[Thanks for help, I have finalized one]I want to try Linux.....


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Soulsiphon

Wow! When did Mr. Nice came to the town? laugh.gif

Barney was right. You asked a straight up question and deserved a straight up answer. :D I look forward to any updates. Best of luck!

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Barney T.

Barney was right. You asked a straight up question and deserved a straight up answer. :D I look forward to any updates. Best of luck!

Thank you! (Y)

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FMH

Hi everybody,

Thanks again for replies. Currently I'm going through all 'video reviews' of all names you have told me, on YouTube. Looks very interesting.

But I have one more question(and it could be a very silly question, since I don't know much about Linuxsmile.gif). Like Android has a version which is on Nexus phones, that could be called a pure Android experience. But OEMs put skins, and several tweaks on it, to make different iterations of Android, such as Sense UI, Stage UI and Touchwiz UI.

So my question is this: Is there something like a 'pure' Linux experience, made my Linus Trovald or Linux Foundation? And if there is, what is it called?

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articuno1au

While I agree with mint, perhaps take a look at Ubuntu.

They have Wubi, which allows you to install Linux like an application in Windows, then boot into it without have to worry about partitions etc etc.

Certainly the easiest way to start off :)

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Gerowen

If you're not a developer OP, why worry about Linux? Really, nobody but developers use it. Stick with Windows or Mac OS where the rest of the planet is.

I've been using Linux on all of my personal computers for years and I am not a "developer". Sure I write my own little scripts and programs from time to time when I can't find a good solution already out there, but I'm a general user just like everybody else. My wife runs it on the desktop, our home server runs it, my laptop runs it, and I've installed it on several machines for customers who no longer have their Windows restore CDs and don't want to pay for replacements. Not a single one of them have complained, and several have actually called me to thank me for them not having any problems after replacing Windows.

Your statement is untrue and unfounded.

To the original poster, I haven't used it extensively, but I would recommend Linux Mint. The UI change in the latest version of Ubuntu is, in my opinion, absolutely horrible, and lost a lot of users for Canonical. Some Ubuntu users will tell you just to use Gnome2, but even doing that, Ubuntu 11.04 just felt REALLY slow compared to previous releases. That combined with them doing a new release every 6 months was just too much. I moved to Debian, but Linux Mint looks pretty, user friendly, and Ubuntu-ish, but without Unity. The bar being at the bottom can be changed, it's just the default state of Gnome for Linux Mint.

If you're interested though, I've had really good experiences with Debian and run it on all of my machines exclusively. The only thing I've noticed that makes it less user friendly than Ubuntu is the following:

1) There is no "Hardware Drivers" thingy that pops up and asks if you want to install proprietary drivers. You just have to hunt them down and install and configure them yourself.

2) The default theme is kinda fugly. I mean it's not terrible, but it's REALLY old school. It's very easy to customize though because it's just Gnome, like dozens of other distributions. Attached is a screenshot of my setup right now.

You can learn more about it at www.debian.org .

post-125978-0-47344400-1315813314.png

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TEX4S

Do you think this is a little novelty that will wear off after a month or so - or are you, for some reason, looking for an OS replacement ?

Me personally, I have mint11 installed as a VM on my ThinkPad and my desktop - and I cant say Ive opened either one of them in a month.

Many nix users always say "well if you have an old computer.. blah blah blah" - well, my oldest computer has 8GB RAM and a C2D w/ 120GB Inferno SSD (laptop) - so that argument doesnt work for me.

In fact the whole linux experience for me quickly withered away as soon as my idiot summertime intern started working for me. He was anti-MS, and pro linux 100% - and had some of the most BS stereotypes of Windows Ive ever heard - and its the sort of fodder they toss around when they are coddling themselves about out free is good, and polished sucks - stick it to the man montra. That asshat would waste an hour to create something in Linux that would have taken 5 minutes to do in Windows - and couldnt understand why companies care about that sort of thing....

Then again, he was going to Texas A&M ... stupid aggie.

END OF RANT

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Gerowen

Do you think this is a little novelty that will wear off after a month or so - or are you, for some reason, looking for an OS replacement ?

Me personally, I have mint11 installed as a VM on my ThinkPad and my desktop - and I cant say Ive opened either one of them in a month.

Many nix users always say "well if you have an old computer.. blah blah blah" - well, my oldest computer has 8GB RAM and a C2D w/ 120GB Inferno SSD (laptop) - so that argument doesnt work for me.

In fact the whole linux experience for me quickly withered away as soon as my idiot summertime intern started working for me. He was anti-MS, and pro linux 100% - and had some of the most BS stereotypes of Windows Ive ever heard - and its the sort of fodder they toss around when they are coddling themselves about out free is good, and polished sucks - stick it to the man montra. That asshat would waste an hour to create something in Linux that would have taken 5 minutes to do in Windows - and couldnt understand why companies care about that sort of thing....

Then again, he was going to Texas A&M ... stupid aggie.

END OF RANT

I've met Windows users that were just as bad, but on the other side of the fence. Not saying you don't have a valid argument, but I hope your experience with that guy hasn't spoiled you completely on the Linux community. A lot of the little programs I write to make life easier (I do most of them in Python) I also compile for Windows so I can use them across both platforms without installing additional software since everything at work is Windows based. The key to success in this market is cross platform compatibility. If you make something in Windows, I should be able to receive and view that information as it is intended on a computer running any other major operating system. Standards is what will end this whole "Windows vs OSX vs Linux" war.

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articuno1au

I whole heartedly agree with you there.

I do however think there are more Mac and Linux "nazis". Not to say Windows there aren't Windows equivalents, just it seems the Linux and Mac ones are more vehement in there beliefs..

2 things:

1. Eww @ Python D:

2. Linux is great, it just suffers from fragmentation and a lack of development/uptake.

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FMH

Can somebody please answer my question on page 2. :)

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articuno1au

Hi everybody,

Thanks again for replies. Currently I'm going through all 'video reviews' of all names you have told me, on YouTube. Looks very interesting.

But I have one more question(and it could be a very silly question, since I don't know much about Linuxsmile.gif). Like Android has a version which is on Nexus phones, that could be called a pure Android experience. But OEMs put skins, and several tweaks on it, to make different iterations of Android, such as Sense UI, Stage UI and Touchwiz UI.

So my question is this: Is there something like a 'pure' Linux experience, made my Linus Trovald or Linux Foundation? And if there is, what is it called?

Not per se.

Linux' history is long and interleaved. There is Linux, a command line kernel. Following this there are: Gnome Desktop Environment (Gnome or GDE) and K Desktop Environment (KDE) which are the two "primary" GUIs available.

Following this there are Unity (Ubuntu only), LXDE and KFCE; the other "serious" desktop environments.

This is both Linux' greatest strength and weakness. Being able to easily change desktop environments (and through it apps and usage styles) means you can customize to your hearts content.

This also kinda sucks. As you move from Distro to Distro, you will find different environments and usage styles. Also, applications available for Gnome cannot always be used on KDE.

tl;dr - Gnome and or KDE would be the most "Linuxy" ones :)

EDIT::

Worth a read perhaps: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desktop_environment

From there you can get to all the serious desktop environments you might want to read about :)

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FMH

Not per se.

Linux' history is long and interleaved. There is Linux, a command line kernel. Following this there are: Gnome Desktop Environment (Gnome or GDE) and K Desktop Environment (KDE) which are the two "primary" GUIs available.

Following this there are Unity (Ubuntu only), LXDE and KFCE; the other "serious" desktop environments.

This is both Linux' greatest strength and weakness. Being able to easily change desktop environments (and through it apps and usage styles) means you can customize to your hearts content.

This also kinda sucks. As you move from Distro to Distro, you will find different environments and usage styles. Also, applications available for Gnome cannot always be used on KDE.

tl;dr - Gnome and or KDE would be the most "Linuxy" ones :)

EDIT::

Worth a read perhaps: http://en.wikipedia....top_environment

From there you can get to all the serious desktop environments you might want to read about :)

Thanks.

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Gerowen

1. Eww @ Python D:

Like I said in my earlier post, not an expert. Python is just something I fell into in college that was easy for me to understand, :p

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articuno1au

Yeah, I'm no expert either, I just hate Python :p

EWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW

I'd rather code in VBS D:

Like the Mac v Windows thing: If it works for you :p+

@ FMH - You're welcome :)

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FMH

Do you think this is a little novelty that will wear off after a month or so - or are you, for some reason, looking for an OS replacement ?

Me personally, I have mint11 installed as a VM on my ThinkPad and my desktop - and I cant say Ive opened either one of them in a month.

- - - -

END OF RANT

No.... I have downloaded all sorts of browsers and productivity suites and loads of other stuff, just to try and experience something new.

And it looks like permanent since I have downloaded lots of stuff for almost 2 years now. Just getting into OS. :)

Plus, I also try a LOT of something very unrelated stuff: several types of teas, coffees and other foods. :p

END OF DEFENCE :laugh:

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sanctified

I recommend Elementary for the same reasons people recommend Mint. The difference is Elementary is actually the only distro I know with a clear goal in GUI and Linux redefinition:

the-desktop.png

Some links that elaborate some of the Elementary's developers concerns about Linux distros (This is what sold Elementary to me):

http://elementaryos.org/journal/distros-platforms-and-where-we-fit

http://elementaryos.org/journal/managing-criticism-both-ends

Edit: Also, Elementary sports a range of in-house coded apps that are available for all linux distros but made specially for elementary, all of the based on Elementary's philosophy: Speed, simplicity and GUI standarization across the distro. All thanks to Vala.

http://live.gnome.org/Vala

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Xilo

I'm VERY interested in designing. And the thing that matters to me most is UI and UX. That, to me is the most important thing in a program.

Designing and Linux don't belong in the same sentence.

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Tekkerson

FMH, I don't know why anyone isn't recommending Ubuntu. AFAIK The general consensus is that, that is the most popular distribution for Linux desktops. IMO It's the easiest Linux distribution to get around, plus I love the Unity workspace, don't know why people prefer Windows 95/98-ish OS menus.

I also don't get the Unity hate, but I personally love it. The dock is useful, it's sort of like the windows super bar and mac OSX dock. From my experience, take what they say here with a grain of salt, I recommend you try it and see for yourself.

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FMH

Designing and Linux don't belong in the same sentence.

laugh.gif But trying lots of new designs and interfaces do.

FMH, I don't know why anyone isn't recommending Ubuntu. AFAIK The general consensus is that, that is the most popular distribution for Linux desktops. IMO It's the easiest Linux distribution to get around, plus I love the Unity workspace, don't know why people prefer Windows 95/98-ish OS menus.

I also don't get the Unity hate, but I personally love it. The dock is useful, it's sort of like the windows super bar and mac OSX dock. From my experience, take what they say here with a grain of salt, I recommend you try it and see for yourself.

Hey yeah, I saw a YouTube video, certainly looks interesting.

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sanctified

Designing and Linux don't belong in the same sentence.

Why not? Just because some useless cliches? I know, firsthand, editorial houses that design in Linux, the same with many illustrators.

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LaP

I whole heartedly agree with you there.

I do however think there are more Mac and Linux "nazis". Not to say Windows there aren't Windows equivalents, just it seems the Linux and Mac ones are more vehement in there beliefs..

2 things:

1. Eww @ Python D:

2. Linux is great, it just suffers from fragmentation and a lack of development/uptake.

Linux has some very good free apps though. Specially in the vector, diagram and flowchart drawing field. For people on a budget and who do not want to pirate apps it's not a bad idea to have a linux distro around.

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Xilo

Why not? Just because some useless cliches? I know, firsthand, editorial houses that design in Linux, the same with many illustrators.

Apart from visual fx, Linux is pretty subpar for designing work.

The apps are pretty much trash compared to the Mac/Windows counterparts.

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Max Norris
The apps are pretty much trash compared to the Mac/Windows counterparts.

Some of them aren't half bad though, although I agree there are some stinkers in there too.. that's nothing unique to Linux though, there's some awful freebies for every OS. Most of the more notable applications are available for most other operating systems though, so it's hard to pick one particular OS just because of free software.

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sanctified

Apart from visual fx, Linux is pretty subpar for designing work.

The apps are pretty much trash compared to the Mac/Windows counterparts.

Not trash, just not as robust I agree, however not everyone need the latest, greatest with the biggest featureset.

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LaP

Apart from visual fx, Linux is pretty subpar for designing work.

The apps are pretty much trash compared to the Mac/Windows counterparts.

Xara Xtreme is a very good app.

Not trash, just not as robust I agree, however not everyone need the latest, greatest with the biggest featureset.

Robust comes with a price. Illustrator and Photoshop are awesome but unless they are the tools used to pay for the bills i don't see how anyone can justify paying that much. Yes there's inkscape on windows but dunno i just prefer to use Linux apps on a Linux desktop but it's probably just me though.

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Xilo

Not trash, just not as robust I agree, however not everyone need the latest, greatest with the biggest featureset.

It's not just the feature set, it's also the UI.

For instance, GIMP is such a pain to use because the UI sucks compared to something like Photoshop.

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