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  2. And therein lies the rub! In the case of criminal laws, the plaintiff is the state. So, the victims assume because they are not the direct plaintiff, their identity is protected. Alas, if only the world of justice was so simple. So, it is best not to commit that kind of indiscretion in the first place. All in-court victories are pyrrhic victories.
  3. Treyarch allegedly takes over from Raven and Sledgehammer on 2020 Call of Duty game by Paul Hill Image via Treyarch It seems as though Treyarch is taking over the development of Activision’s Call of Duty 2020 game from Raven and Sledgehammer. Each year since 2012, Activision has had Treyarch, Infinity Ward, and Sledgehammer make a game on a cycle; with this change, the cycle is broken and Treyarch will deliver its next Black Ops entry a year earlier than planned, according to three people familiar with the decision. Raven and Sledgehammer were allegedly working on a Call of Duty title set during the Cold War, but under the new plans they will take their work and contribute it towards the single-player campaign in Black Ops 5 which is also set in that time period. The change will be welcomed by players who were disappointed at the lack of a single-player campaign in Black Ops 4. According to two of the sources that spoke with Kotaku about the matter, one of the key reasons behind the change of project lead was due to arguments between Raven and Sledgehammer staff regarding the development of Call of Duty game originally planned for next year. Under the new plan, these two firms will become junior partners under the lead of Treyarch which has developed titles such as World at War, and the Black Ops series. It’s expected that the 2020 Call of Duty game will bridge across console generations, making it one of the first Call of Duty games on the upcoming PlayStation and Xbox consoles which are due in 2020. It should also be available for customers who want it for the current generation of consoles. Source: Kotaku
  4. It can do that? This feature exists but I don't think it's part of the your phone app. In Windows 10's Settings app you can set the computer to lock when a connected (Bluetooth) moves out of range.
  5. The perps are usually the angered ex-partner, they perhaps send pics/vids to their friends, family, etc. to get back at them for breaking off their relationship. I believe there is a right to know who made the allegation against you, and if you end up in court, that means the victim isn't granted anonymity by default. Simple thing is to not make these vids/pics at all, which is perhaps harder when the world is very digital these days... Even an encrypted app where both have delete rights won't stop this as anything that's seen can be copied.
  6. This browser will make a good dent in Chrome when it comes out. Its Chrome like enough for people to just use it. That depends, if the UI starts to look like the original Edge, then people will not bother with it. A lot of people may just use chrome because they think that the strange E icon is for IE and not for a different browser, so they may never have even tried the original edge, so why would they try the new one? Some people use chrome because it links into their google account. I think the main reason why MS is changing to chromium is more to do with business, some sites will not work with the original edge. Myself i will stay with cent, I see now reason to change and other people i have talked to say they will stay with the browser they use. Just been to the cent website, and it looks like adware. I am sure its not, but its the impression that the site gives me. Installed it and played With Cent for about 20 minutes. Settings for asking to run flash first didn't work. Switched it back and forth and restarted Cent several times. Made no difference. It was set to ask first by default even! After messing with that for a few minutes, tried getting back to the Cent website or forums. Site was down as it couldn't connect due to Cloudfare issue. That was all it took for me to remove it. Nothing spectacular about it! i had a very similar experience, i installed it. And it didn't seem anything special, asked me to sign into google. the download button didnt work the first few times i tried it! Was on my machine for about 10 mins at the most. It never asked me to sign into Google, but then i check all the settings and the download button works fine here. People say I don't give things long enough, 10 minutes is nothing unless it is really bad and if it was I would not be using it. i used the original Edge for a week on and off, the newer Chromium based Edge i kept on my machine for a couple of weeks and used it for a week or so. But as i said above, up to people what they use. I myself find it fine, but they do need to sort out the flash blocker, saying that I have not come along any site with flash for months.
  7. This browser will make a good dent in Chrome when it comes out. Its Chrome like enough for people to just use it. That depends, if the UI starts to look like the original Edge, then people will not bother with it. A lot of people may just use chrome because they think that the strange E icon is for IE and not for a different browser, so they may never have even tried the original edge, so why would they try the new one? Some people use chrome because it links into their google account. I think the main reason why MS is changing to chromium is more to do with business, some sites will not work with the original edge. Myself i will stay with cent, I see now reason to change and other people i have talked to say they will stay with the browser they use. Just been to the cent website, and it looks like adware. I am sure its not, but its the impression that the site gives me. Installed it and played With Cent for about 20 minutes. Settings for asking to run flash first didn't work. Switched it back and forth and restarted Cent several times. Made no difference. It was set to ask first by default even! After messing with that for a few minutes, tried getting back to the Cent website or forums. Site was down as it couldn't connect due to Cloudfare issue. That was all it took for me to remove it. Nothing spectacular about it! Fair enough, i must admit I did not know about the flash part as i use a flash blocker extension, but you are right it don't work, it will block flash permanently, but don't ask first. I have sent feedback, if they take notice is another thing. i am not sure what you think is going to be spectacular about it, at the end of the day it is a browser, which I prefer to use than Chrome or others. There is nothing spectacular about the new Edge and yet some people in here think there is, at the end of the day it is a browser. you use what you think is best for you.
  8. dontbeevil

    HP Chromebook 14 review: It's not made for multitasking

    but but chrome os is light and fast
  9. You can still Pay What You Want for this DevOps Bundle by Steven Parker Today's highlighted offer comes via our Online Courses section of the Neowin Deals store, where for only a limited time you can Pay What You Want for the DevOps Bundle. A six-figure career awaits when you learn the tricks and techniques of DevOps engineers. What's the deal? With the Pay What You Want bundles, you can get something incredible for as little as you want to pay. And if you beat the average price, you’ll receive the fully upgraded bundle! Included in this Pay What You Want deal, are the following courses: Pay What You Want (as little as $1) for the unlocked course: Understanding Chef: The Practical Guide Configure Cloud Infrastructure by Getting Hands-On Experience with Chef and unlock the following courses by beating the average price: Master Jenkins CI For DevOps and Developers Learn How to Build Automated Continuous Integration Pipelines with Jenkins Learn Kubernetes From a DevOps Guru Master Kubernetes to Deploy, Manage & Scale Reliable Containerized Applications Linux Shell Scripting: A Project-Based Approach to Learning Learn How to Shell Script Through Project-Based Training Docker for Everyone Everything You Need to Build, Run & Compose Docker Containers Project in DevOps: Build Real World Processes Learn Vagrant, Docker, Ansible, Git & Jenkins in One Single Course DevOps on AWS Learn How to Setup Your Infrastructure on The Cloud What's the benefit? The bundle represents an overall retail value of $834. But you can Pay What You Want for the unlocked courses (as little as $1). Beat the average price and you'll take home the entire bundle. Qualify for the giveaway! Beat the Leader's price and get entered into the epic giveaway, plus get featured on the leaderboard! >> Click to see the price to beat for the full DevOps Bundle << See other Pay What You Want deals. This is a time-limited deal that ends soon. Save even more! Stick with Neowin Deals and earn credit or even deeper discounts. Check out our recent deals here or on the Neowin Deals site. For every $25 spent, you get $1 credit added to your Neowin Deals account. Refer the deal for $10 credit via social media or email and if it results in a purchase of at least $10, you'll get $10 credit added to your account. 10% off for first-time buyers: be sure not to dismiss the popup offer to subscribe to email updates on the deals page in order to profit! Not for you? If this offer doesn't interest you, why not check out our giveaways on the Neowin Deals website? There's also a bunch of freebies you can check out here. Want to win an iPad Pro? You gotta be in it to win it! https://t.co/Uw1C3ng5py #Neowin #Giveaway pic.twitter.com/2ww76AA4tu — Neowin (@NeowinFeed) November 27, 2018 Miscellany and the fine print! In some cases, such as with Online Courses, a store credit refund within 15 days of purchase is possible if you are unhappy with it; this does not apply to all deals, so please do check the terms on the page before making a purchase. Check our other recent deals, before they expire, or our preferred partner software. How can I disable these posts? Click here. Disclosure: This is a StackCommerce deal or giveaway in partnership with Neowin; an account at StackCommerce is required to participate in any deals or giveaways. For a full description of StackCommerce's privacy guidelines, go here. Neowin benefits from shared revenue of each sale made through our branded deals site, and it all goes toward the running costs. *Values or percentages mentioned above are subject to StackCommerce's own determination of retail pricing.
  10. This browser will make a good dent in Chrome when it comes out. Its Chrome like enough for people to just use it. That depends, if the UI starts to look like the original Edge, then people will not bother with it. A lot of people may just use chrome because they think that the strange E icon is for IE and not for a different browser, so they may never have even tried the original edge, so why would they try the new one? Some people use chrome because it links into their google account. I think the main reason why MS is changing to chromium is more to do with business, some sites will not work with the original edge. Myself i will stay with cent, I see now reason to change and other people i have talked to say they will stay with the browser they use. Just been to the cent website, and it looks like adware. I am sure its not, but its the impression that the site gives me. Installed it and played With Cent for about 20 minutes. Settings for asking to run flash first didn't work. Switched it back and forth and restarted Cent several times. Made no difference. It was set to ask first by default even! After messing with that for a few minutes, tried getting back to the Cent website or forums. Site was down as it couldn't connect due to Cloudfare issue. That was all it took for me to remove it. Nothing spectacular about it!
  11. Today
  12. This browser will make a good dent in Chrome when it comes out. Its Chrome like enough for people to just use it. That depends, if the UI starts to look like the original Edge, then people will not bother with it. A lot of people may just use chrome because they think that the strange E icon is for IE and not for a different browser, so they may never have even tried the original edge, so why would they try the new one? Some people use chrome because it links into their google account. I think the main reason why MS is changing to chromium is more to do with business, some sites will not work with the original edge. Myself i will stay with cent, I see now reason to change and other people i have talked to say they will stay with the browser they use. Just been to the cent website, and it looks like adware. I am sure its not, but its the impression that the site gives me. Installed it and played With Cent for about 20 minutes. Settings for asking to run flash first didn't work. Switched it back and forth and restarted Cent several times. Made no difference. It was set to ask first by default even! After messing with that for a few minutes, tried getting back to the Cent website or forums. Site was down as it couldn't connect due to Cloudfare issue. That was all it took for me to remove it. Nothing spectacular about it! i had a very similar experience, i installed it. And it didn't seem anything special, asked me to sign into google. the download button didnt work the first few times i tried it! Was on my machine for about 10 mins at the most.
  13. JHBrown

    Microsoft is offering a $100 discount on the Surface Headphones

    Give it time. This will be a permanent price drop, and then expect further price drops around the holidays. I don't know which brainiac over in Redmond thought this was a great idea, and then approved it.
  14. What's next, protests against all the Star Trek series for having female computer voices?
  15. HP Chromebook 14 review: It's not made for multitasking by Rich Woods About a month ago, HP sent me two of its newest Chromebooks, the Chromebook 14 and the Chromebook x360 14 G1. While the names sound similar (I'm guessing it's a requirement to call it "Chromebook" if you're licensing Chrome OS), they're very different. The x360 14 G1 is a business device with high-end specs, while the Chromebook 14 is for consumers and the educational market, and it's much more budget-friendly. It's also HP's first AMD-powered Chromebook, using an A4 processor (A6 is optional). That comes alongside of 4GB RAM, 32GB eMMC storage, and a 14-inch 1080p display that includes multitouch. This particular model costs $329.99, although it starts at $269.99 with an HD display. Specs CPU AMD A4-9120C APU (1.6 GHz base clock, up to 2.4 GHz max boost clock, 1 MB cache, 2 cores) Graphics Radeon R4 Display 14" diagonal FHD IPS BrightView WLED-backlit touch screen, 220 cd/m², 100% sRGB (1920 x 1080) Body 13.26x8.93x0.72 inches, 3.48 pounds Ports 2 USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 1 (Power delivery, DisplayPort); 2 USB 2.0; 1 Stereo headphone/microphone combo jack; MicroSD card reader RAM 4GB DDR4-1866 SDRAM Storage 32GB eMMC Battery HP Long Life 2-cell, 47.36Wh Li-ion polymer Color Ink Blue OS Chrome OS Price $329.99 Day one Design The HP Chromebook 14 is made out of a polycarbonate material, although none of HP's materials are specific about that. It comes in three colors: Ink Blue, Snow White, and Chalkboard Gray, the former of which is what HP sent me. And I have to say that for a plastic laptop, it seems pretty slick. It has a textured body, and it feels really solid. It's MIL-STD-810G tested, so it's durable, and it's IP41 rated, which means that it can deal with some spills. It's also 18.35mm thick, weighing in at 3.48 pounds, so it's pretty easy to carry around. It's not the lightest PC in the world, but it gets the job done. It has a 180-degree hinge, which is meant to make it a bit more flexible. It also adds the ability to interact with the touchscreen in different ways than with a more standard hinge. As far as ports go, you'll find a USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C port and a USB 2.0 Type-A port on each side. The nice thing about the placement of the two Type-C ports is that you can charge it from either side. Many laptops put both of them on one side, which always gets in the way sooner or later. The bad news is that both of the Type-A ports are USB 2.0, meaning that they get speeds of around 480Mbps, much slower than the 5Gbps USB 3.1 Gen 1 ports. It's not a huge deal, since with a machine like this, you're probably not plugging in anything that needs more than that anyway. Still, USB 2.0 is just something that I'd prefer left in the past. On the right side of the device, there's a slot for a microSD card and a 3.5mm combo audio jack. The addition of the microSD slot is nice, allowing for an extra avenue of external storage. Moving to the inside of the device, the bezels around the display are a pretty standard size, something that you'd probably expect at this price point. Above the keyboard, there's a speaker bar with Bang & Olufsen speakers, and that's good news. The audio quality from this PC is pretty good, something that HP always seems to deliver through its B&O partnership. Display The model that HP sent me includes a 14-inch 1080p touchscreen, although it's also offered in non-touch and touch HD. For a laptop that's priced at $329.99, the screen is pretty good. It doesn't have the 178-degree viewing angle that you'll find on premium devices, but the viewing angle is way better than any Windows PC that you'll find at this price point. All of the screen configurations are 100% sRGB, so they have a good color gamut. It gets the job done, as it's not like you're going to be doing any high-end photo editing where you'd need the full Adobe RGB color gamut. The screen is very glossy, and it's a bit hard to use outdoors. The image that you see above is taken with the screen at full brightness. Again, it's better than I'd expect given the price point, but it's disappointing that there's no anti-glare option. The bezels on the sides are pretty standard, but once again, they're probably slimmer than other devices in the price range. The top and bottom bezels are a bit larger, fitting in a webcam at the top. Also, I think that touch is a key feature these days, with Android app support on Chrome OS. A lot of the apps that you'll be using are built for touchscreens, so it's nice to be able to use it that way. Keyboard and trackpad The keyboard is full-size with chiclet-style keys, and it's really nothing to get excited about. Like most other parts of this machine, it gets the job done, but it's not exactly top of the line. For one thing, the keyboard is pretty noisy. It makes loud clacking sounds when you type, and I can only imagine a classroom full of these things. It's accurate though, and HP also offers a backlight as an option. My unit, unfortunately, does not have the backlit keyboard, so I was unable to test that out. It's also designed to be spill-resistant, which does make this better suited for students, although that's a common feature of Chromebooks for education. Like all Chromebooks, it has the standard lowercase keys, something that takes a bit of getting used to if you're coming from Windows. Other differences include a search key instead of Caps Lock, no function keys, and if it's not obvious, no Windows key. The clickable trackpad is actually quite nice. It's large, which is a really good thing, and I haven't had any problems with it. But again, I just really appreciate its large size, with HP maximizing the space on the deck below the keyboard. Performance Performance is where the HP Chromebook 14 really starts to suffer. It uses AMD's A4-9120C chipset, which includes Radeon R4 graphics. The dual-core APU was first announced at CES as AMD's first chips designed for Chrome OS. Alongside of that, you get 4GB DDR4-1866 SDRAM and 32GB eMMC storage. In short, you get a mediocre dual-core chip, slow RAM, and slow storage. What this adds up to is a PC that's pretty bad at multitasking. If you're just browsing the web in Chrome, you're pretty good to go with a few tabs open. On the other hand, if you have a dozen tabs open at a time and you're running Android apps at the same time, this probably isn't the machine for you. In fact, you might want to check out the Chromebook x360 14 G1, which is a much higher end unit. But that's what I tried to do. In my testing of the Chromebook 14, I ran it with my normal workflow. That includes using a bunch of tabs in Chrome, and then I ran separate Android apps like Skype, OneNote, Slack, Microsoft To-Do, and some others at the time. This machine choked up really quick, and performance was incredibly sluggish. The best way to boost performance in this situation was to use web apps wherever possible, something that was easy to do with most of the Android apps that I had open. Battery life is great though, and what's interesting is that if you leave it powered on but asleep for a few days, the battery doesn't seem to drain, something that I've had trouble with on many HP laptops. When you wake it up, it takes little time to get right back to work, since Chrome OS doesn't take as long to wake as Windows does; it doesn't take nearly as long to boot either. Installing updates is a breeze. You'll rarely have to restart, but when you do, you're back at the desktop within a few seconds. I think that the main group of people that would appreciate a device like this are students at a younger age. If you're not trying to do a million things at once, it works pretty well. It can handle several tabs in Chrome, but probably only one Android app at a time before you'll notice significant lag. Conclusion As is the case with many devices around this price point, it's all about value. For $329.99, you're not expecting top-end performance and a bunch of bells and whistles. I do, however, wish that the performance was better. It was way too easy to get this PC to slow down to a snail's pace. This is something that's good for K-6 students, before they get a bit older and start having to handle some heavier tasks. I wouldn't send someone off to college with it though, although it's possible that the model with the A6 processor brings a much-needed performance boost. At the end of the day, the Chromebook 14 is a Chromebook with a solid display, a decent but loud keyboard, great battery life, and sluggish performance, all for $329.99. If you're looking to buy something for a student, or if you're looking to buy something for yourself and your needs are few, then it's not a bad choice. Make sure to check back soon for when I review the Chromebook x360 14 G1, which is a far more premium device.
  16. Scary article. First, where do the perpetrators find such stuff? Second, how exactly "those who come forward to police to report a crime are not given anonymity"? Does the police in the UK sell crime reportings?
  17. Fuelhandler

    Microsoft is offering a $100 discount on the Surface Headphones

    But they’re just so... ugly. Good to see Zune style discounts on these cans already. Lol
  18. DevTech

    HP - New monitor or graphics card?

    Nothing about your photo suggests a super-tight space. You need to plant the computer on the desk next to the monitor and then throw a plastic sheet on both when not using it. The frequency of Acidic Liquid Spray from cats must be limited to exactly ZERO occurrences.
  19. This browser will make a good dent in Chrome when it comes out. Its Chrome like enough for people to just use it. That depends, if the UI starts to look like the original Edge, then people will not bother with it. A lot of people may just use chrome because they think that the strange E icon is for IE and not for a different browser, so they may never have even tried the original edge, so why would they try the new one? Some people use chrome because it links into their google account. I think the main reason why MS is changing to chromium is more to do with business, some sites will not work with the original edge. Myself i will stay with cent, I see now reason to change and other people i have talked to say they will stay with the browser they use. Just been to the cent website, and it looks like adware. I am sure its not, but its the impression that the site gives me. Installed it and played With Cent for about 20 minutes. Settings for asking to run flash first didn't work. Switched it back and forth and restarted Cent several times. Made no difference. It was set to ask first by default even! After messing with that for a few minutes, tried getting back to the Cent website or forums. Site was down as it couldn't connect due to Cloudfare issue. That was all it took for me to remove it. Nothing spectacular about it!
  20. This browser will make a good dent in Chrome when it comes out. Its Chrome like enough for people to just use it. That depends, if the UI starts to look like the original Edge, then people will not bother with it. A lot of people may just use chrome because they think that the strange E icon is for IE and not for a different browser, so they may never have even tried the original edge, so why would they try the new one? Some people use chrome because it links into their google account. I think the main reason why MS is changing to chromium is more to do with business, some sites will not work with the original edge. Myself i will stay with cent, I see now reason to change and other people i have talked to say they will stay with the browser they use. This is the second or third time I've seen you mention cent. Never heard of it before but just did a search for it. May have to give it a try. What is it you like about it more than Chrome or Edge? As far as this version of Edge, I like it on my Windows 10 machines and wish they'd hurry up with the Windows 7 version to try on this computer. You can install the Windows 10 version on Windows 7 without any problems... Ya, I had it on the Windows 7 machine but it kept telling me I was running it in administrator mode. Couldn't find a way to not do that, so removed it.
  21. Should have waited for the Beta. (Sorry it had to be said)
  22. I think the voice used by them hasn't got anything to do with gender. It's easier for smaller speakers to project higher pitched tones, you can obviously use stronger materials and some smart engineering but size always matters. Someone may point out that they could use a high pitched male voice. There you are going to struggle to get the correct emotional tone and frequency range. The emotional tone is a massive factor in speech synthesis. You could use a larger speaker and a lower pitched male voice, but then privacy becomes a concern. Lower frequencies will travel further, especially when they have more energy. The people across the cafe will hear it, your neighbour downstairs might hear it etc. Also "Q The First Genderless Voice" has a terrible emotional tone and is a painful mix of voices, not a voice. I'm sure a better voice can be created but Q is a bad attempt.
  23. nubia Alpha review: A cool vision of the future plagued by too many missteps by João Carrasqueira When I first saw the nubia Alpha at this year's Mobile World Congress, I was immediately drawn to it. The huge display made so much sense to me, and it was one of my favorite visions for what could be done with flexible displays. So, naturally, when nubia gave me the chance to review it, I was stoked, and the company had a lot to live up to. nubia touts the Alpha as a wearable phone, which is in no small part thanks to its big display. But the version that's available worldwide doesn't have cellular connectivity, so that vision is immediately thrown out of the window. So, for the past two weeks, I've used it as a smartwatch, and the first I've ever used. It's actually the first wristwatch of any kind that I've used in a long time, so this review may come from a somewhat unusual perspective. Specs Chipset Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 Display 4.01 inches, 192x960, AMOLED Body 51.33mm x 47.1mm x 13.8mm Storage 8GB RAM 1GB Camera 5MP, 82º field of view Battery 500mAh Water resistance Yes (IPX5) Material Stainless steel (Black) Price $450 Design The design of the nubia Alpha is mostly marked by its tall 4.01-inch display, which comes in a whopping 1:5 aspect ratio. Not only does it face you, but it also wraps around the sides of your wrist. This is one of the few devices you can buy that has a screen that can actually be bent, and it seems to handle that just fine. There's no significant color distortion as far as I can tell, and despite the seemingly low pixel density, it actually looks great. It's an AMOLED, so you know you get true blacks and very vibrant colors, which I love. Looking closer at the display, it seems to have a protective film on top, which I didn't try to remove because it reminds me of the problems that come about with review units of the Samsung Galaxy Fold. It seems that this thin film might actually be necessary to help with the integrity of flexible displays, though I'm not sure why that is, or why it can't be merged into the panel itself. On the left side of the display, there's an infrared sensor, which is used for air gestures to control the watch without touching the screen. These work alright, but they're not perfect, and they're especially ineffective under sunlight, which messes with the sensor. I think the feature is cool as a gimmick, but its usefulness is questionable, and I think it could have been removed to make the watch a little lighter and smaller. Also on the same side is a side-firing speaker, which is loud and clear enough for my expectations from a watch. On the opposite side of the IR sensor is a 5MP camera, which can be used to take photos and record short videos in a pinch. I'll talk more about that later. There are also two buttons, one that serves as the home and power button, and another one to go back to the previous screen, though this can also be done using a pinch gesture. The rest of the watch is made of stainless steel, which is coated in a black paint job. The watch feels pretty significant on your wrist, especially in terms of weight. For someone who doesn't usually wear a watch at all, it takes some getting used to. Also, the all-metal wrist band makes me feel very uncomfortable when it's rubbing against the metal body of my laptop, so I almost always end up taking it off when I'm writing. I wish nubia had found a way to use a leather band while retaining the flexible display, because of the weight as well as that problem with my laptop. Another problem I had was setting it up to fit my wrist, which I felt was just a little too hard to do. It was manageable, though, and you only have to do it once, so I'm not too upset about the metal build. Software This is, in my opinion, nubia's greatest shortfall with the Alpha. The watch runs nubia Wear OS, which, for one thing, sounds too similar to Google's platform for wearables, and for another, lacks any kind of support from third-parties. There are some things I like about it, to be clear. The home screen features your clock, with a variety of watch faces to choose from, and below that, you'll have your currently running background apps, such as when you're tracking a workout or listening to music. Further below you have your six most recent apps. Above the watch face, you have quick actions to turn Wi-Fi or Bluetooth on and off, toggle between ringer modes, adjust the screen brightness, and so on. When you have notifications, you'll see them here, too, but that's also when problems start to arise with the Alpha. Notifications almost always show up twice on the watch, sometimes in two different variants. You also can't interact with notifications from your watch, unless they're SMS notifications. Dismissing notifications on either of your devices also doesn't affect the other end, so you'll always have duplicate notifications. In general, there's a lot I like about the UI, and I feel like it uses the big screen well. All of the menus are colorful and look great on the AMOLED display, and they're laid out vertically across the big screen, so you usually know where to go pretty easily. Almost all of the apps give you some freedom thanks to that tall screen. When an app only uses a portion of it, you can move the app along the height of the screen to look at it from whichever angle you prefer. But just as there is good, there is a lot of bad. nubia decided to build its own platform for the Alpha, and that makes some sense since no other wearable OS is known for its support for this kind of display. However, it results in an absolute lack of apps from other companies, and there's just not much that you can do with it that would make it a "wearable phone" or even a good smartwatch. The unit I tested at MWC had a WeChat app, and while I don't use the service, I was excited to try it just to see what it would be like to make video calls on the watch. Unfortunately, it looks like the international version doesn't include that app. I can't imagine nubia will be able to attract western developers to make dedicated apps for the Alpha, either. The watch also has fitness tracking capabilities, but even there, it's very limited. It has a heart rate monitor, and it offers four exercise tracking modes (even though its store page mentions five): indoor running, outdoor running, outdoor walking, and free workout. While tracking your workout, the watch will constantly track your heart rate, and it can also use GPS to draw the trace your outdoor runs and walks. There are, however, many limitations here. The GPS tracking produces a nice graph of the path you took, and it seems accurate enough, but it doesn't overlay it on top of a map. It ends up being just a drawing. The watch also doesn't save your health data over time, even if you use the nubia Wear app. I'm assuming this is a bug, because the app has arrows that indicate you should be able to go back to previous days, but it's still insane to me. And, for whatever reason, I've been in more than one situation where the watch thinks I've taken thousands of "negative" steps in one workout, and I'll have something like -50,000 recorded. I reached out to nubia and this will apparently be fixed in an update later this month. When that doesn't happen, the tracking works well enough, though the step count and distance measured are significantly lower than the numbers I get on Google Fit using my phone. Additionally, the limited number of workout modes means this isn't a great choice if fitness tracking is your focus. I do want to mention the Marquee feature because I think it's kind of cool, even if it's not useful in any way. Basically, you can write a short message on the nubia Wear app on your phone, and it'll be available to display on your watch, turning your wrist into a kind of billboard. It looks pretty nice, but the only reason I see for turning it on is bragging rights for having an expensive smartwatch. Also, even this has caused me problems - when I reached my target number of steps for the day with this enabled, I got a notification that froze the entire system, and I was forced to reboot. Camera The presence of a camera is another standout feature of the nubia Alpha when you compare it to other smartwatches. You'd probably expect such a small device to pack a pretty poor camera, and you wouldn't be wrong to think so. At 5MP, the camera on the Alpha isn't breaking any records, but I do have to say I was pleasantly surprised. While the resolution and detail are very much lacking, pictures from the Alpha do have some nice colors, which I liked more than I expected. I was also surprised to find that the camera app goes as far as offering built-in filters, which makes it seem like nubia wants this watch to be used by the general public, even though it fails in so many other aspects. The camera app can also record videos up to 10 seconds in length, and the filters work in video mode, too. It also pulls off what I still think is one of the coolest tricks of this watch. Just like other apps, you can drag the interface along the height of the screen, but in this case, that means you can take pictures at a variety of different angles while still looking at the viewfinder without any significant discomfort. If you drag the app all the way to the bottom of the screen, you can make the camera face forward, and the image will flip vertically so the photo comes out looking the way it should instead of upside down. In the samples below, there are a couple of sets where I test the included filters. Gallery: Nubia Alpha camera samples Unfortunately, while the watch connects to your phone via Bluetooth, transferring images requires Wi-Fi, so if you try to take photos or videos in a pinch, you can't share them until you're connected. Many times, I ended up just using my phone, even though I'd rather not, just because I could share those pictures in the moment. I also had a big problem when I was finishing up this review - I wanted to transfer some more photos from the Alpha to my phone, and the connection kept failing, even though other features were working fine. It worked eventually, but I couldn't figure out why. Battery life and performance Nubia made the unfortunate decision to use the Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 instead of the newer Wear 3100, which would have provided improved battery consumption. There's a relatively big 500mAh battery in the Alpha, so it still manages to make it through most days, but it's nearly impossible for it to last two days if you use any of its features throughout the day. Of course, without much in the way of apps, there's not a lot that can drain the battery, but the workout tracking can take a toll, since it turns on the heart rate monitor at all times and uses GPS to draw the path you take. Using the Marquee feature also affects battery life significantly, despite the fact that only a few pixels have to be backlit in an AMOLED display. As for performance, there's not much that can be said, considering how little you can do with the Alpha. In my time with it, I haven't experienced any visible slowdowns or very long waiting times, and everything seems to flow mostly fine. There have been times where I can't get the watch to turn on the display when I lift it, but that could have more to do with its recognition of my arm gestures. Conclusion I really wanted to love the nubia Alpha, and in many ways, I do. The look and feel of the watch, despite being a little bulky, are still great, and I absolutely love the tall display. The software on its own is also pretty decent, and I like its overall design and the attention to some of the little details, such as moving the interface up and down along the screen, the filters in the camera app, and some other things. But it's that kind of attention that makes it especially frustrating that nubia failed to nail down many of the basics of the functionality of a smartwatch. The duplicate notifications, the buggy and limited fitness tracking, and the lack of any kind of software ecosystem for developers make it very hard to recommend the Alpha to just about anyone, especially at the very high asking price of $450. At the end of the day, the nubia Alpha makes me feel like the future will be full of devices with flexible displays - just not this particular device. It makes me hopeful that someone -maybe even Nubia itself - can pick up this concept and deliver on it with a user experience that's actually good and more capable. As it stands, I can only recommend the Alpha to deep-pocketed enthusiasts who want to own what I believe is one of the coolest concepts in modern tech. If you're one of those people, you can buy it from nubia's online store.
  24. Theresa Ramseyer

    HP - New monitor or graphics card?

    Good morning I picked the monitor up yesterday. Haven't put it up yet, we had bad weather and warnings for worse. I'm not sure how I'm going to fit everything, and am also considering a new printer. I'll post later how things turn out. Just wanted to give a quick update. Have a good day / evening.
  25. I would venture that the law passed is based upon a prior existing law, as such it carries the baggage, potentially including the lack of clause relating to victim anonymity. Many laws work this way, they are created quickly to address a current issue, and then revisited to tidy-up later. Most of them are not revisited, and are left so vague. It left like that on purpose, so you can be charged with anything. Should you say something hurty on twitter.
  26. Apple charges less in the US! ($9) Oh how long OnePlus has come... #neversettle
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