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  2. my WI-FI driver was down after udate, connected by cable and installed old driver from 2015y
  3. I have looked into small form factor computers for some time now because I have a great fiber connection and would like to reduce my electricity bill. I could see my future "PC" just being a dumb terminal where everything is done on a server. Full loop actually to the old UNIX terminal days, just 4k, 60 FPS streaming Let's say the service costs $30; then it's silly to rent the service versus to buy the original console. Also, is it a convenient service?. Not really because it requires a good internet, something that we usually don't have (using cable) and on mobile (and this later is usually metered). It's also not viable for a wifi spot (where the connection is spotty), and it is only practical at home (and only if we have a good connection, sans to share the Internet), and at home, we have a console. But I actually do have a good 150 Mbit fiber connection, so that wont be an problem for me.
  4. I’d ask you to elaborate, but we already know you hit and quit threads so I won’t. Basically they don't need the SD Association's permission to be able to equip their phones with SD card slots. The association, much like the USB Implementers Forum or the Wireless Power Consortium just standardizes the technology to prevent fragmentation. They can just call it something else and make all existing SD storage compatible. Source that this falls under FRAND? If they are claiming this power to ban, it sounds like it isn’t under it. Nowhere does it say Huawei was banned from providing SD expansion in their phones, which this association doesn't have the power to any way. They were just removed from their list of contributors which means they no longer have a say in how the standard evolves in the future. Huawei actually has their own standard which is faster than SD, so this has zero effect on them. I’m not gonna lie, I’ve not investigated past the article here, but yeah, it does say they are banned from doing so. Huawei being removed from the list, the company can no longer support this kind of external storage in its devices.
  5. I’d ask you to elaborate, but we already know you hit and quit threads so I won’t. Basically they don't need the SD Association's permission to be able to equip their phones with SD card slots. The association, much like the USB Implementers Forum or the Wireless Power Consortium just standardizes the technology to prevent fragmentation. They can just call it something else and make all existing SD storage compatible. Source that this falls under FRAND? If they are claiming this power to ban, it sounds like it isn’t under it. Nowhere does it say Huawei was banned from providing SD expansion in their phones, which this association doesn't have the power to any way. They were just removed from their list of contributors which means they no longer have a say in how the standard evolves in the future. Huawei actually has their own standard which is faster than SD, so this has zero effect on them.
  6. xMorpheousx416

    1903 v145 and SoundBlaster Z

    I'll have to check out that subreddit. I'm probably one of the last few remaining geeks that haven't joined reddit since it's inception... so maybe what I've experienced can help someone else. Also note: For those reading this thread. CU .145 is a Release Preview update... so, if anyone else is having issues with their sound card, you'll have to sign up for the Insider Previews via Settings. I'm on the lowest rung of the ladder "Updates and Fixes Only". Not going to say it helps, but in this case.. whatever changes were made, did.
  7. I just might get that 2020 iPhone with the full-screen Touch ID. I'll be in the market for a new iPhone by then to balance out my Galaxy S10e.
  8. Not a chance, it will be a multitude of that, maybe starting at $15 for a 30fps 1080p stream or so. and then you will have to have the bandwidth to to support that on top
  9. I don't know why some people hate FaceID. I've come from Xiaomi Mi5 which had spectacularly fast fingerprint scanner. And now I have iPhone XR. And I actually really like FaceID. I hope Apple won't ditch it, but would instead add TouchID as an extra instead of replacement. So you can use either of them or even both for two step authentication for extra security.
  10. KB4497935 seems to have fixed the Settings-Apps crash I mentioned earlier upthread.
  11. Since I read the first reviews (and got my jaw off the floor over the pricing and availability), I've called the 3a (as a series) the Sane Smartphone - and it has exactly diddly to do with the camera. First off, for the first time, except for the VZW-specific version, it can go to any carrier in North America out of the box. (This has never been true of the Pixel.) Then there is the reality that every Pixel has been supported by the latest build of Android - directly from Google - and before anybody else. (It's just as true of most AOSP-based Android-ROMs - the exceptions have been few - and now with this phone, said exceptions will likely decrease in number.) Then there is the price - it's sane. Even the 3a XL is sanely priced - it's less than $500USD. Note that the camera hasn't come up at all. There's a reason for that - I don't need a King of Phone-based Cameras. Some people do (my Mom, for example - it's why I pulled the trigger on this same phone for her); however, for me, said camera is Silly Overkill. For me, the 3a XL is about length and strength of support - number of phones with this length and strength of support that are NOT from Apple, and are at this price - exactly one other than the 3a XL: the 3a. I have large hands, and thus prefer a larger phone. The 3a XL fits the need, at a sane price. The fact that it fits my Mom - and me - for different reasons - makes the 3a XL a scary phone. (Even nicer, I can get the same case that I have for my current phone - the SUPCASE UNICORN BEETLE - for the 3a XL. If you've seen - or better yet, owned - a SUPCASE UNICORN BEETLE or UNICORN BEETLE PRO, you get why I like them; they are tanks at sane prices. They even include belt clips.)
  12. Today
  13. FloatingFatMan

    SpaceX Updates  (Thread 9)

    I can't access the article in the UK... What are the chances some of these parts ended up in the exploded Dragon 2 capsule?
  14. Memorial Day deal: Choose any Private Internet Access VPN plan for an additional 25% off by Steven Parker Today's highlighted Memorial Day deal comes via our Apps + Software section of the Neowin Deals store, where you can save an additional 25% off any discounted plan to Private Internet Access VPN. Trust in an industry-leading VPN: Surf the web anonymously and without restriction. What's the deal? Block hackers and government spies, even when you're connected to public Wi-Fi, thanks to Private Internet Access. High-level encryption ensure you’ll put an end to incessant digital advertising, while IP cloaking gives you access to the Internet uncensored from anywhere. With Private Internet Access, the only gateways to the outside Internet are the ones you open. Bypass censored & geographically blocked websites, apps and services Enjoy a more intuitive & robust experience via the new VPN client Protect your identity by masking your location & IP address Block ads, trackers & malware w/ the new MACE feature Surf at blazing speed on 5 devices simultaneously w/ unlimited bandwidth Encrypt your data w/ the cryptographically secure Blowfish CBC algorithm Includes SOCKS5 proxy Block unwanted connections w/ an advanced firewall Access more than 3,160+ servers in 33 countries Good to know Max number of devices: 5 simultaneously Updates included Redemption deadline: redeem your code within 30 days of purchase For full terms and license info please click here. What's the benefit? The following plans are up for grabs: One-year subscription was $119.40 now $49.99 - that's a 58% discount Two-year subscription was $238.80 now $59.99 - that's a 74% discount Three-year subscription was $358.20 now $79.99 - that's a 77% discount Apply the WEEKEND25 coupon code when checking out your purchase for an additional 25% off and the prices drop to: One-year subscription = now $37.50 - saving an additional $12.49 Two-year subscription = now $45.00 - saving an additional $14.99 Three-year subscription = now $60.00 - saving an additional $19.99 >> Get this deal, or learn more about it here << See all of our current Apps + Software · This is a time-limited offer that ends soon. Save even more! Stick with Neowin Deals and earn credit or even deeper discounts. Check out our recent deals here or on the Neowin Deals site. For every $25 spent, you get $1 credit added to your Neowin Deals account. Refer the deal for $10 credit via social media or email and if it results in a purchase of at least $10, you'll get $10 credit added to your account. 10% off for first-time buyers: be sure not to dismiss the popup offer to subscribe to email updates on the deals page in order to profit! Not for you? If this offer doesn't interest you, why not check out our giveaways on the Neowin Deals website? There's also a bunch of freebies you can check out here. Enter to win a iPhone XS Max 256GB + AirPods via Neowin Deals today! Also check out some of the great deals we have on the site! https://t.co/ficZIw1Bny #giveaway pic.twitter.com/6NPIYlpkZR — Neowin (@NeowinFeed) February 22, 2019 Miscellany and the fine print! In some cases, such as with Online Courses, a store credit refund within 15 days of purchase is possible if you are unhappy with it; this does not apply to all deals, so please do check the terms on the page before making a purchase. Check our other recent deals, before they expire, or our preferred partner software. How can I disable these posts? Click here. Disclosure: This is a StackCommerce deal or giveaway in partnership with Neowin; an account at StackCommerce is required to participate in any deals or giveaways. For a full description of StackCommerce's privacy guidelines, go here. Neowin benefits from shared revenue of each sale made through our branded deals site, and it all goes toward the running costs. *Values or percentages mentioned above are subject to StackCommerce's own determination of retail pricing.
  15. if they use the new AV1 codec, it will fine. main issue will be latency.
  16. They could be, depending on your connection goes the bitrate.
  17. I just came to the realization that with this build, the flash drive creation part of the Media Creation Tool is utterly pointless. You can't actually USE the resulting flash drive to upgrade a computer. Yeah, you can use it for a clean install, but otherwise what's the point? You can copy the contents to a folder and upgrade. But yeah, good point. Ironically, burning a DVD is actually preferable to making a flash drive for this build. Way to go BACKWARDS Microsoft!!! But how would that work on most modern machines, even if there is a optical drive installed? My Blue-ray writer only work in legacy mode from the bios. i suppose it will work ok if you don't boot from the DVD drive and just use it to store the update on for updating and not a clean install. I may try that, just to see, easy enough to my computer back to it original state as i have image back up and i am having a lazy day today as I don't feel 100%. Yeah, I meant for doing an upgrade, a DVD would be preferable. For doing a clean install, USB flash drives work fine.
  18. I have looked into small form factor computers for some time now because I have a great fiber connection and would like to reduce my electricity bill. I could see my future "PC" just being a dumb terminal where everything is done on a server. Full loop actually to the old UNIX terminal days, just 4k, 60 FPS streaming Let's say the service costs $30; then it's silly to rent the service versus to buy the original console. Also, is it a convenient service?. Not really because it requires a good internet, something that we usually don't have (using cable) and on mobile (and this later is usually metered). It's also not viable for a wifi spot (where the connection is spotty), and it is only practical at home (and only if we have a good connection, sans to share the Internet), and at home, we have a console.
  19. Are you claiming you understand the economics of Microsoft's Cloud technologies better than Microsoft? I predicted the demise of Windows Mobile since the very first day. And it was obvious for everybody but the wise old guys of Microsoft. ps: I predict the failure of Google online gaming service. Reasons: It's obvious: Google already failed in the past with some online games (not streaming but it is still a failure). Google has a service of 3d render farm and the cost is silly (in comparison with the competitors) and Google lacks games.
  20. Maybe I am misunderstanding you but if your just trying to upgrade from say 1809 to 1903 using your ISO file just right click the 1903 ISO and mount it and then upgrade by running the setup file. The released ISO won't let that happen as it blocks the upgrade when done with a USB drive. That bug is fixed with the latest cumulative update, the one written about here. Until MS releases a new ISO for general use, only DVD's work to upgrade to 1903.
  21. I just came to the realization that with this build, the flash drive creation part of the Media Creation Tool is utterly pointless. You can't actually USE the resulting flash drive to upgrade a computer. Yeah, you can use it for a clean install, but otherwise what's the point? LOL, oh dear, what is wrong with that company? i wonder how they hell they got so big. oh yes, the new update also do not like additional internal drives either. Yeah, maybe that's the reason it failed on my machine, it does have two hard drives. Absolutely idiotic that they have allowed this bug to make it into production. I guess I'll try disconnecting the second internal drive as well to see if it works.
  22. Windows 10 updates, Huawei trouble, and more: Episode 3 of the Neowin Podcast is out now by João Carrasqueira Welcome to episode 3 of the Neowin Podcast, the show where Rich Woods and João Carrasqueira talk about all the big news from the past week. The past few days have been quite eventful, and this episode focuses mostly on the public release, after about six weeks of testing in the Release Preview ring, of the Windows 10 May 2019 Update, plus the trouble that's been surrounding Huawei for the past week. The company was banned from buying products and services from American firms, which seems to have affected its business. Before we get into the episode, here's a quick rundown of the things we discuss in this episode, along with the timestamps for each topic: 02:02 - The Windows 10 May 2019 Update is now available for actual seekers 07:05 What's new in the May 2019 Update 21:35 Deprecated or removed features 24:28 Known issues 28:56 Huawei banned from doing business with U.S. companies Google drops support for Huawei devices Huawei laptops removed from the Microsoft Store Arm cuts off Huawei SD Association removes Huawei from members list 46:36 Honor announces the Honor 20 family 51:27 Edge Dev channel on Windows 10 gets two new updates (kind of) 56:28 Chromium-based Edge is now available for macOS 58:28 Apple refreshes the MacBook Pro with up to 9th-gen Intel processors 1:02:16 Project xCloud technically supports 3,500 games 1:09:04 Google announces a new Glass Enterprise Edition The SoundCloud version of this episode is embedded below, but you can also find it on YouTube if you prefer that. And if you'd rather listen via a dedicated podcast app on your phone, you can subscribe to series by using the RSS feed below: http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:300504435/sounds.rss This will let you get new episodes automatically as they're released. Without further ado, here's the episode: Let us know what you think of this episode in the comments, and stay tuned next week for a new one with more exciting news!
  23. Google Pixel 3a XL review: You should buy this instead of a Pixel 3 XL by Rich Woods When Google announced the Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL at its I/O 2019 developer conference a couple of weeks ago, it pointed out a troubling trend in flagship smartphones, which is that the price of them keeps getting higher and higher. This sentiment inspired the two new devices, which promise the same features as a Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL, but at a much lower price point. Indeed, the Pixel 3a costs just $399, half the price of a Pixel 3, and the Pixel 3a XL costs just $479. While they pack features that we've all come to know and love like Night Sight and Now Playing, there don't seem to be a lot of sacrifices made. The new handsets take a hit in processing power with a Snapdragon 670, there's no wireless charging, and the body is made out of plastic. Ultimately though, it's a really good phone. Typically, when reviewing a device in this price range, I can appreciate the things that give it value, but at the end, I'm happy to go back to a real flagship. The Pixel 3a XL is actually something that I wouldn't have a problem using day-to-day. Specs CPU Qualcomm Snapdragon 670 (dual-core 2GHz Kryo 360 Gold, hexa-core 1.7GHz Kryo 360 Silver) GPU Adreno 315 Body 160.1x76.1x8.2mm (6.30x3.00x0.32in), 167g (5.89oz) Display 6 inches, 1080x2160, 18:9, 402ppi, OLED Camera 12.2MP, Front - 8MP Video 4K - 30fps, 1080p - 60fps, Front - 1080p - 30fps Aperture f/1.8, Front - f/2.0 Storage 64GB RAM 4GB Battery 3,700mAh, 18W fast charging Material Plastic Price $479 Day one Design The Pixel 3a XL comes in three colors, all with the kinds of names that Google thinks is clever: Just Black, Clearly White, and Purple-ish. The model that Google sent me is Purple-ish, and the name sums it up. It's a sort of lavender color, a light purple that's not too deep. In general, the Pixel 3a XL looks and feels the same as the Pixel 3 XL. There are some subtle changes though. The body is made entirely out of plastic, so there's no metal frame around the sides like the Pixel 3 XL has. Since it's not a glass sandwich, the metal frame isn't necessary. It does make me wonder why Google went with glass in the Pixel 3 series at all. The texture of the back is ever-so-slightly different, but barely noticeable. Plastic is cheaper, lighter, and it won't shatter. Since both support wireless charging and Google didn't go for any of the visual appeal that glass offers, what was the point? In bringing down the price point, I wouldn't mark the plastic body as a compromise, because it seems to not make a difference at all. With that being said, the Pixel 3a XL is lighter than the Pixel 3 XL, at 167g instead of 184g. It's also 0.3mm thicker at 8.2mm, it's narrower at 76.1mm instead of 76.7mm, and it's taller at 160.1mm instead of 158mm. The most noticeable of all of these things is the weight though. The larger screen on the Pixel 3a XL does fit into the smaller body, but it has a taller aspect ratio of 18.5:9 and a hideous notch. As is typical for a Pixel phone, the top portion of the back is glossy while the bottom is matte. Another benefit to the plastic seems to be that this isn't as easy to scratch as the Pixel 3 series. On the top-left, there's a 12.2MP camera module and a flash next to it, which is exactly the same as its more expensive sibling. Right in the middle of the back of the handset is a fingerprint sensor. Google hasn't taken the plunge into in-display fingerprint sensors just yet, and this mid-range handset isn't where it was going to start. On the left side of the device, there's a nano-SIM card slot. As usual, the Pixel 3a XL supports all major carriers, and what's cool is that you can buy it from anyone, except AT&T. If you're on AT&T, you'll have to buy it unlocked. On the right side, there's a yellow power button and below that, a volume rocker. This probably sounds dumb, but I like how the power button is a different color than the volume rocker. It's just easier to spot the difference visually. The black model is the only one that doesn't offer this, for some reason. The bottom of the device is where you'll find the USB Type-C port for charging, but more notably, the top of the handset has a 3.5mm combo audio jack. This is interesting because the more expensive Pixels do not have a headphone jack, forcing users to use an adapter. Unfortunately, the charging port and the headphone jack are not on the same side. Display The Google Pixel 3a XL includes a six-inch 1080p 18:9 OLED display. There's good news here, which is that there is no notch. I'm not even so much against notches, as much as I'm against the disgusting one on the Pixel 3 XL. That being said though, the bezels are pretty large on all sides. I'm OK with that though. The trend of narrow side bezels has its drawbacks, such as accidental touches on the panel. Many of the trends in phones feel like missteps, and I think that as a society, we've decided on form over function. The OLED screen does offer an always-on ambient display. This allows you to see the time, notifications badges, and so on. The good news about OLED is that pixels can be turned off, meaning that the black is true black. There are several phones around this price point that offer similar functionality from an LCD, and it's not good. Think of how when your TV shows you something black, you can still tell it's on; that's because it's backlit. With an OLED panel, the only pixels lit up are the ones you want to see. This also results in more vibrant colors, as the colors are rendered on top of true black instead of a backlight. The bad news is that it does not support wireless charging, and that means that you lose out on the functionality that you'd get from the Pixel Stand. For Pixel 3 and 3 XL owners, the Pixel Stand adds some Google Home features to the device. You won't get that with the Pixel 3a series. One thing that I absolutely love about the always on display is a feature called Now Playing. This will automatically tell you a song that's playing in the room. There's no need to pull up a third-party app, or any app for that matter. Just look at your phone and you'll see what song is playing, even if you're not connected to the internet. Camera The Google Pixel 3a XL includes a 12.2-megapixel f/1.8 rear camera, and that's it. It's the exact same sensor that's used on the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL, and Google is the last major OEM left that hasn't adopted a dual- or triple-lens system. Google's focus is and always has been on computational photography. The Pixel lineup is also renowned for having some of the best image quality on the market, with the most natural colors. You won't get the lossless zoom of a Huawei P30 Pro, but as far as image quality, it's one of the best out there. This is especially a big deal when you consider that the Pixel 3a XL has the same camera as the Pixel 3 XL. And then there's Night Sight, which works similarly to other solutions that pretty much take a bunch of images and combine them into one to brighten the picture. This is also a feature that has been praised, although as you'd expect, it does take longer to take a picture. Gallery: Pixel 3a XL samples Many of the samples that I took were meant to test out Night Sight, and the results are pretty solid. In many cases, it could see better than I could. The other big feature is portrait mode, which is done with a single lens on both the front and the back. The front camera is the one thing that differs from the Pixel 3 XL, which has dual front sensors. What I really like about this is that portrait mode doesn't zoom in on the subject. For example, with an iPhone Xs Max, you have to use the secondary 2x zoom lens for portrait mode, forcing you to reposition your shot. The Pixel 3a XL doesn't give you the hassle. Portrait mode just works, and if you hate it, it even saves the original photo for you as well. Gallery: Pixel 3a XL portrait samples Especially considering that these shots are taken with a single-lens camera, Google does a great job with portrait mode. If you look closely, you can see a slight imperfection around faces, but it doesn't have the stray hair effect, where a couple of out of place hairs look super blurry when they shouldn't. Also, it was smart enough to recognize someone behind me instead of blurring that person out. Performance This handset uses Qualcomm's Snapdragon 670 chipset, which is probably the biggest sacrifice on the Pixel 3a XL. The good news is that the sacrifice is barely noticeable. There's a tiny bit of lag here and there that you'd probably only notice if you can from something with a Snapdragon 845 or Snapdragon 855, but that's about it. I say this often in reviews, but those thousand-dollar smartphones that people jump at the chance to buy really offer more CPU power than the average consumer needs. The Snapdragon 670 is built for the upper mid-tier, and it definitely gets the job done. This device also includes 4GB RAM, the same as the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL, so you're not making a sacrifice there. The biggest hit is probably in terms of GPU power, so if you're heavy into mobile gaming, you're probably already looking at something that's more expensive. For benchmarks, I used Geekbench 4, AnTuTu, and GFXBench. First up is Geekbench 4, which provides a CPU test. You can see that the single-core score is right around that of the original Google Pixel, which was powered by the Snapdragon 821, Qualcomm's flagship processor from a few years ago. The multi-core score is higher though, which is fair since the Snapdragon 821 was a quad-core CPU, while the Snapdragon 670 is octa-core. Next up is AnTuTu, which provides an all-in-one test. Overall, the Pixel 3a XL defeated the results of 37% of other users, and it was the same in the CPU category. As I mentioned above, the GPU doesn't even do that well. The memory section is where the Pixel 3a XL does better. Finally, GFXBench tests the GPU. The results are about what you'd expect at this point. If you want to compare the results to other devices, you can find all of our reviews here. Conclusion The Google Pixel 3a XL is an awesome device, and I'll absolutely be recommending it to friends that don't want to spend a thousand dollars or close to it on a phone. Like I said earlier, usually when I review a phone at this price point, I'll acknowledge that it provides a lot of value for the price, but I'll still be happy to return to a flagship device when I'm done with my review. I don't feel that way about the Pixel 3a XL. This is a solid smartphone, and I was very happy with it. My only real complaint is the lack of wireless charging, which is something that I can live without. The other sacrifices made are mostly trivial for most users, such as the drop in performance and the plastic body. For just $479, half the price of many flagship phones or less than that, you're getting one of the best smartphone cameras on the market. You're also getting a solid FHD OLED display, which has cool features like Now Playing. And of course, you get all of the other nice things that come with having a Pixel. You'll be among the first to get Android feature and security updates, you'll be able to enroll in beta programs (although the Pixel 3a XL was pulled from the Android Q beta for the time being), and you get a stock Android experience. This phone is a solid buy, and unless you really care about wireless charging, I'd even recommend it over the Pixel 3 XL.
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