A sad farewell to the 60 Watt bulb


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speedstr3789

I think you're thinking of cfl's. Which have mercury and some other stuff, but theyre minor amounts that won't affect anything, at least not on the new models, there are even some without mercury.

That's what this is all about. cfl's

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Rohdekill

No, the US is not. The republicans voted against it. Bring on the Tea Party idiots and that's what you get.

You mean this law, passed in 2007? LINK

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linsook

I think you're thinking of cfl's. Which have mercury and some other stuff, but theyre minor amounts that won't affect anything, at least not on the new models, there are even some without mercury.

Pored quality LED, meaning less light per watt and inconsistent quality. But primarily they have poor drivers, causing them. To burn but really quickly.

You're also ignoring basic international economics. Evert ing costs a lot more in the west, but if you where to compare us price relative to Us wages and then Chinese price relative to Chinese wages, you'd see that the prices aren't that far off.

You can't talk about the quality if you have no experience with them. Can't just write it off because its made in China, thats naive these days. Poor drivers? Right, a circuit board with a couple of caps, resistors and diodes is crappy cause its made in China.

I wasn't comparing relative costs, I was comparing the costs to us. We could buy them for the fraction of the price that philips tries to rip you off for, simple as that.

edit: I think we can agree on one thing, that LED's are the future. But the bottom line I was getting at is that the prices they are being sold at is too high. Eventually the prices will come down when the chinese made stuff gets sold here, i'm not sure when or what legal hurdles they have but it will happen. And for those who want to give them a test run, you can buy some China made stuff for 11 bucks off ebay, which is still pricy from my experience. But for 11 bucks, you can't go wrong.

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HawkMan

Yeah well, to bad you where replying to a post specifically about LEDs then...

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Glen

On a related note though, this news also means an end to the classic versions of the Easy Bake Oven.

I used to have a popcorn popper when I was a kid that used a 100W bulb and that says a lot about the heat being thrown from those.

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HawkMan

You can't talk about the quality if you have no experience with them. Can't just write it off because its made in China, thats naive these days. Poor drivers? Right, a circuit board with a couple of caps, resistors and diodes is crappy cause its made in China.

I wasn't comparing relative costs, I was comparing the costs to us. We could buy them for the fraction of the price that philips tries to rip you off for, simple as that.

I'm not writing it off because it's made in china the quality philips ones are probably made there to. However its a known fact hat stuff made in china for china does not follow western quality standards or safety standards in regards to todos materials. There is a reason why they are cheap. If philips could sell theirs at that price, they would.

Also you have to compare relative costs, and you're ignoring other costs involved in imports as well. You can't just import them. They need to be certified and tested and shown to not contain toxic chemicals. And I've seen the cheap LEDs over here, they are crap. They're light output is bad, the ought color is horrible and the drivers burn out really fast due to inadequate components and heat dissipation.

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Southern Patriot

No, the US is not. The republicans voted against it. Bring on the Tea Party idiots and that's what you get.

Actually, the bill that was introduced to repeal the light bulb ban failed to pass.

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Southern Patriot

You mean this law, passed in 2007? LINK

I think he was talking about HR 2417, which failed to pass. It would have repealed certain parts of that law, specifically dealing with the light bulb ban. There are also a few other bills that have been introduced to limit the scope of the ban, but so far none of them have passed.

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Fred Derf

Since, CFLs and mercury has been mentioned in this thread, I should point out that the mercury content and disposal is only a problem if you break the bulb before the end of its natural life (and particularly if you break a new bulb while installing it). The mercury content is measured to coincide with its natural life so that there should be no mercury remaining when the bulb wears out naturally. The thing to remember is to screw in a CFL from the ballast rather than touching the glass with your fingers.

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speedstr3789

Since, CFLs and mercury has been mentioned in this thread, I should point out that the mercury content and disposal is only a problem if you break the bulb before the end of its natural life (and particularly if you break a new bulb while installing it).

So basically the statistic for breaking a bulb during it's natural life or after are 50/50. Great odds.

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Mystic Mungis

Farewell old friend :(

LED lighting is so much better IMO but banning them does seem a little harsh though

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HawkMan

So basically the statistic for breaking a bulb during it's natural life or after are 50/50. Great odds.

Since when did Hal of the bulbs break ?

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PyX

The 5 milligrams of mercury is burned up over its 7 year life. Compared to the amount of mercury in home thermometers, this is a minuscule amount.

Even if it is burnt up, the question is still legitimate.

If you have Hg, no matter if you have C, O, H and whatever else to help it burn, the Hg won?t go away. This kind of reaction (becoming something else) happens only in nuclear plants and on stars (like the sun) AFAIK.

Not saying that you are wrong, but like Hum I want to understand. I know it has to do with half lives, but I am too rusty with my chemistry to actually understand biggrin.gif

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Detection

First thing I do when I move house is swap all the normal bulbs for energy saving ones

Brightness is not the same but you get used to it and better for your pocket in the long run

Just found myself a huge Energy Saving bulb for my living room, 30w = 117w - 1700 lumens, cost me nearly ?4 for one bulb but feels like I have a normal bulb in here now, much brighter and less than 40 seconds for 60% of lumens to warm up

As technology improves we`ll see much better energy saving bulbs, but I`m happy with this for now

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Mordkanin

Halogen lights can be made to make either a lot of light or a little light and a lot of heat. Halogens also get hotter than regular incandescent, but they're still ore efficient, not by much though, it's all down to the frequencies they radiate heat and light in.

Halogen lamps are just incandescents run at a higher temperature (Making them more efficient). The 'halogen' part of the name comes from the tiny amount of a halogen they stick in it so that the filament can regenerate, rather than burning out in a couple seconds from the higher operating temperature.

The mercury content is measured to coincide with its natural life so that there should be no mercury remaining when the bulb wears out naturally

That's not true.

The mercury content is dosed to provide the correct operational voltage and luminous output of the fluorescent light. (Too much Hg, lamp voltage goes up. Harder to start.)

Over the life of the lamp, it is absorbed into other materials in the lamp: Very little, if any of it leaves the lamp. It's all just stuck in the phosphor, the glass, the electrode and the sputtered off emix.

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HawkMan

So, there are still different kind of halogen bulbs. We had a outdoor heating lamp at the store 1500watt halogen uses, lots of heat but barely glowing.

Halogen is crap though, though them with a bare finger and they'll burn out really quicky, tiny vibrations make them burn out, and they're annoyingly hot to use as working/ desk lamps

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Mordkanin
though them with a bare finger and they'll burn out really quicky,

Quartz devitrification. Skin oil + massive heat leads to the quartz crystallizing, and losing strength in that area.

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123456789A

I was skeptical when i moved from incandescent bulb to compact fluorescent but i do not regret it. From my own experience compact fluorescent last a lot longer than long life branded incandescent bulb. I love not needing to change them every month.

Wow, what kind of abuse were you putting your bulbs through that you had to replace them every month?

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Andre S.

I don't know about LED, but CFL gives poor color rendering. And for good reason, since they only emit a few narrow ranges of the spectrum rather than the near-full spectrum incandescents provide. You can tell, for example, that an object has roughly the same apparent color in daylight than under an incandescent; however under CFL, it looks quite different, especially in the shades of blue.

For this reason I only use CFL where I don't spend a lot of time: garage, outdoor, closets, etc.

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HawkMan

Quartz devitrification. Skin oil + massive heat leads to the quartz crystallizing, and losing strength in that area.

Yes. Know it's the skin oil, my po t was just that the things are damn fragile, while just 10-30% more effective than regular bulbs, and I don't believe the ones that say 30%

I don't know about LED, but CFL gives poor color rendering. And for good reason, since they only emit a few narrow ranges of the spectrum rather than the near-full spectrum incandescents provide. You can tell, for example, that an object has roughly the same apparent color in daylight than under an incandescent; however under CFL, it looks quite different, especially in the shades of blue.

For this reason I only use CFL where I don't spend a lot of time: garage, outdoor, closets, etc.

That's not how it works...

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DrakeN2k

So basically the statistic for breaking a bulb during it's natural life or after are 50/50. Great odds.

wow logic fail , some foods have more mercury.

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HawkMan
CRI is not a good indicator for use in visual assessment
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