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FaiKee

New File System REFS; I believe Neowin News will report on it.

http://winunleaked.tk/2011/12/good-bye-protogon-welcome-refs/

image_114.jpg

Yesterday canouna said he was downloading a new build, he didn't say which build, I believe it's 8163 or 8164. And from his report on WinUnleaked, he was able to format; but failed to install win8 on this partition.

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+Frank B.

Interesting find. Any information yet in how far it differs from NTFS, and what it will be used for?

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Steven P.

New File System REFS; I believe Neowin News will report on it.

http://winunleaked.t...n-welcome-refs/

image_114.jpg

Yesterday canouna said he was downloading a new build, he didn't say which build, I believe it's 8163 or 8164. And from his report on WinUnleaked, he was able to format; but failed to install win8 on this partition.

Thanks, we're writing something up now :)

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FaiKee

2 days ago, a post in PCBeta showed a few screen-shots of build 8158, one of which is the desktop, it showed the charm bar is on the right side of the screen, and unlike WDP, it is brought out by bringing the mouse to bottom-right of the screen:

http://bbs.pcbeta.co...947811-1-1.html

image_118.jpg

To-day, canouna showed a screen-shot of build 816x; what's interesting is that the charm bar is transparent:

http://forums.mydigi...ll=1#post515406

screen781.jpg

According to canouna, the charm-bar in his build 815x is also transparent. .....my guess is, maybe different themes would trigger different charm-bar style,

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FMH

^ So we have two Start icons now? :huh:

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Steven P.

snip.

Cheers, I've written something up.

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FaiKee

According to a new blog in win8china, in the new win8 builds(probably 815x), the name "Control Panel" in the metro apps tile was changed to "PC Settings", and there are "lots of added functions" - however, they have not elaborated on what has changed or added. Hopefully they(or canouna) would tell us more about the changes in "PC Settings", aka "Control Panel"

http://www.win8china.com/html/311.html

screen783.jpg

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Jan

It's nice to see Microsoft changing the colour of the tiles to match each other (Y)

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Steven P.

According to a new blog in win8china, in the new win8 builds(probably 815x), the name "Control Panel" in the metro apps tile was changed to "PC Settings", and there are "lots of added functions" - however, they have not elaborated on what has changed or added. Hopefully they(or canouna) would tell us more about the changes in "PC Settings", aka "Control Panel"

http://www.win8china.com/html/311.html

screen783.jpg

Yeah saw that yesterday, it's still a somewhat dumbed down version of the Control Panel though, and there isn't too much known about it.

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George P

There's that talk about the ARM version of Win8 not having the desktop as well, dunno if anyone brought that up yet. MS seems to be going back and forth with the idea of having the desktop or not having the desktop on ARM systems/tablets.

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Steven P.

There's that talk about the ARM version of Win8 not having the desktop as well, dunno if anyone brought that up yet. MS seems to be going back and forth with the idea of having the desktop or not having the desktop on ARM systems/tablets.

Yeah we reported on that in the last week.

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Ben Dyson

Also, 'My Computer' has been renamed to 'Computer', I posted it on the article but thought I would post here as well.

The source is the same as the above, Win8China.

Edit: Sorry - Just found that it was changed with Vista.

My mistake, That will teach me to post things without checking they are true, I was just going by a source.

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George P

Also, 'My Computer' has been renamed to 'Computer', I posted it on the article but thought I would post here as well.

The source is the same as the above, Win8China.

Didn't they change that name long ago with Vista? Or was it back to My Computer in the Win8 Dev Preview again? I don't remember.

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Steven P.

Also, 'My Computer' has been renamed to 'Computer', I posted it on the article but thought I would post here as well.

The source is the same as the above, Win8China.

The "My" prefix was dropped in Vista mate :p If you're running Windows 7 have a look in your Start Menu ;)

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Chemaz

shouldn't it be PC Settings instead of PC settings?

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FaiKee

Yeah, I just noticed that in the PCBeta screen-shots of 8158, it is changed to PC settings, must have missed it.

Actually, in WinUnleaked, canouna has put up a video(mentioned by Mephistopheles in post#19) which showed some glimpses of the Metro Control panel, but it was quite out-focused, and I guess it's still called "Control Panel" in that video shot.

screen784.jpg

btw, the thing about "computer" is the change of the Simplified Chinese translation, in fact, it doesn't even apply to Tradition Chinese transllation, that's why I didn't mentioned it.

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FaiKee

In MDL those guys also had a confusion about the "computer" mentioned in win8china, I gave an explaination, and believe I might as well put it here too:

- about "Computer": it is the change of Simplified Chinese translation in zn/CH, but when you guys translated the win8china blog, everything is in English, and gave you the illusion it is about en/US.

When the term "computer" was first introduced, in Traditional Chinese it is "electric brain", in Sim. Chinese it is "calculating machine", but in real life everybody calls it electric brain.

In XP, zn/CH showed "My Electric Brain", in Vista, some wise guy changed it to "Calculating Machine", now in win8, it's changed to "Electric Brain", that's it.

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FaiKee

Actually in a earlier Technet Blog, MS had mentioned the Storage Spaces/Pool feature in W8S, but the fact that this feature is available in a win8 client build CP(canouna had mentioned that it is available in all latest win8 builds), does it imply that this feature will be included in win8 client builds? atm it is just to anybodies' guess.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/server-cloud/archive/2011/11/23/windows-8-platform-storage-part-1.aspx

screen794.jpg

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