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  2. Jim K

    Could this be malware?

    The email is bull...they got your password from one of the data breaches (beyond your control) ... not from the method they wrote in the email. Just change your passwords to sites that have been compromised ... and don't use passwords that have been compromised (such as the one you "edited out" ... why are still using that one?)
  3. Using the GA on the phone is great because it can pull up relevant information on screen as you ask it things. The speaker-only versions of the GA are sorely lacking in this (as are its speaker-only competitors). So Lenovo's Smart Display would be bringing back the best of the GA's all-around abilities, and can be placed somewhere you wouldn't necessarily want to pull out your phone. Plus adding in the ability to play music and all the rest, it could turn a dumb room very, very smart.
  4. seeprime

    Malwarebytes 4 Beta released for download

    The UI is modern, and completely changed from the traditional MB look and feel. The free version bug, where it often could not be told to not start with Windows, appears fixed, scan was fast. It found a "malware" in Tor where there wasn't one. That's annoying, that it could break Tor browser, if you let it do so. Until they stop pushing premium "trials" onto free users which are often confused by the change, and which actually lowers the protection level since MB scores at the bottom of AV-Test comparisons (right below Webroot), I'll keep putting Super Antispyware on customer machines as a backup anti-malware program. I plan to keep it on my laptop, only there, to see how the beta works when updating the version.
  5. Today
  6. That display issue is a dealbreaker. I'd go with a different company, who can offer a 1080p/1440p display @ 500 nits.
  7. It looks like a very nice laptop. But what bugs me about it is that it doesn't support WiFi 6, and the WiFi chip is soldered onto the motherboard.
  8. SnoopZ

    Could this be malware?

    I also can't see them. Most people are getting flagged up there with something. Off topic i use Lastpass.
  9. That display, speaker and feature set make this smart display a keeper for sure. If we can run an FM alarm app on it, I'm game!!😍
  10. How dare they! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Chinese_inventions" rel="external nofollow">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Chinese_inventions Oh look! Another butturt person that chooses to ignore Chinese corporate IP theft and espionage today because of things the Chinese invented way back in the day. Nevermind the abuse of their human rights. https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/2...hin-the-last-year-cnbc.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...ionage_in_the_United_States https://www.businessinsider.co...ike-a-rolls-royce-phantom-4 https://www.prosperousamerica....n_cases_of_chinese_ip_theft https://www.theamericanconserv...ntellectual-property-theft/ What corporate theft? There are no designs for the campus that are copyrighted.
  11. devnulllore

    Could this be malware?

    This is the email in it's entirety: Hey, I know your password is: (edited out) Your computer was infected with my malware, RAT (Remote Administration Tool), your browser wasn't updated / patched, in such case it's enough to just visit some website where my iframe is placed to get automatically infected, if you want to find out more - Google: "Drive-by exploit". My malware gave me full access and control over your computer, meaning, I got access to all your accounts (see password above) and I can see everything on your screen, turn on your camera or microphone and you won't even notice about it. I collected all your private data and I RECORDED YOU (through your webcam) SATISFYING YOURSELF! After that I removed my malware to not leave any traces. I can send the video to all your contacts, post it on social network, publish it on the whole web, including the darknet, where the sick people are, I can publish all I found on your computer everywhere! Only you can prevent me from doing this and only I can help you out in this situation. Transfer exactly 1400$ with the current bitcoin (BTC) price to my bitcoin address. It's a very good offer, compared to all that horrible ###### that will happen if I publish everything. You can easily buy bitcoin here: www.paxful.com , www.coingate.com , www.coinbase.com , or check for bitcoin ATM near you, or Google for other exchanger. You can send the bitcoin directly to my address, or create your own wallet first here: www.login.blockchain.com/en/#/signup/ , then receive and send to mine. My bitcoin address is: 14qd4cN3HZ2ErMddV6QmWvE7mVUcGSBh1X Copy and paste my address, it's (cAsE-sEnSEtiVE) I give you 2 days time to transfer the bitcoin. As I got access to this email account, I will know if this email has already been read. If you get this email multiple times, it's to make sure that you read it, my mailer script is configured like this and after payment you can ignore it. After receiving the payment, I will remove everything and you can life your live in peace like before. Next time update your browser before browsing the web. Mail-Client-ID: 4483923502
  12. You sure the cables you were using supported PD spec and were powered by at least 60w? If not, it won’t charge. I'm sure, it works with other laptops just fine. Btw. if the cable or any other component supported less than 60W, it should still charge, just slower. But these Dells explicitly state in a notification that they REFUSE to charge because they don't recognize the cable as a Dell recommended one. Ridiculous.
  13. devnulllore

    Could this be malware?

    Ok, give me a little while and I will post the email.
  14. That nice big display and better speaker looks like it will make this a good replacement for my current alarm clock (google tablet).
  15. BudMan

    Could this be malware?

    What does what browser you used to create a website account have to do with the site being compromised? Use whatever browser you want that makes you happy.. You could of been using any browser, Doesn't matter how you got there or how you put the info into the sites db... Once the db has been compromised, if not properly secured by the site owner.. Then your info would be available to the people who gained access to the DB.. What the email said, and what is actually true are normally light years apart Post up this email - so we can see what it says... My guess its a cookie cutter spam/scam email that form filled in the info they got from whatever site was compromised. That had your info in it - any of the 30 of them it seems. Or it could of been from one that is not yet "known" to have been compromised.
  16. devnulllore

    Could this be malware?

    Because the email said I went to a compromised web site and that's how they got my info I don't know how it works and next time I should update my browser.
  17. BudMan

    Could this be malware?

    What does your browser have to do with a site being compromised and the sites incompetence at correctly securing their users passwords/info? Nothing you do or run on your end has anything to do with that... You could use a 120 character complex password, doesn't matter if the site stores it in the clear, or in a easy to reverse hash in their DB, and that DB is gotten by someone. The one thing you can do to help mitigate issues when that happens is use different passwords for each site. edit: Also the other thing you could do is enable 2FA.. So even of the info is compromised - they would also need to be able to do the 2FA.. That is not fullproof either, but it can help - depending on the MFA the site has enabled and how they have it implemented, etc.
  18. Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 7 review: Light, powerful, and beautiful by Rich Woods When people ask me what kind of ultrabook or convertible they should buy, my top answer is almost always something from the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 lineup. If you want a convertible, get the X1 Yoga, and if you want a thin and light clamshell, get the X1 Carbon. These are wonderful machines, with some of the best keyboards around, solid and consistent performance, and lovely Dolby Vision displays. This year's ThinkPad X1 Carbon makes some changes though, including for the Dolby Vision screen. Previously included with the 1440p option, Dolby Vision is offered on the 4K model, and this is also the first time there's been a 4K display on a 14-inch X1 laptop. There are also some design changes, with Lenovo offering the standard black model and a new carbon fiber weave variant. Luckily, Lenovo sent me both. Not only that, but one of them includes the 4K Dolby Vision display and the other includes the 1080p regular one. More on that in a bit. Specs CPU Intel Core i7-8565U (1.8GHz) Intel Core i7-8665U (1.9 GHz) GPU Intel UHD Graphics 620 Display 14.0” FHD (1920x1080) 400nit 14.0" UHD (3840x2160) 500nit VESA400 HDR with Dolby Vision Storage 512GB NVMe 1TB NVMe Memory 16GB (LPDDR3 2133MHz) Ports (2) Thunderbolt 3, Type-C (2) USB 3.1 Gen 1, Type-A (1) Ethernet Extension (1) HDMI (1) Microphone / Headphone combo jack Battery 51 watt-hour Li-ion, supports Rapid Charge Audio Dolby Atmos speaker system, 2W x 2, 0.8W x 2 Windows Hello Fingerprint sensor, IR camera (IR camera included on 4K model) Material Top: Carbon Fiber (optional Carbon Fiber Weave design on UHD panel) Bottom: Magnesium Alloy Color Black OS Windows 10 Pro Price $2,641 / $1,584.60 $3,659 / $1,999 The pricing listed above is the "full" price and the current sale price. I've never seen Lenovo ThinkPads listed at full price, as there are always sales going on, but the prices do fluctuate. There are a couple of things to note. There are four display options; the two not listed above are a 300-nit FHD touch panel and a 300-nit QHD non-touch panel. The QHD option is no longer offered with Dolby Vision. The difference in price between the Core i7-8565U and Core i7-8665U is $227, so vPro is significantly more expensive. In fact, the price for the Core i7-8565U and the vPro Core i5-8365U is the same. Day one Design The big change with this year's ThinkPad X1 Carbon is that it's thinner, lighter, and smaller. Yes, it comes in a smaller footprint now, and it weighs in at just 2.4 pounds. If you're looking for thin and light without compromising on power, this is it. In fact, the weight is what you're going for here. Traditionally, the X1 Carbon and the X1 Yoga are two very similar machines, but the X1 Yoga offers the additional functionality that's offered with a convertible. The benefit to the clamshell X1 Carbon is its weight. And I have to say, at 2.4 pounds, it feels great. It's easy to pick up with one hand, and it's comfortable to carry in a bag. Other design changes include the new carbon fiber weave, which is only offered for the 4K Dolby Vision model. In fact, you don't get a choice. If you go 4K, you get carbon fiber weave; if you get anything else, you get regular carbon fiber black. The carbon fiber weave is a nice touch, and while it looks textured, it's smooth. On the top-left portion of the lid, there's the glossy black ThinkPad logo that debuted with last year's model. On the bottom-right, there's the new X1 logo that was also born last year, replacing the Lenovo logo. Both of these logos are exclusive to premium ThinkPads; specifically, the P1 also has the black ThinkPad logo, but only X1 models have the X1. As the name implies, most of the device is made out of carbon fiber, while the bottom is a magnesium alloy, both of which are light materials (we'll talk about heavier materials in a couple of weeks when I review the now-all-aluminum ThinkPad X1 Yoga). I really like the feel of carbon fiber. It's smooth and cool to the touch, but it's also strong and light. As far as ports go, there are plenty to choose from. After all, this is a business laptop so Lenovo can't take away the USB Type-A ports just yet. On the left side, there are two Thunderbolt 3 ports - one of which supports mechanical docking - one USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-A port, HDMI 1.4b, Ethernet extension, and a 3.5mm combo audio jack. On the right side, you'll find another USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-A port, and also the power button. This is the first time that the power button has been placed on the side of a ThinkPad clamshell; usually, this placement is reserved for convertibles while clamshells have it on the keyboard. On the bottom of the device, you'll find two Dolby Atmos speakers (as well as two above the keyboard). That bottom panel can be removed with five Philips-head screws. That will give you access to the internals, and Lenovo provides documentation on swapping out things like the SSD, battery, and more. As is the case with all ThinkPads, the X1 Carbon is tested against 12 MIL-STD-810G tests, so it can handle extreme temperatures, shocks, vibration, dust, and more. Display and audio As I mentioned above, there are four display options: FHD, FHD with touch, QHD, and UHD with Dolby Vision. I was sent the FHD and UHD models. Obviously, the UHD panel is prettier with its vibrant Dolby Vision colors. The FHD one is a matte anti-glare screen, and while it does look nice with accurate color representation, it's not as vibrant as the Dolby Vision one, or as clear as a 4K screen. What you do get with the FHD model is better performance and battery life. A UHD display has about 8.3 million pixels, while FHD is only about 2.1 million pixels. That's a big difference in the amount of power needed for these displays. That's why I was always a fan of the QHD (3.7 million pixels) model. In my opinion, you really can't see the difference between 1440p and 2160p on at 14-inch screen. I feel like only including Dolby Vision on the 2160p variant was a mistake here, since it's sucking down more power without any meaningful benefit. But the screen is absolutely beautiful. The non-Dolby Vision models are probably more accurate, since the Dolby Vision screens tend to make things so vibrant that they appear oversaturated. Pretty is the word I'd go with. Audio quality is fantastic, something that I'm really pleased with. Two years ago, that was a real problem on ThinkPads, and I'm really happy to see Lenovo making that a priority. The ThinkPad X1 Carbon includes two 0.8W tweeters above the keyboard and two 2W woofers underneath it. They all combine for audio that's both loud and clear. Listening to music while you're working on this PC is a great experience. The bezels around the screen have been shrunken down with this generation, with a slightly larger bezel on top for the webcam and IR camera. It also has a larger chin, which serves to prop up the screen a bit. Keyboard and trackpad As usual, the keyboard on the ThinkPad X1 Carbon is best-in-class. ThinkPads are famous for their keyboards, and for good reason. They're the Cadillac of keyboards. Comfortable, accurate, and responsive, I never have any problems with it. The keyboard has a deeper key-press than most modern ultrabooks, although you'll find one that's slightly shallower on the X1 Yoga. The resistance in the keys feels good though, and that's what's important. In general, you want more resistance on a shallower keyboard and less resistance while not feeling lose on a deeper keyboard. Lenovo gets it just right, and the keys aren't wobbly. As usual, there's a trackpad below the keyboard that has physical buttons above it. Those physical buttons can be used with the TrackPoint, which is located between the G, H, and B keys. I actually like to use the trackpad with the physical buttons, as they're great for drag-and-drop operations. The trackpad itself is somewhat small compared with other laptops, and that's mainly due to those physical buttons. If you want a really large trackpad, this isn't it. I have to say though, I wouldn't want to give up those buttons. Few laptops have them, but I love them. There's also a fingerprint sensor to the right of the trackpad, which is pretty standard for ThinkPads these days. After all, ThinkPads have had fingerprint sensors long before Windows Hello was a thing. Performance and battery life While both of the ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 7 models that Lenovo sent me include 16GB RAM, the 1080p one comes with a Core i7-8565U and the 4K one comes with a Core i7-8665U. Both chips are from the Whiskey Lake family, 15W CPUs with four cores and eight threads. The only difference is that the Core i7-8665U is the vPro model. As you'd expect from a laptop like this, it comes with integrated graphics. I have to say, I saw some pretty big differences between the two PCs in terms of both performance and battery life. The FHD model excelled in pretty much every area, while the 4K one struggled at times, especially for battery life. All of this will come across in the benchmark scores. In general productivity use cases, both machines do great. My work mostly gets done in the browser. I did bring the 4K model with me to China for a week (that's Shenzhen in the background of the pictures), and since I had to use an unreliable VPN to access the internet while I was there, articles were written in Microsoft Word. But usually, I have a dozen or so tabs open in Chrome, with other apps like OneNote, Skype, Slack, and Microsoft To-Do open. In these scenarios, both units do great. It was when I started to try video and photo editing on these that the difference in performance between the two devices became apparent. I'm not saying that the 4K model was showing poor performance - it wasn't - but if you put the two models side-by-side, you'll see it. Battery life is also notably different in the two models, and that's one of the key reasons that Lenovo sent me both of them. On the UHD model, I got around four hours streaming Stranger Things (4K) on Netflix, and about five hours streaming Colony (FHD). On the FHD model, I got over 10 hours with both, although Stranger Things should stream in FHD on an FHD machine. For benchmarks, I used PCMark 8 and PCMark 10. First up is PCMark 8, which provides three tests: Home, Creative, and Work. The Home test checks common tasks like casual gaming, video chat, and more. FHD UHD As you can see, there's a significant difference between the two scores. The FHD one is about where I'd expect it to be. Next up is the Creative test, which checks more GPU-intensive tasks like video editing, mainstream gaming, and more. FHD UHD In the Creative test, the difference between the two isn't as significant, although the FHD model still performs better. Finally, the Work test checks productivity-related tasks like writing and spreadsheets. FHD UHD Again, the FHD model is the one that performs as I'd expect a machine with these specs to perform. I also ran the all-in-one test in PCMark 10 for those that like to keep score. FHD UHD Conclusion I almost feel like there's no much I can say about the ThinkPad X1 Carbon, because it's so good, but it's always been good. When talking about a business clamshell that's thin and light, look no further. And it's even lighter this year at an incredible 2.4 pounds. My biggest issue is that Lenovo went and decided to put the good screen in a 4K model. I don't believe 4K is necessary on a 14-inch 16:9 display, and it's sucking down battery life. Two years ago, we had a QHD OLED option. Last year, they ditched OLED to everyone's disappointment and gave us QHD Dolby Vision. Now, it's just UHD Dolby Vision and QHD non-Dolby Vision. So which one would I tell you to get? I'm really not sure. On one hand, you get the best battery life and performance from the 1080p model, but the prettiest display from the UHD model. Honestly, the QHD variant is probably the best balance between screen resolution, battery life, and performance. Of course, that's why I've always praised Lenovo for using QHD at the premium end rather than doing what HP does, which is to provide only 1080p and 4K options. Disregarding the screen options that Lenovo provided this year, the X1 Carbon is once again the best at what it does. It has a phenomenal keyboard, and it fits in an even smaller footprint. It's one of the most pleasant laptops to use that there is. Honestly, the fact that Lenovo is selling the top-end model right now for $1,999 is a great deal. You might want to check it out.
  19. devnulllore

    Could this be malware?

    Ok well now I am just concerned about the browser I use. I use the latest version of chrome. How safe is Chrome in these circumstances?
  20. I love new technology. I have heard of this device and would like to win it to try out.
  21. This Complete .NET & C# Developer Certification Bundle is now 98% off by Steven Parker Today's highlighted deal comes via our Online Courses section of the Neowin Deals store, where for only a limited time you can save 98% off the Complete .NET & C# Developer Certification Bundle. A comprehensive, 58-hour guide to becoming a professional-quality software developer. What's the deal? This bundle contains the following courses: Software Architecture: Meta & SOLID Principles in C# Develop Software Systems Applying Design Patterns Based on Meta & SOLID Principles Learn Unit Testing with NUnit and C# Learn Unit Testing, TDD, Mocking & Dependency Injection Software Architecture: Dependency Injection for C# Developers Learn Dependency Injection Techniques TDD in C# From A to Z Learn Test-Driven Development & Improve You Unit Testing Skills Software Architecture: Functional Programming in C# Learn the Principles of Functional Programming Apply Them to Improve Software Architecture Master the Art of Writing Clean Code in C# Learn How to Write Clean & Maintainable Code in C# C# in Depth: Puzzles, Gotchas, Questions at Interviews Discover C# Tips & Interview Traps Complete Practical LINQ Tutorial for C# Developers Cover All Things LINQ Automate Applications with SpecFlow and Selenium WebDriver in C# Cover Behavior-Driven Development with SpecFlow & Selenium WebDriver with C# Algorithms & Data Structures in C#: Complete Tutorial Learn Data Structures & Algorithms in C# from A to Z Good to know Length of time users can access courses: Lifetime Certification of completion included Redemption deadline: redeem your code within 30 days of purchase For full details, terms, and instructor info for the above courses, click here. What's the benefit? This save 98% off the Complete .NET & C# Developer Certification Bundle normally costs $2,000, but you can pick it up for just $31 for a limited time, that's a saving of 98% ($1,969) off the normal price! >> Get this deal, or learn more about it here << See all discounted Online Courses on offer. This is a time-limited deal. Save even more! Stick with Neowin Deals and earn credit or even deeper discounts. Check out our recent deals here or on the Neowin Deals site. For every $25 spent, you get $1 credit added to your Neowin Deals account. Refer the deal for $10 credit via social media or email and if it results in a purchase of at least $10, you'll get $10 credit added to your account. 10% off for first-time buyers: be sure not to dismiss the popup offer to subscribe to email updates on the deals page in order to profit! Not for you? If this offer doesn't interest you, why not check out our giveaways on the Neowin Deals website? There's also a bunch of freebies you can check out here. On the Neowin Deals website why not enter our GIVEAWAY to be in the draw to win a Samsung 65" QLED Q70 Series Ultra HD 4K Smart TV! #giveaway #samsung #free https://t.co/mUiXCLDeTZ pic.twitter.com/wby5sU7biB — Neowin (@NeowinFeed) August 1, 2019 Miscellany and the fine print! In some cases, such as with Online Courses, a store credit refund within 15 days of purchase is possible if you are unhappy with it; this does not apply to all deals, so please do check the terms on the page before making a purchase. Check our other recent deals, before they expire, or our preferred partner software for Private Internet Access and NordVPN deals. How can I disable these posts? Click here. Disclosure: This is a StackCommerce deal or giveaway in partnership with Neowin; an account at StackCommerce is required to participate in any deals or giveaways. For a full description of StackCommerce's privacy guidelines, go here. Neowin benefits from shared revenue of each sale made through our branded deals site, and it all goes toward the running costs. *Values or percentages mentioned above are subject to StackCommerce's own determination of retail pricing.
  22. BudMan

    Could this be malware?

    So exactly - when I look at my email on the pwnd site.. its listed in 6.. one being Adobe, back in 2013 Adobe: In October 2013, 153 million Adobe accounts were breached with each containing an internal ID, username, email, encrypted password and a password hint in plain text. The password cryptography was poorly done and many were quickly resolved back to plain text. will just list the text vs screenshot, since there might be an issue with screenshots currently? Anywhoo you see that adobe had problem back in 2013, my email address was listed in there. My ISP has nothing to do with Adobe's lack of security.. Same goes with your ISP and the sites you have accounts on that have been compromised.. And sure they might suggest you use password site or software xyz.. Your free to do that if you wish.. Use of password site/software will allow you to use different passwords for each site much easier then you doing it yourself... Nobody can remember complex passwords, especially once you start using different ones on each and every site you have accounts on.. I am guessing you have way more than 30 If all your sites use different passwords - even if one compromised they only gain access to that site account, and not all of yours since your using different passwords on each site.
  23. LostCat

    Control

    I hope they have a better engine on PC than Quantum Break. I can't even play that smoothly with a Ryzen 2600X and a 5700 XT, so far o.o Might as well just keep that game to my X1X.
  24. Jim K

    Could this be malware?

    No..your service provider can't do anything about it. Just be sure your passwords are changed (especially if that email you received contained current password(s) or if the compromised sites revealed currently used password(s)). Just might be time to go through all your logins and update.
  25. BudMan

    Could this be malware?

    What does your isp have to do with sites you visit having being compromised?
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