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  2. You can still Pay What You Want for this Complete Adobe CC A-Z lifetime bundle by Steven Parker Today's highlighted offer comes via our Pay What You Want section of the Neowin Deals store, where you can Pay What You Want for this Adobe CC A-Z Lifetime Bundle. Cover the entire Adobe Creative Cloud and launch a design career with help from this 100-hour bundle. How does it work? With the Pay What You Want bundles, you can get something incredible for as little as you want to pay. And if you beat the average price, you’ll receive the fully upgraded bundle! Included in this Pay What You Want deal, are the following: Pay What You Want (as little as $1) for the unlocked item: Adobe After Effects: The Complete Motion Graphics Course Strive Towards a Career in Video FX by Discovering After Effects Or beat the average price to get the following items: The Complete Adobe After Effects Course Improve Your Videos with Professional Motion Graphics & Visual Effects The Complete Adobe Premiere Pro CC Master Class Course Learn to Edit Video Like a Pro Using Adobe Premiere Pro CC Adobe Illustrator CC 2018 Master Class Master the Industry-Standard Vector Graphics Application Adobe Photoshop CC: Your Complete Beginner's Guide The World's Most Popular Photo Editing Software Taught to You From A to Z Complete Adobe Premiere Pro Video Editing Course: Be a Pro! Master the Video Editing Program Preferred By Industry Professionals Adobe Premiere Pro CC Masterclass: Video Editing Made Easy Become Well-Versed in Video Editing for Any Industry Adobe Illustrator CC: Essentials Training Learn How to Use Adobe Illustrator & Complete Real-World Projects Adobe Illustrator CC: Advanced Training Take a More Advanced Look at Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign CC: Essential Training Work Through Real-Life Projects in Adobe InDesign Adobe InDesign CC: Advanced Training Take a More Advanced Look at Adobe InDesign UI/UX & Web Design Using Adobe XD Create Beautiful User Interfaces & Streamlined User Experiences What's the deal? This course bundle represents an overall retail value of $2,594 But you can Pay What You Want for the above-unlocked item (as little as $1) Bid the average price or over and take home the entire bundle. Qualify for the giveaway! Beat the Leader's price and get entered into the epic giveaway—plus get featured on the leaderboard! >> Pay What You Want for the Complete Adobe CC A-Z Lifetime Bundle << See other Pay What You Want deals. This is a time-limited deal. Save even more! Stick with Neowin Deals and earn credit or even deeper discounts. Check out our recent deals here or on the Neowin Deals site. For every $25 spent, you get $1 credit added to your Neowin Deals account. Refer the deal for $10 credit via social media or email and if it results in a purchase of at least $10, you'll get $10 credit added to your account. 10% off for first-time buyers: be sure not to dismiss the popup offer to subscribe to email updates on the deals page in order to profit! Not for you? If this offer doesn't interest you, why not check out our giveaways on the Neowin Deals website? There's also a bunch of freebies you can check out here. Enter to win a iPhone XS Max 256GB + AirPods via Neowin Deals today! Also check out some of the great deals we have on the site! https://t.co/ficZIw1Bny #giveaway pic.twitter.com/6NPIYlpkZR — Neowin (@NeowinFeed) February 22, 2019 Miscellany and the fine print! In some cases, such as with Online Courses, a store credit refund within 15 days of purchase is possible if you are unhappy with it; this does not apply to all deals, so please do check the terms on the page before making a purchase. Check our other recent deals, before they expire, or our preferred partner software. How can I disable these posts? Click here. Disclosure: This is a StackCommerce deal or giveaway in partnership with Neowin; an account at StackCommerce is required to participate in any deals or giveaways. For a full description of StackCommerces privacy guidelines, go here. Neowin benefits from shared revenue of each sale made through our branded deals site, and it all goes toward the running costs. *Values or percentages mentioned above are subject to StackCommerces own determination of retail pricing.
  3. Dell XPS 13 (2019) review: The webcam is finally on top by Rich Woods When I reviewed Dell's XPS 13 from late 2017, I called the design uninspiring, and I called out the webcam placement and the lack of facial recognition. In fact, the webcam placement below the display has become something of a joke, among both reviewers and Dell's competitors. Well, now Dell can make fun of it too, as even someone from the firm told me at CES. The webcam is finally above the display, and the company used a tiny camera module to do it. The design is also much sexier. The aluminum body color is called Frost, and it has an all-white interior. If you want the old gray body with the black carbon fiber interior, you can still get that. There's also a Rose Gold model with the same white interior. The point is that Dell took a laptop that used to be somewhat bland and made it sexy. Specs CPU Intel Core i7-8565U (8MB cache, up to 4.6GHz) GPU Intel UHD Graphics 620 Body 11.9x7.8x0.3-0.46in (302x199x7.8-11.6mm), 2.7lbs (1.23kg) Display 13.3-inch UltraSharp 4K Ultra HD (3840x2160) InfinityEdge touch display, 100% sRGB color gamut, HDR-ready enabled by Windows HD Color, Dolby Vision, 400- nits, 1500:1 contrast ratio, 178° wide viewing angle - 89° / 89° / 89° / 89°, touch – antireflective Ports (2) Thunderbolt 3 with power delivery and DisplayPort (4 lanes of PCI Express Gen 3) (1) USB-C 3.1 with power delivery and DisplayPort Micro-SD card reader 3.5mm headset jack wedge-shaped lock slot RAM 16GB LPDDR3 Dual Channel SDRAM at 2133MHz Storage 512GB PCIe 3 x4 SSD Material CNC machined aluminum in Frost with arctic white woven glass fiber palm rest (UV-resistant and stain resistant coating) Edge-to-edge Corning Gorilla Glass 4 on touch panels Battery 52Wh Connectivity Killer 1435 802.11ac [2x2] + Bluetooth 4.2 Miracast capable Audio Stereo speakers professionally tuned with Waves MaxxAudio Pro; 1W x 2 = 2W total Widescreen HD (720p) 2.25mm webcam with 4 array digital microphones; Far Field Cortana capable Windows Hello Fingerprint sensor in the power button OS Windows 10 Home Price $1,649.99 The Dell XPS 13 actually starts at $899.99, and there are loads of customization options. The base model includes a Core i3-8145U CPU, 4GB RAM, and 128GB of storage, along with a 1080p display. While the consumer model comes with Windows 10 Home, you can get it with Windows 10 Pro or even Ubuntu. If you get Ubuntu though, the fingerprint sensor and Waves MaxxAudio Pro won't work. Day one Design I enjoy pretty gadgets. There's something about them that makes them more pleasant to carry and to use. After all, if you're going to shell out a couple grand for a new PC, you don't want it to feel dull. The Dell XPS 13 does not fall short on that. This is a beautiful machine. As usual, the outer shell is made out of aluminum, although there are Frost and Rose Gold colors, rather than the standard grayish-silver. The palm rest is made up of woven glass fiber that has a stain-resistant coating to keep its Arctic White color over time. Naturally, if you still want that grayish-silver color, you still get the carbon fiber black palm rest. It's funny, because the Frost color really doesn't look all that different from a regular old silver, aluminum laptop. You know, the MacBook clones that we've seen so many of. It's a bit of a lighter shade though, and it's a really nice touch. This machine is made from a single block of aluminum, and Dell says that that means it's stronger than a device that's made from separate pieces. The build quality certainly feels solid, although Dell isn't boasting and MIL-Spec testing. As far as ports go, I'm sad to say that there's no USB Type-A anymore. Personally, I feel like it's still worthwhile to keep one of these things around, even if I didn't find myself missing it. It's the same story as with the webcam; you don't have to use something often to miss it when you do need it. On the left side of the device, you'll find two Thunderbolt 3 ports, either of which support speeds of up to 40Gbps, or they can power up to two 4K displays. Of course, if you run four 4K monitors off of the two ports, don't blame us when the integrated graphics can't handle it. You could, however, use an external GPU with one of those ports. To the right of the two USB Type-C ports, there's a battery indicator. This is a pretty cool feature. Just press the button and a number of those five LED lights will tell you how much battery you have left. It's a nice and easy way to see if you need a charge before leaving your home. On the right, there's a USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C port, a 3.5mm combo audio jack, and a micro-SD card reader. Other than the absence of USB Type-A, the selection of ports is pretty sweet. I appreciate having a micro-SD card reader, as I feel like it's one of those features that gets the chop when trying to hit a certain size and weight. Display, and there's a webcam on top of it As I've mentioned a few times, the webcam is above the screen now. Dell's XPS lineup has always been about creating an immersive experience, with narrow bezels that measure 4mm on the sides and 5.98mm on top. That's why the webcam has historically been on the bottom. The company favored immersion over proper webcam placement. When I'd bring up the subject, folks from Dell would simply ask me how often I used my webcam. The answer is, of course, never. We all use our phones for video calling now. Other companies mocked the placement of the camera, calling it a nostril-cam. While I agree with the sentiment of prioritizing immersion over a part that's rarely used, it's still something that you want to work properly when you use it. Now, you can have the best of both worlds. For comparison, the late 2017 model that I reviewed had 5.2mm bezels on the top and sides, so the top bezel is slightly larger. Still, it's not nearly as big as it would be if there was a full-sized webcam. And then there's the actual display, which is 13.3 inches and has a 3840x2160 resolution. If you want better battery life, go for the 1080p model, but this definitely provides the better experience. It's probably one of, if not the best laptop displays on the market. It uses Dell Cinema, a combination of CinemaColor, CinemaSound, and CinemaStream. CinemaColor utilizes Dolby Vision HDR, providing a wide dynamic range of colors. CinemaSound utilizes Waves MaxxAudio Pro, and CinemaStream uses Killer Wireless to prioritize streaming video over other apps. The UltraSharp screen supports touch, and it has a 178-degree viewing angle, or 89 degrees from any side. It also has a 1500:1 contrast ratio and brightness goes up to 400 nits. As mentioned, the narrow bezels enhance the experience, making it feel more immersive. And the good news is that you don't have to sacrifice webcam placement to get that anymore. Keyboard The keyboard has the standard chiclet-style, backlit keys that we're used to in Dell XPS laptops. The key travel is 1.3mm, which is pretty standard these days. It used to be 1.5mm, but shallower keyboards are becoming more and more common. These don't feel too shallow though, which is really good news. With Dell's XPS 15 2-in-1, the company used a new MagLev design, which was really shallow and hard to use. I'm glad to see that they haven't brought this over to the XPS 13. Overall, the keyboard is pretty standard though. It's comfortable to use, and it's accurate, but there's nothing about it that stands out to me like with Lenovo's ThinkPads or HP's new EliteBooks. It definitely gets the job done. The keys are a bit loud though. If you're a hard typist, you'll want to keep this in mind or you'll end up annoying people that sit near you. The trackpad definitely gets the job done as well. It uses Microsoft's Precision drivers, so it gets great performance and supports all of the gestures that you're used to. This is actually pretty important, as most of HP's laptops do not have Precision trackpads, and it's my biggest complaint about them. I'd call HP's use of Synaptics drivers its "webcam under the display", or that one big problem that keeps its devices from being nearly perfect. And of course, let's not forget about the woven glass fiber palm rest, which is quite nice. The textured feel is different from the rest of the pack, it's comfortable, easy to clean, and it won't stain. On a side note, Dell says that the total glass fibers in one palm rest stretch 117,500 miles, which is almost five times around the Earth, or almost halfway to the moon. Fingerprint sensor and the lack of an IR camera Sometimes I wonder about companies and their roadmaps. This is one of those times. Last year's XPS laptops included an IR camera for facial recognition, and they were the first to do so. This year, with the webcam being moved above the display, that feature is gone. I have to think that last year, when the facial recognition feature was introduced, Dell was already working on its shrunken-down webcam, and they probably knew it was coming this year. So, the company added the feature and then killed it in the following generation. The XPS 13 does still support Windows Hello with a fingerprint sensor in the power button. First of all, the fingerprint sensor works fine. Unlike laptops from Huawei and LG, you still need to scan your fingerprint after the machine boots up, which is a disappointment to me. With a Huawei or LG laptop, it actually scans your fingerprint when you press it, automagically signing you in when it boots up. Dell told me that they think that would be a security risk. The company has a certain benchmark, and if Windows takes longer than that to boot, it assumes that you could have walked away from the laptop in that amount of time. I still believe that facial recognition is the most natural way of biometric authentication for a laptop, unless you can automatically sign in by pressing the power button. But that's why it frustrates me so much that Dell added it last year just to take it away this year. Performance The Dell XPS 13 that was sent to me includes an Intel Core i7-8565U, 16GB RAM, and a 512GB SSD. If you want an awesome experience, get that. You can get it with a Core i3 or i5, also from the Whiskey Lake family, and Dell still sells the last generation models with Kaby Lake R. It's also worth noting that Dell makes an XPS 13 2-in-1, and one thing is not like the other. The XPS 13 2-in-1 uses Intel's 5W Y-series processors, as opposed to the 15W U-series chips. The Y-series is dual-core instead of quad-core as well, and you're sacrificing a lot of power if you get the convertible. I mention this because most OEMs these days put U-series processors in both their clamshell laptops and their convertibles. That's not the case with the Dell XPS 13 and the XPS 13 2-in-1. As far as general performance goes, the XPS 13 is great. It's similar to any ultrabook with a Whiskey Lake Core i7 and 16GB RAM. It's great for productivity-related tasks, and even some light creative tasks like photo and video editing. I always describe it as if you want to edit video all the time, get something with a dedicated GPU, but you can use this to edit video in a pinch. As far as battery life goes though, the XPS 13 was really a mixed bag. There were times when I'd get as little as three hours, and times when I'd get over eight hours. The strange thing is that I really can't tell you what I did differently on the times that it got less battery life. Obviously, doing heavier tasks will shorten the time, but it all seemed pretty random. You'll want to have a power cable with you. For benchmarks, I used PCMark 8 and PCMark 10. PCMark 8 provides three tests: Home, Creative, and Work. The Home test checks common tasks like video chat, web browsing, casual gaming, and more. This score is a bit lower than some competitors, such as the HP Spectre x360, which got 3,531. Still, it's fine. The Creative test checks more GPU intensive tasks like video editing and mainstream gaming. This one was about the same as the HP. Finally, the Work test focuses on productivity-related tasks like writing and spreadsheets. I also ran the general test in PCMark 10, just to see how it does there. The PCMark 10 test narrowly outperformed the Spectre x360, which got 4,036. Conclusion The Dell XPS 13 is a great all-around clamshell laptop, with a beautiful design and a small footprint. My biggest complaints are that there's no IR camera - particularly that Dell gave us facial recognition and then took it away - and there's no USB Type-A. Most consumer laptops still keep at least one USB Type-A port, and this one does not. Other than the beautiful design, one thing I really love is the display. Like I said, it's one of the best on the market, with its Dolby Vision HDR and narrow bezels. With Dell Cinema, it makes for an incredible media consumption experience. And that's what it's all about. It provides a great work experience, and a great play experience, all in a body that's pleasant to look at and won't weigh down your bag. Unless you're looking to buy a convertible, the Dell XPS 13 is definitely worth checking out in a laptop.
  4. DaveLegg

    neowin.com no longer working?

    This is now resolved
  5. I just switched back to Firefox, not for this but just generally!
  6. Today
  7. What would the timeline be if it was a SD, plumbing, or tank anomaly? Would NASA of cleared them for flight for DEMO 1 without thoroughly testing the SDs? We all know Shelby is going to be using the low res video in the next committee meeting.
  8. Also openjdk 11 is an LTS release similar to version 8 (9 and 10 were short lived releases). Many Android developers are going to stay on version 8 for a while too.
  9. DevTech

    Starting my own business

    Would that be hardware upgrades or custom software? Although, I find Security to be utterly boring, would any small bizz and upwards need ongoing security analysis and pen testing and intrusion detection/response etc (i.e. ye old "Defense in Depth")?
  10. It has a locked bootloader so no.
  11. episode

    Starting my own business

    Anything a user interacts with is where the repeat business comes from. And that is of course mostly the PC/Mac/device itself.
  12. DevTech

    Starting my own business

    On that point, he was just making a funny reply to my failed attempt to explain the usefulness of basic Branding... The rest of your direct experience seems like a well intentioned summary of your experiences. Maybe he could partner with a few guys to extend their skills coverage... Since you find network config to mainly be a one=off thing, which areas has your experience shown to be good for repeat business?
  13. episode

    Starting my own business

    L3 solutions is too similar to Level 3. They will go after you at some point if you choose that name, since you're in the same space. The other two names are horrendous. Since its just you, use your initials and security or computing or networking. Keep it simple. So ZZsecurity.com or whatever. Remember that you'll have to tell people the name verbally. So ZZ computing dot com is easy to remember. El 3 dash solutions is harder. ipxperts is impossible for someone to remember. Now, as far as running a successful business, you're going to have to branch out much, much further than doing only Cisco networking. You do mention Fortinet, but no small businesses use them in reality. (And Cisco doesn't really have the greatest reputation either.) Those are going to have to be your targets, small businesses and you build your way up. Don't bother with home users unless you're super desperate, they aren't worth the time invested. Doing a business users home stuff as well is one thing, but a home-only user isn't worth it. Learning and installing the Ubiquity lines is very easy, and they have a much better reputation for not being overpriced and are much easier to work with. In most larger installs now, I'm doing UniFi stuff from top to bottom and having literally zero issues anywhere. The thing is, when you get into a small business, they are going to want you to handle all of their IT needs, from top to bottom. In 97% of cases, they don't want to have to call a networking guy and then their regular IT guy for everything else. And that regular IT guy isn't going to want to have to manage your equipment and settings if he's handling everything else. So you're going to need the ability to work on all the rest of their problems in addition to setting up a network. The other thing if you're only planning on doing networking is that its a one time thing, more or less. You do the initial install and then you have to find a new client. That install may need support (ports opened, etc) but you're not going to make much more money off them after that. The constant search for new clients is tough, especially in an environment where unless someone is moving to a new building, they don't need new networking gear on a ground up scale, since they are already built out and networking gear very rarely 'dies'. I've been doing this for a while. My IT company is about to have its 15th anniversary next month. And the market wasn't as crowded as it is now. You're going to have a problem getting into places as 'just' a networking guy. If you're not comfortable doing the rest of the IT work, my advice is that this isn't going to be an easy move for you, and if you aren't ready to possibly go quite a while without many clients, you might want to rethink things. If your idea is to do this on the side of your regular job, that might be easier, but most people want support during regular business hours. One final thing - focusing on offices with meeting rooms and having names for the meeting rooms should not even be a consideration at this point. It can be in your business plan (you wrote one, right?) but the first few years should be focused on keeping costs down as much as possible. Sorry if this seems harsh, but just trying to lay out my experience as someone who started their own IT business.
  14. DevTech

    Starting my own business

    One day, A.I. Independent Entities will start their own businesses. You seem to have nailed the Uncanny Valley of how that conversation would evolve... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncanny_valley
  15. have you even owned a redmi phone? they are pretty solid and cheap for the specks they have, i currently own one and could not fault it besides not having nfc I own an MI (stupid name btw) and I have dropped countless of time.
  16. It's widely used in america, not widely used in the rest of the world. Too many rankings: https://techbeacon.com/app-dev...-rankings-which-ones-matter Java may not be #1 on every ranking but it sure as heck qualifies as "widely used" everywhere... I don't use it, but I have nothing against it. It works. Also, Scala, Kotlin, Groovy etc all run on the JVM. A bunch of stuff runs on .NET. C++ runs everywhere. Then there is the grab bag of everything else...
  17. Yeah the version of Java included in a Linux distro doesn't rank high on the things I needed to know today, or ever. I didn't realise that reading of all news items on Neowin is compulsory. I would have thought the rules would have allowed the skipping of items one is not interested in. I live and learn. As I (and presumably you as a Kiwi) live in an enlightened (mostly) democracy, everybody is entitled to have and to express their opinion. My opinion is that this article didn't hold my interest, and I expressed it. If that is a problem to you and your sarcasm laden sensibilities, I apologise wholeheartedly.
  18. It's widely used in america, not widely used in the rest of the world.
  19. MightyJordan

    The Big Wrestling Thread!

    ^^ /r/SquaredCircle mod.
  20. MightyJordan

    The Big Wrestling Thread!

    Well, he's been moved to the alumni section...
  21. In the beginning, Sun makes Java. Supposed to run everywhere and eventually almost achieves the goal except it is LCD crappolla almost everywhere... sort of like it's namesake JavaScript which was named to leach off the (short-lived) public popularity of Java. All the programmers at Microsoft start using Java which makes Bill Gates furious and so it is copied and extended into C# Oracle buys Sun and like most giant companies swallowing another, the original products tend to die off one by one and get replaced by whatever the Swallower originally had going... Java gets thrown out with the bath water and now RedHat which itself was swallowed by IBM has it... This article is actually Big News, but in a slow burn long term kind of way... And JDK 12 is out making it all even murkier... For overall daily stuff programmed in companies everywhere, Java is still #1. https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/ So what happens to it in the future is reasonably important tech news, more important really than "hey, it will take some time to make foldable screens actually reliable..."
  22. claire divas

    Starting my own business

    A new business opening is actually very special event and most joyful occasion for your near and dear ones. Though it’s a tough job to start a new business and the entrepreneur need more courage and strength during their way.
  23. Elliot B.

    Start10 v1.7

    Used Start8 and Start10 for years. Well worth the money.
  24. LOC

    The Big Wrestling Thread!

    Well true, but I meant more in general as a high profile kinda match. Is Dustin Runnels an actual draw in 2019 more or less. Also according to everything I've looked at online so far, he's still signed with WWE, just on hiatus because of the double knee surgery he had recently. So, Vince gave him permission to work AEW? I doubt it very much.
  25. MightyJordan

    The Big Wrestling Thread!

    I don't think it'll be the main event; it'll probably be somewhere in the middle, like Cody's NWA title match with Nick Aldus was at All In. Main event will probably be either Omega/Jericho or Young Bucks/Lucha Bros.
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