With the recent updates, are you likely to jump ship?


Are you planning on buying a Windows Phone soon?  

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George P

When they give competitive apps. I mean £2.29 for the majority of 69p iOS games that are still cheaper on Android. So what if they have XBOX Live, Game Centre on iOS4/5 is free. I don't care about achievements, I just want to play games when bored and not pay ridiculous amounts for them.

So staying with Android here.

Xbox Live on the phone is free and if you don't care about achievements then don't look at Xbox Live games, there are lots of free and lower priced games without Xbox Live support. It's like you haven't even actually looked at what the platform has to offer.

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Geoffrey B.

still not likely to switch to Windows Phone 7

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Order_66

For every positive thing I read about WP7 I read three negative things, the OS looks nice and I don't mind the tiles but there's really no point in me leaving android, at least not for a while.

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Muhammad Farrukh

Yes.

Absolutely.

Mango > Rest of the world

I'm totally buying it

*SIGH*

As soon as I get the money.

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TheLegendOfMart

My android phone died on me recently, so i decided to pick up a HTC HD7 refurb, took me an hour to do OS updates to get Mango on.

The phone is really responsive flicking around the OS but it looks a bit plain for me, just wish the tiles were a bit smaller.

Also why the hell is Angry Birds £2.29 when its free on Android, it doesnt even have all the levels that Android/IOS has, there is no Angry Birds Rio either.

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SharpGreen

Nope. While I love the overall design of WP7 (and by extension W8) I hate how locked down it is. I'd miss the openness I have with my Android phone.

My next phone is a Galaxy Nexus :D (Hopefully)

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Asharae

I have the iPhone 3GS atm and I must say I am really really really interested in WP7.

I just don't like the prospect of losing all the apps I paid for on iOS :/

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Muhammad Farrukh

I have the iPhone 3GS atm and I must say I am really really really interested in WP7.

I just don't like the prospect of losing all the apps I paid for on iOS :/

Its app number is increasing at a rate faster than any other platform' including iOS

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TheLegendOfMart

Yeah but hes already paid for all the IOS apps which means he will have to pay again just to get equivalent ones on WP7.

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Muhammad Farrukh

Yeah but hes already paid for all the IOS apps which means he will have to pay again just to get equivalent ones on WP7.

True.

I was just stating the fact that if he jumps to WP7, it won't be the lack of apps that'll, possibly, bug him.

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George P

Yeah but hes already paid for all the IOS apps which means he will have to pay again just to get equivalent ones on WP7.

That's something that happens regardless of platform, if you've been on one for years. The thing is how many apps do you really need though? Lots of people get lots of apps only to use them for a bit and then they just sit there.

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bobbyfabulous

Not a chance. All the devices I've seen are way under spec'd (why pay for last years tech?), the UI is ugly and I really don't think the platform will ever catch on with the general masses.

Android for me and I also love iOS as well (have owned several Android and iPhones as well as iPad 1 & 2)

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HardyRexion

I wouldn't be too upset about losing my Android aps as I haven't paid more than £1.00 for any of them. Most of them are free. Happy with the flexibility of Android. If you take into account everything (apps, spec, PRICE) then Android is the only way for me.

Google maps is fantastic too considering its free. The Sat Nav on my Desire is better than my daughter's TOM TOM. Tells me traffic hotspots and alternative routes around. Very impressed.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not Anti-MS, for me, if you add up all the pros and cons of WP7/IOS/Android then Android wins hands down. The second I feel different, I'll swap.

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TheLegendOfMart

Not a chance. All the devices I've seen are way under spec'd (why pay for last years tech?), the UI is ugly and I really don't think the platform will ever catch on with the general masses.

Android for me and I also love iOS as well (have owned several Android and iPhones as well as iPad 1 & 2)

The reason why they are 'under' spec'd is the OS is optimised for the hardware, Android has to cater for all the cheap low end handsets, WP7 doesnt need as much processing power to run the OS as Android does.

Personally this 1Ghz HD7 is as fast as any other Android Phone ive used.

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Muhammad Farrukh

Not a chance. All the devices I've seen are way under spec'd (why pay for last years tech?)

You can argue whatever you want about the software but the fact that Android needs latest dual-core 1.4-1.5 GHz processors, that berely works, doesn't mean that all the other OS' also.

I can see why you are calling them under-specced. Because you have never used it.

If you've used it you'd know how well it destroys the competition with its old single core 1 GHz processors. The competition being the latest Android running 1.5 GHz dual core ones.

We pay for last years tech because it doesn't matter as long as we get the most fluid, lag-free experience unlike Android where the latest dual core CPUs cant handle the lagness.

I really don't think the platform will ever catch on with the general masses.

It will.

You'll see. We all will see.

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Jan

When they give competitive apps. I mean £2.29 for the majority of 69p iOS games that are still cheaper on Android. So what if they have XBOX Live, Game Centre on iOS4/5 is free. I don't care about achievements, I just want to play games when bored and not pay ridiculous amounts for them.

So staying with Android here.

Game Center is awful, where as Xbox Live is one of the, if not the best online gaming platform in the world.

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bobbyfabulous

The reason why they are 'under' spec'd is the OS is optimised for the hardware, Android has to cater for all the cheap low end handsets, WP7 doesnt need as much processing power to run the OS as Android does.

Personally this 1Ghz HD7 is as fast as any other Android Phone ive used.

You can argue whatever you want about the software but the fact that Android needs latest dual-core 1.4-1.5 GHz processors, that berely works, doesn't mean that all the other OS' also.

....

If you've used it you'd know how well it destroys the competition with its old single core 1 GHz processors. The competition being the latest Android running 1.5 GHz dual core ones.

We pay for last years tech because it doesn't matter as long as we get the most fluid, lag-free experience unlike Android where the latest dual core CPUs cant handle the lagness.

iOS is highly optimized and runs on 2 1/2 year hardware yet the new iPhone 4s is dual core and has a hi res display...

What happens when the next OS update comes, or games or apps that require more power? The fact is WP7 devices are low spec'd, why would anyone want to pay for tech that was standard in Android and iPhones in 2010 when it is nearly 2012?

I can see why you are calling them under-specced. Because you have never used it.

No. I am calling them under-spec'd because they literally are in comparison to the competition. They are using Adreno 205 GPU that was standard fare over a year ago, single core cpu's and low resolution displays.

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TheLegendOfMart

iOS is highly optimized and runs on 2 1/2 year hardware yet the new iPhone 4s is dual core and has a hi res display...

What happens when the next OS update comes, or games or apps that require more power? The fact is WP7 devices are low spec'd, why would anyone want to pay for tech that was standard in Android and iPhones in 2010 when it is nearly 2012?

Not in my experience, I have several friends trying to run IOS5 on 3GS and having lots of performance problems.

The 4S is a brand new phone less than a month old. WP7 is running on a 1Ghz Snapdragon reference platform that was the norm a year ago, most Android phones were running 800mhz-1Ghz at the time WP7 came out.

There are some 'Mango' handsets coming out soon that use 1.4ghz+ Single Core and some Dual Core ones coming out soon.

Phones arent PCs, the WP7 reference spec was a set specification which meant any phone could run Windows Phone 7 as smooth as the next, its heavily optimised for that reference platform, suddenly adding dual core isnt going to do much. I do agree it could have had a better GPU but i havent played any 3D games on my phone yet.

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Darrian

I have a HTC Trophy that I modified by swapping out the sd card for 32gb, and I love it. However, after seeing these new Nokia phones I am starting to get jealous. I hope Verizon picks up Nokia so that in a couple years when my contract is up and I'm eligible for a phone upgrade I can get the latest Nokia phone at that time (unless of course HTC or another manufacturer comes out with another Windows phone that I like better than what Nokia is offering). I hate to wait that long, but I just got this phone and it was free with the contract, so I'd rather not go spending a bunch of money on a new phone right now when I just got a new phone and I'm quite happy with it.

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Muhammad Farrukh

iOS is highly optimized and runs on 2 1/2 year hardware yet the new iPhone 4s is dual core and has a hi res display...

What happens when the next OS update comes, or games or apps that require more power? The fact is WP7 devices are low spec'd, why would anyone want to pay for tech that was standard in Android and iPhones in 2010 when it is nearly 2012?

No. I am calling them under-spec'd because they literally are in comparison to the competition. They are using Adreno 205 GPU that was standard fare over a year ago, single core cpu's and low resolution displays.

Pit the trio of the devices side by side (Android, WP7 and iOS) and you'll know how much faster these 'under-specced devices' are

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neo158

windows mobile isn't going anywhere. ios and android are eating windows mobile for breakfast.

You're right Windows MOBILE isn't, Windows PHONE is.

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Muhammad Farrukh

windows mobile isn't going anywhere. ios and android are eating windows mobile for breakfast.

True.

They are eating Windows mobile for breakfast

And Windows Phone will be eating Android for breakfast, iOS for lunch and both of them combined for dinner

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neo158

True.

They are eating Windows mobile for breakfast

And Windows Phone will be eating Android for breakfast, iOS for lunch and both of them combined for dinner

QFT

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Elliott

No, I'm not likely to switch. I'm happy with the direction of the iPhone and iOS, though Windows Phone would easily be my second choice if something caused me to drop iOS.

Android is just...ugh...

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Muhammad Farrukh

Android is just...ugh...

:D

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