag or stutter. Mid-range Android smartphones have come a long way and their performance in day-to-day tasks is now more than good enough. The Redmi Note 9 Pro's excellent performance can also be attributed to Xiaomi optimizing MIUI. Despite being a very heavy and intrusive skin, MIUI 11 on the Redmi Note 9 Pro does not skip a frame or bogs down when running games like PUBG or Call of Duty: Mobile. The GPU is also powerful enough to play PUBG on High graphical settings. Plus, the combination of the 8nm chip and the massive 5,020mAh battery makes the Redmi Note 9 Pro an ideal smartphone for extended PUBG gaming sessions. The base variant of the Redmi Note 9 Pro ships with 4GB RAM and 64GB storage. However, it is the 6GB RAM variant that you should be eyeing. While 4GB RAM is going to be enough for casual users, it will pose a problem sooner than later, so it is better to spend the extra money and go for the 6GB RAM version outright. I had the latter version and did not face any issues while multitasking with heavy apps and games open and running in the background. As for battery life, the Redmi Note 9 Pro is in a league of its own. When you combine a massive 5,020mAh battery with an efficient 8nm chipset, you are bound to see some amazing battery life numbers and the Redmi Note 9 Pro does not disappoint. I was able to make the phone last through two days of heavy use without any issues whatsoever. This included plenty of browsing, an hour of PUBG or Call of Duty Mobile, an hour or two of voice calls, streaming music on Spotify for a couple of hours, and more each day. One issue I do have with the Redmi Note 9 Pro Max is with its charging speeds. The phone ships with an 18W fast charger that in this day and age takes ages to charge it from 0-100%. Coming from the Galaxy S20+ which took just over an hour to go from zero to full, the Redmi Note 9 Pro's slow charging speeds were frustrating to stay the least. The massive battery does mean that you can get through a day of heavy use with around 40% battery in the tank, but even then, Xiaomi should have considered including a faster charging option on the Redmi Note 9 Pro. The company will launch the Redmi Note 9 Pro Max in India which supports and ships with a faster 33W charger. Conclusion The Redmi Note 9 Pro is priced at Rs 12,999 ($180) in India. At that price point, the device offers so many features in an excellent package that it is hard to find faults in it. Perhaps my two major gripes with the Redmi Note 9 Pro are its weak low-light camera performance the extremely long charging times. In almost every other aspect though, this device performs admirably and you are going to be hard-pressed to find faults with it. If the average camera performance the slow charging speeds are a deal-breaker for you, Xiaomi has a solution -- the Redmi Note 9 Pro Max. This is essentially the same device as the Redmi Note 9 Pro, but it comes with an improved primary 64MP camera that offers better low-light performance, a higher resolution selfie camera, and 33W fast charging support. Considering there is a very minor price difference between the two (Rs 2000/$28), buying the Redmi Note 9 Pro Max makes more sense than the Redmi Note 9 Pro.
  8. OPPO Find X2 Pro review: beautiful, fast, and expensive by João Carrasqueira In recent years, the smartphone market has been absolutely flooded with a multitude of Chinese brands, such as Huawei, Xiaomi, and OPPO. Usually, these companies start growing thanks to aggressive pricing, with equally powerful devices being available for much less than what you'd get from brands like Samsung and Apple. Eventually, companies like Huawei grow enough that they can afford to compete in the same price range as those two brands, and with the Find X2 family, OPPO has decided to do the same. Priced at €999 and €1199, respectively, the OPPO Find X2 and Find X2 Pro compete directly with the Samsung Galaxy S20 and S20+, and on the inside, they have a lot in common, starting with the Snapdragon 865 5G chipset inside. OPPO sent me the Find X2 Pro, which has 12GB of RAM and 512GB of internal storage, which can't be expanded. It has a 6.7-inch QHD+ AMOLED display with a 120Hz refresh rate, and a pretty interesting camera setup on the back. On paper, it seems like a strong contender against Samsung's flagships. Specs CPU Octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 865, single 2.84GHz, tri-core 2.42GHz, quad-core 1.8GHz Kryo 585 GPU Adreno 650 Display 6.7 inches, 1440x3168, 519ppi, 120Hz or 60Hz, AMOLED, 100% DCI-P3 color gamut, O1 Ultra Vision Engine Body 165.2 x 74.4 x 9.5mm (6.5x2.92x0.37in), 200g (7.05oz) Camera 48MP Sony IMX689 main sensor + 48MP Sony IMX586 ultra-wide + 13MP periscope telephoto (10x hybrid zoom); Front - 32MP Video 4K - 60fps, HDR10+, Front - 4K - 60fps Aperture f/1.8 + f/2.0 + f/2.2, Front - F/2.2 Camera features All Pixel Omni-Direction PDAF, OIS, Ultra Night Mode 3.0, 12-bit True Capture, Ultra Steady Video 2.0, 10-bit Live HDR recording Storage 512GB UFS 3.0 RAM 12GB LPDDR5 Battery 4,260mAh (2 x 2,130mAh), 65W fast charging 5G Yes; NSA bands: n1, n3, n5, n7, n28A, n40, n41, n77, n78, n79; SA bands: n41, n78, n79 Color Vegan Leather Orange OS Android 10 Price €1,199 Day one Design In some ways, the design of the OPPO Find X2 Pro is like most phones these days, with a metal frame and a glass-covered screen on the front, but to me, the back makes it a completely different experience. There are two models of the Find X2 Pro, one with a ceramic black backplate, and the orange vegan leather model I got, and while the former would still be an upgrade over glass, the vegan leather is something else. In general, I've never really cared much for leather as a material, but this phone won me over as soon as I touched it. The back is so soft and smooth to the touch, it's amazing. Every time I pick the phone up, it's like a reward for using it, it's just so welcoming and comfortable. It gives me a sense of durability compared to glass, too. Usually, I'm scared of putting my phone down on hard surfaces, like stone or metal because the glass might scratch, but leather doesn't have that problem. I never trust myself with phones without a case, so whenever a company sends me a case with their phone, I put it on immediately, but I have intentionally avoided that with this phone just so I can feel the vegan leather every time I use it. But it's not just the practicality of it that sells the vegan leather model to me, the looks help as well. You look at this model and it just feels special. The soft-touch and the look of the leather are certainly distinct, but then you also get the OPPO logo on this metal plate that feels almost like a badge of honor, and the metal frame around the phone and the camera module complement this so well. It's so much better than having a logo under a glass cover. The camera module on the back does protrude very significantly from the rest of the phone, so much so that even the included case doesn't make up the difference, and it has a ridge around the camera module to help protect it. But again, on this model, even that protrusion almost ends up feeling like an intentional statement, like OPPO knows this model looks and feels amazing and it's allowed to do things like this. Now that you know how much I love the back of this phone, let's look at the rest of it. On the right side of the screen is the power button, with a little green accent that gives it a little more flair, and on the left, you have the volume rocker. Around the sides and top of the phone, there are a few antenna bands. The bottom side of the frame has the USB Type-C port for charging, a speaker grille, a microphone, and the dual-SIM card slot. I'm not sure why, but my nano-SIM didn't actually fit in here, and I had to use a nail file to make it just a little bit smaller. As for the top edge of the phone, there's just another microphone there. Finally, the display on the front is has a round cutout for the front-facing camera in the top left corner and an earpiece above it, with very small bezels all around. I do have to mention that the protective film OPPO includes on the display scratches very easily, and I'm not even sure how it happened. You can always buy a new screen protector, or use the phone without one, but I wish it wasn't so fragile. I also don't necessarily prefer the curved edges on the side of the screen, but it's not a big problem. Display and sound With a 6.7-inch AMOLED QHD+ display with a 120Hz refresh rate, you probably don't need me to tell you that this screen looks amazing, but it really does. OPPO makes a big deal about this display, with HDR10+, peak brightness of 1200 nits, a 5000000:1 contrast ratio, 100% coverage of the DCI-P3 color gamut, 10-bit color, and color accuracy of 0.8 JNCD in the default display mode. You can make that even better in Cinematic mode, which OPPO says has an accuracy of 0.4 JNCD. That all adds up to a truly gorgeous display, and OPPO also did a good job of including wallpapers that emphasize the quality of the display phenomenally. And, unlike the rival from Samsung, the Find X2 Pro can, if you so wish, be set to 120Hz and QHD+ resolution all the time, though that will obviously be pretty hard on your battery. By default, both of these settings are set to auto-select, and that's completely fine in my experience, with the phone switching between FHD+ and QHD+ for the resolution and between 60Hz and 120Hz for the refresh rate. I have to be completely honest and admit that I'm not completely sure I can tell the difference in refresh rate in many situations, and even though I tried many times with games, I really can't say for sure that it makes a difference. I do feel it a little bit more with some of the software animations, but not so much in games or videos. The phone also features what OPPO calls the O1 Ultra Vision Engine, powered by Pixelworks' fifth-generation image processing chip. This enables a couple of things, like converting SDR video to HDR, and video motion enhancement. The first helps with colors, and it can make a significant difference in some videos that weren't originally meant for HDR displays, some things look a lot better with it enabled. The second capability is meant to artificially increase the frame rate of videos through frame interpolation, which adds new frames between existing ones to make motion appear smoother. By default, this is set to upscale videos to 60 frames-per-second, and you can change it to 120 frames-per-second, but that will force you to use the display at FHD+ resolution. I assume this is because of the processing power required to generate that many new frames at such a high resolution, which is a different kind of workload than just playing content natively in QHD and 120 frames per second. The display has a few other nifty features, like an adaptive tone display, similar to Apple's True Tone, which has a color temperature sensor and adjusts the display to match your surroundings. Plus, the automatic screen brightness learns your preferences, so it adapts to your tastes over time. I've always disabled automatic brightness on previous phones, but now the Find X2 Pro always gets it right, so I didn't bother. As for sound, the Find X2 Pro has stereo speakers, one inside the grill on the bottom edge and an amplified earpiece, and it supports Dolby Atmos. The speakers can get pretty loud, though not the loudest I've heard, and they don't seem to have any major problems at high volumes. Because it has two speakers, it's not easy to cover them by accident, so I never had any issues with my media viewing experience. Camera On paper, the OPPO Find X2 Pro has a very interesting camera setup. The main sensor is Sony's IMX689, which has 48 megapixels, but they're bigger than before, so they can capture more light. It also has features like All Pixel Omnidirectional PDAF, which is supposed to make it easier to focus on objects, especially darker ones, 12-bit true capture that makes images better for post-processing, and OPPO's Ultra Night Mode 3.0. On top of that, the ultra-wide sensor is also 48MP this time, and that uses the Sony IMX586 sensor we've seen in the main camera of many phones. Finally, a periscope lens with a 13MP sensor enables 10x hybrid zoom and 60x digital zoom. I truly appreciate the versatility that a camera setup like this can provide, and it's fun going through different zoom levels and see just how much you can capture from the same place. I love some things about this camera, but it also has its downfalls, and I have mixed feelings overall. For example, I've found that for subjects that are relatively close to the camera, it's really easy for parts of a picture to look like they're out of focus, even though they're not that far from the object you're focusing on. You get fairly sharp edges around one spot, and everything else looks soft. And the phone also sometimes struggles to focus on objects like smooth surfaces. Like many other cameras, it also struggles more in dim environments, and the night mode here isn't the best I've seen, though it does help. One good thing about it is that it can be used with all three cameras, so even if you zoom all the way with the periscope lens, it can still improve your nighttime shots. Gallery: OPPO Find X2 Pro samples The color balance isn't exactly perfect across all the cameras, but low-light environments make that more evident than other situations. Interestingly enough, the wide-angle camera can actually deliver more accurate colors than the main sensor in situations like that, as you can see in the last two pictures above. The first shot, from the main camera, seems to try to compensate the dim lighting conditions and things like they're in natural light, but the second picture, from the ultra-wide-angle lens, looks more like what I was actually seeing. The OPPO Find X2 Pro does pretty well in video recording, but it's missing the option to record at 8K, though that's not something I will miss. It supports 4K at 60 frames per second, though. It also has an assortment of features, like OPPO's Ultra Steady mode, which combines OIS and EIS to produce very smooth-looking video. It also has an Ultra Steady Pro mode this time around, but the only difference is that it uses the ultra-wide lens instead, and in that case, it's only using EIS. Another cool feature is Live HDR recording, which offers dramatically more vivid colors than regular recording modes. The problem I have with these features is that they all involve some sacrifices. Live HDR recording doesn't support 4K60fps and forces you to use 30fps, and Ultra Steady Mode just doesn't allow 4K at all. Plus, you can't enable both of those features at the same time, so you always have a choice to make. I also think the lack of super-slow-motion video is a shame, even if I don't have much use for it. What this phone does really well is audio recording. The three-microphone setup here captures so much sound, but usually only things that you want to hear. The first time I recorded a video on this phone, it was of some cascading water, and when I played it back I was blown away by how loud - but still crisp - it was. It seemed both louder and more detailed than what I heard myself, it was really impressive. Performance, battery life, and software The OPPO Find X2 Pro is one of the first phones to ship with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 chipset, and paired with 12GB of RAM, there's really not much left to be desired in terms of performance. Everything runs fast all the time, and I've never had any issues running any games at their maximum settings. It's fast, but that shouldn't be surprising. I ran benchmarks using Geekbench 5 and GFXBench, the first of which measures the CPU performance. Unsurprisingly, it's very close to the Snapdragon-powered version of the Samsung Galaxy S20+, though it pulls ahead in the multi-core result. In GFXBench, the story is reversed a little bit, and Samsung's offering seems to pull ahead by a small margin in most tests, but nothing too dramatic. The Find X2 Pro does support 5G, but only sub-6GHz bands, and even then, bands like T-Mobile's 600MHz spectrum aren't supported. But this phone isn't meant for the American market, which is where you see more carriers using mmWave, so it shouldn't be a big deal. Unfortunately, Portugal doesn't have 5G yet, so I didn't really get to test this. The battery on this phone is definitely one of its highlights for me. Not so much because the battery itself is great - a total of 4,260mAh isn't that much, especially with a QHD+ display and a 120Hz refresh rate. If I used the phone more heavily, especially when it involved watching videos or playing games for long periods of time, it struggled to last all day (though it usually still did). Of course, you can turn down that refresh rate and resolution to make the battery last longer. But what's really impressive about this phone is the charging speed. The 65W charger is faster than every other phone I've tried, thanks to OPPO using two separate batteries that charge at the same time. I've actually changed my charging habits because of this, and I just charge the phone quickly whenever it's close to dying. I haven't tested OPPO's claim of charging to 100% in 38 minutes, but it is incredibly fast, so I can just charge it in the morning while I get ready to leave the house, and it will be completely full when I'm ready to go out. Finally, in terms of software, the OPPO Find X2 is running Android 10, with OPPO's ColorOS 7.1 skin on top. The interface is still very much OPPO, and many features of previous ColorOS implementations are still here, like Eye Care, the Smart Assistant (which is still useless), and screen-off gestures. I do like the updated UI a lot more, though, it's sleeker and cleaner, plus OPPO finally added a dark mode. You also now get a choice of icon styles for your OPPO apps, so you're not forced to use the typical rounded squares. It still includes apps like Phone Manager to manage your phone's status, Clone Phone to bring data from your old phone, and the new OPPO Relax, which gives you breathing exercises and music to help you relax. Of course, some annoyances are still here, too. I don't like the placement of the confirmation key when entering my PIN to unlock the phone, and I hate that I can't easily use a third-party app to change the wallpaper on my lock screen. The software just doesn't give you a way to do that, and it sucks. Also, OPPO's implementation of the gesture navigation in Android 10 works great with the default launcher, but not as well with third-party offerings like Microsoft Launcher. At least it doesn't completely disable those gestures with third-party launchers, though, which some phones do. Conclusion I absolutely love the OPPO Find X2 Pro in almost every way. The design, especially the use of vegan leather on this model, is stellar and made me forgo using a case for the first time in years, it has a gorgeous smooth display, it's fast, and the battery is incredible thanks to the 65W charger. The camera is probably my biggest letdown here, but even then, it's really good most of the time. However, let me be clear that no phone that currently exists is worth spending nearly €1200 on, and the camera issues I faced, while not the worst I've seen, are a fatal flaw. No camera is perfect, but the only way you can justify a price tag like this is by doing everything as close to perfection as possible, and the camera here falls too short. With that being said, high price tags like this aren't news anymore, and if I wanted to sell one of my non-vital organs to buy a new phone, the OPPO Find X2 Pro would most likely be my choice over Samsung's Galaxy S20+, which costs €1,259 with 5G and the same amount of storage, according to Samsung's French website.
  9. Today
  10. Bruinator

    Wifi vs wired connection

    I've known that for over 20 yrs !!!! The command didnt work on my PC yesterday and on my desktop today and today it does on my laptop. Go figure......
  11. This was an issue with older Samsung devices, not anymore. They have improved a lot with One UI.
  12. I will also my friends who have s20. But I doubt it. Why have work desktops. I am very interested to hear who actually uses it and why/how it helps them
  13. That argument is also nonsense. People don't find other people's arguments to be the best arguments because they're the smartest person in the room, but usually because they tell that person what they want to hear. And a country that can elect an absolute fool like Donald Trump is clearly not one where rational arguments are a clear winner. Real evidence i.e. Economy data of 2017, 2018, 2019 shows that people made a choice, which made lives more prosperous. People are not as dumb as you think. Their choice was limited. Thing is that, smart person knows how to win by being smart and by playing dumb, because smart person can analyse both strategies and use them with high efficiency. In order to win elections, "smart" and "virtuous" side must answer two questions correctly: Why so called "smart" side is continuously loosing to "fools"? Why so called "virtuous" side is so repelling to "evil" voters? The smart side loses to fools because there are far more ignorant people in society than smart people, and (particularly in an "i'm alright jack" society in America) playing to people's bigotry, racism, and ignorance is a far more easy and successful tactic than playing to their sense of decency.
  14. If anything, getting updates thoroughly QA tested is more important than normal. If there's a really bad bug out there you really want to catch it before mass release, otherwise you're going to get a deluge of support requests and a furious bug hunt when you're chronically under staffed.
  15. The U.S. Government cannot gain a controlling interest in a public company. Stop spreading lies! Sounds like he has been watching too much TV. Nope. Try again.
  16. The U.S. Government cannot gain a controlling interest in a public company. Stop spreading lies! Sure they can. It's been done in the past. "Taking stakes in companies is not without precedent in times of crisis. The Bush and Obama administrations loaned the auto industry, including General Motors and Chrysler, which is now controlled by Italy’s Fiat, $80 billion to avoid the collapse of the industry that they felt would result in the loss of millions of U.S. jobs. The U.S. government spent about $50 billion to bail out GM alone. As a result of the company’s 2009 bankruptcy, the government’s investment was converted to a 61 percent equity stake in the Detroit-based automaker, plus preferred shares and a loan. The government no longer has a stake in the company. Just last month, U.S. Attorney General William Barr said the United States and its allies should consider taking a “controlling stake” in Finland’s Nokia and Sweden’s Ericsson to counter China-based Huawei’s dominance in next-generation 5G wireless technology." https://www.reuters.com/articl...ain-companies-idUSKBN21634I
  17. BREAKING NEWS - FOR ALL WINDOWS 10 MOBILE LOVERS LIKE ME😜 Here's how to install Instagram v42.0.2.0 on W10M💙 1. On W10M go to Settings and enable the Developer Mode: Settings -> Update and Security -> For developers -> Developer mode 2. From your PC, go to the following website which allows you to discover and download the file package directly from the Microsoft Store: https://store.rg-adguard.net/ as "URL link" put this URL: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/instagram/9nblggh5l9xt press the button on the right to get the download link. 3. Now you can download the .appxbundle file from the second link 4. Copy this file from your PC to your OneDrive so you can easily find it on your phone 5. Go to your phone, open OneDrive and download this file to your phone (for example, in the Download folder). 6. From your phone, open the "File explorer" app, go to the folder in which you have copied that file and launch it to start the installation. 7. Wait a few seconds and the Instagram app will be installed. If you open the Store app, you'll find it installed as Instagram version 42.0.2.0 😲, which is the latest version also available for PC ◾ It also works on W10M AU (14393.x) 😲 The app opens in landscape mode, but it works fine. It also supports the resuming from the suspended state! => Long life to W10M 🥂🍾
  18. dustojnikhummer

    Dell XPS 13 unboxing and first impressions

    Don't tell me you still can't get the XPS with more than 16GBs of RAM
  19. dustojnikhummer

    Dell XPS 13 unboxing and first impressions

    HBM 2 is not happening
  20. It's sad that Microsoft essentially did it first, but failed to expand the Continuum feature set before W10M was left to die.
  21. If you use Facebook Messenger, they recently finally made a huge update to the app in the Microsoft Store. It actually works very well now and they actually have someone officially responding to the reviews in the store. It used to be pretty bad, so I didn't bother with it, but gave it a shot again recently and it's much better than having it on a webpage.
  22. Skype apparently does up to 50 and works on multiple platforms. What's the advantage of using Duo?
  23. jebus197

    Best tablet with native HDMI out?

    Yeah, I have the S5E and it's the same deal. But I end up with a janky collection of cables and adapters popping out of here there and everywhere and have already blown a small fortune on these, with only extremely variable rates of success in getting them to work - and none have done very reliably. Hence I'm seeking the holy grail it seems in a tablet that has native HDMI out, has good battery life, a great screen and is highly reviewed among buyers. I'm not sure if such a thing exists. The Nvidia Shield K1 can do it apparently, but it appears to have production and quality control issues. (Going by the reviews.) (And it's old as stink.) Ideally I'd like to find something I can still buy, before the world ends, lol.
  24. finally managed to setup VSCodium on the MX-Linux (Version 19.1) Version: 1.43.2 Commit: 0ba0ca52957102ca3527cf479571617f0de6ed50 Date: 2020-03-24T21:03:16.125Z Electron: 7.1.11 Chrome: 78.0.3904.130 Node.js: 12.8.1 V8: 7.8.279.23-electron.0 OS: Linux x64 4.19.0-6-amd64 guess that this is the actual Version!?! . again the machine: MX-19.1 with Python 3.7.xy installed Note: at the moment VSCodium is not configured towards a python-development-system. These steps have not been made. conclusio: on the mx-linux i now have VSCodium besides ATOM-Editor - i like ATOM it has a nice Github-Integration. on a sidenote: on the Windows-machine (WIN-10) i have VS-Code Version: 1.43: see on Win10 i have the following data: 1 Version: 1.43.2 (user setup) 2 Commit: 0ba0ca52957102ca3527cf479571617f0de6ed50 3 Date: 2020-03-24T07:38:38.248Z 4 Electron: 7.1.11 5 Chrome: 78.0.3904.130 6 Node.js: 12.8.1 7 V8: 7.8.279.23-electron.0 8 OS: Windows_NT x64 10.0.18363 at the moment i struggle with the following message: NodeJS not detected on this machine, which is required for Pymakr to work. See the Pymakr readme for dependancies. well back to the Linux-machine with MX-Linux version 19.1 and with ATOM. on a freshly installed ATOM on MX-Linux: i have to setup a lot. for some test i run the code - taken from here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/60908216/how-to-handle-multiple-urls-in-beautifultsoup-and-convert-the-data-into-datafram see what i have got back bs4_request_10 Link: https://pastebin.com/C3V8vryr Traceback (most recent call last): File "/home/martin/dev/python/daad_studienangebote_url_liste.py", line 25, in <module> Main(urls) File "/home/martin/dev/python/daad_studienangebote_url_liste.py", line 20, in Main df.to_csv("data.csv", index=False) File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pandas/core/generic.py", line 3020, in to_csv formatter.save() File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pandas/io/formats/csvs.py", line 172, in save self._save() File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pandas/io/formats/csvs.py", line 288, in _save self._save_chunk(start_i, end_i) File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pandas/io/formats/csvs.py", line 315, in _save_chunk self.cols, self.writer) File "pandas/_libs/writers.pyx", line 75, in pandas._libs.writers.write_csv_rows UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode character u'\xa0' in position 39: ordinal not in range(128) [Finished in 3.134s] by the way: see more errors: gathered with bs4 scripts form SO within the last 5 days - runned here: bs4_request_1 Link: https://pastebin.com/sUmva6iJ bs4_request_2 Link: https://pastebin.com/Tt3XaG4p bs4_request_3 Link: https://pastebin.com/wf9VTvjs bs4_request_4 Link: https://pastebin.com/1s6LVqni bs4_request_6 Link: https://pastebin.com/tEsZxxEs bs4_request_7 Link: https://pastebin.com/55q4ewrq bs4_request_8 Link: https://pastebin.com/YNKAMUXH bs4_request_10 Link: https://pastebin.com/C3V8vryr i guess that i set up the machine /ATOM badly … - any and all help greatly appreciated. - regards Zero I recently have read an article on using Virtual Environments for Python projects. https://towardsdatascience.com/python-virtual-environments-made-easy-fe0c603fe601 and this one Comparing Python Virtual Environment tools https://towardsdatascience.com/comparing-python-virtual-environment-tools-9a6543643a44 guess that have to take care how i setup python on my linux-machine.
  25. LostCat

    Best tablet with native HDMI out?

    From what I can see the Galaxy Tab S6 (what they meant) can do it. But I only see a USB-C port so I assume it's through that. Still should qualify as native - https://www.hdmi.org/spec/typec
  1. Load more activity
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up