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[Network] Unidentified Network


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leesmithg

Hello.

Problem my daughters PC acquired yesterday.

post-66351-0-78671400-1325674339_thumb.j

I tried this and that and thought that manually adding ip address, gateway subnet etc might help.

Wrong, well I could update the antivirus, but no browse the net.

Where is say 'Unidentified Network', that changed to Home Network.

However it seems no connection to router then to the net.

The notification icon for network connection is on full, connected and has an exclamation mark.

So any ideas on how to get the network back to full working order, as a home network and able to browse the net?

Thanks in advance Lee

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StrikedOut

When you change the DHCP settings to obtain the IP settings automaticaly, what do you get if you go to a CMD prompt and type IPCONFIG /ALL?

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leesmithg

DHCP currently has errors, this was something I am trying to resolve, as I noticed that my daughters isn't enabled via IPv4. mine is.

Services.msc keeps giving errors when I try starting DHCP.

edit/ is now enabled via IPv4, however cannot get service to start error 1079

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spUrr

Did you reboot router and pc before you changed anything also?

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leesmithg

I reset router this morning to try cure the problem.

Didn't work.

My connection is fine, my sons is fine and my Suzie's is fine.

I was just wondering is there a way of totally removing all stored information about previous connections and starting again?

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spUrr

'Manage Wireless Networks' in 'Network and Sharing Center' will allow you to remove all wireless connections.

Do what ^ StrikedOut said to do.

I don't think you're ready to reset the stack just yet :huh: which would be:

netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt

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StrikedOut

You can remove the profiles in the wireless settings or you can uninstall the device in device manager which I believe will give you the same result, just remember not to remove the driver files. When you reboot it will re-install the drivers for your wireless connection and you can try to connect to the wireless again.

A bit of a heavy handed approach but could be the quickest resolution.

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MaxBurke

Just out of curiosity, is it a BT Home Hub 2 your using?

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leesmithg

Hello Max, no version 3.

edit/I sorted out DHCP erros also.

Here is where the problem lies, IPv4 assigns a wrong address.

Mine:

post-66351-0-98268600-1325680068.jpg

Daughters:

post-66351-0-31609500-1325680114.jpg

Sons:

post-66351-0-02676600-1325680133.jpg

Thanks for replies.

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Daedroth

First, I would disable IPv6 on all your computers, as it's pointless for you, and can cause an unnecessary problem.

The fact that your daughter's computer is getting a 169. IP address means it doesn't know where to get it's IP from.

I see you are connecting via wireless. Try deleting all wireless profiles, and try again. Use Windows' wireless features, rather than 3rd party applications.

Ensure you're connecting to the correct wireless signal.

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StepASide

Oh it's the awful 169.x.x.x !! I suffered the same and tried everything possible.. enable/disable some network/router services, upadating router table something.. At last, to fix it, I had to re-install Windows again..

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StrikedOut

^^ Dont do this, not necessary. What firewall are you using? IF you put a manual IP address in are you able to ping 192.168.1.254? Did you try to uninstall the wireless driver?

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+BudMan

169.254 means that a dhcp client did not get any answers from dhcp server. For starters I would connect with a wire vs wireless when troubleshooting if its s dhcp issue or not -- you said your dhcp service was not starting?

So connect it with a wire to your router - do you get a 192.168 address then, and does network work, etc.

If not then you got dhcp issue, still on wire assign a static IPv4 address -- does it work then? If not then you got something really wrong with the stack. If all works with wire just fine, dhcp, etc. Then its a wireless issue and not dhcp, etc.

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StrikedOut

Just noticed it is a USB adapter, do you have the latest drivers?

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Nick H.

Oh it's the awful 169.x.x.x !! I suffered the same and tried everything possible.. enable/disable some network/router services, upadating router table something.. At last, to fix it, I had to re-install Windows again.

That reminds me of the time I saw a spider in my bathroom, so I dropped a nuke on my apartment to kill it.

How does your daughter's laptop work with other networks? Can she connect without a problem?

EDIT: I have just realised that you mentioned that the daughter has a PC, which I guess makes my question a bit more difficult to answer.

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RATiO

I had this problem recently. Kept getting an apipa address (169.254.x.x). It happened after switching the USB port I was using the adapter on. Are you plugging it into some kind of USB hub? If so try plugging it directly into PC. If your daughter has changed the port she plugged it into try putting it back where it was. I have found after years of using wireless adapters that Windows installs a whole new driver everytime you change usb port and you endup with things like Wireless connection #2, Wireless connection #3 etc

Also, is it possible there is malware on the machine? And make sure all neccesary wireless networking services are running especially DHCP client. I don't have a list to hand but look around on net you will find. Finally, try setting a manual IP address (I take it you know how?) 192.168.1.xx with a gateway of 192.168.1.254, a dns of 192.168.1.254 and subnet 255.255.255.0.

Oh and if theres anything resembling 'Microsoft Virtual Wi-Fi Miniport Adapter' in Wireless connections, disable it.

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cybertimber2008

First, I would disable IPv6 on all your computers, as it's pointless for you, and can cause an unnecessary problem.

Not a smart suggestion. Windows 7 and Server 2008 use IPv6 for background communications, and with IPv4 addresses having been exhausted, IPv6 will eventually be at home too.

Oh it's the awful 169.x.x.x !! I suffered the same and tried everything possible.. enable/disable some network/router services, upadating router table something.. At last, to fix it, I had to re-install Windows again..

As others have said, 169.x.x.x is is address that you get when you fail to recieve an IP address from a DHCP server. It's an RFC.
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Daedroth

Not a smart suggestion. Windows 7 and Server 2008 use IPv6 for background communications, and with IPv4 addresses having been exhausted, IPv6 will eventually be at home too.

As others have said, 169.x.x.x is is address that you get when you fail to recieve an IP address from a DHCP server. It's an RFC.

I agree with that, I had forgotten that. However I don't agree with the latter part of that statement. IPv4 and IPv6 will be co-existant. IPv6 will only be needed on outward facing connections, such as a WAN port on a router/modem. Internal switched networks will stay IPv4 for a long, long time to come. Can you imagine re-designing an internal network using these addresses?: 3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf. Instead of 10.16.45.129 (for example).

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+BudMan

"Windows 7 and Server 2008 use IPv6 for background communications"

NO THEY DON'T -- don't go spouting nonsense. Now if your using homegroups, then yes ipv6 is used in that.

I have to agree if your NOT using a protocol, then that protocol should not be running.. If you not actively using ipv6, then there is no reason for it to be enabled. And it is quite simple to disable

from elevated cmd prompt

reg add hklm\system\currentcontrolset\services\tcpip6\parameters /v DisabledComponents /t REG_DWORD /d 255

Reboot

If you want it back simple as removal of the regkey

reg delete hklm\system\currentcontrolset\services\tcpip6\parameters\ /v DisabledComponents /f

Now if you WANT to play with IPv6 -- then more power you, but do it RIGHT, don't just leave the nonsense that MS leaves running run because you don't understand it.

I run it on a few machines on my network because yes some day it will be main stream -- personally I think it 5 to 10 years out yet for sure. But if going to play with it -- then go get yourself a FREE tunnel if your ISP does not support it yet (most likely) you can get one at hurricane electric. Also I would go through their course and get certified.. When you reach Sage level you get a Free t-shirt. Takes all of about an hour to get to that level if you have an understanding of IPv6 and networking in general. You have to bring up a few services on ipv6, etc. http://ipv6.he.net/certification/

But again NO win7 and Server 2008 have no NEED of ipv6 to talk in the background -- in the background to who btw???

For starters disabling ipv6 will make your ipconfig /all easier to read.. And if you setup ipv6 correctly its not as cluttered as having teredo and every other thing MS turns on by default.. Its not the way I would of done it for sure -- everything security says to disable until required, sorry but ipv6 is not required so have it it installed but not enabled. Users that need it can quite easy enable the aspects of it they need.

I am using IPv6 on this box

C:\>ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : i5-w7
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . : local.lan
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : local.lan

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 18-03-73-B1-0D-D3
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:xxxx:b85::666(Preferred)
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::e0cd:efb8:f50:7e7b%13(Preferred)
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100(Preferred)
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:xxxx:b85::1
									   192.168.1.253
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.253
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

C:\>ping ipv6.google.com

Pinging ipv6.l.google.com [2607:f8b0:4001:c01::67] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 2607:f8b0:4001:c01::67: time=44ms
Reply from 2607:f8b0:4001:c01::67: time=44ms

Yes I sniped out part of my global ipv6 address -- because yeah you can get to that from internet, not like private IP. Link locals are just that local links - so no reason to hide those.

But again I agree if NOT actively using ipv6, then reason to have it running -- disable it, but that is not going to fix his issue at all. At best make reading ipconfig a bit easier.

edit:

"IPv6 will only be needed on outward facing connections"

You really don't grasp the concept of using IPv6 do you.. When all said and done all devices will have IPv6 address and ipv4 will be gone. There will be not reason for nat, etc. All devices in fact will have multiple ipv6 addresses, both local link and global, etc..

DNS is your Friend with working with devices that are on ipv6 ;) Because even with shortcuts the addresses can be a bit long ;)

When you get your FREE tunnel from HE, you get a /64 -- every strand of carpet in your house could have its own unique IP and it would not even dent your available space with a /64 -- and if you want you can get a /48 so you can route multiple /64s ;)

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Nerd Rage

I've seen this issue on 3 different computers (Win 7) in our environment over the last year. I've yet to find a fix for it. I've tried nuking the adapters, nuking the network locations, etc, the issue would always remain.

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Daedroth
I have to agree if your NOT using a protocol, then that protocol should not be running.. If you not actively using ipv6, then there is no reason for it to be enabled. And it is quite simple to disable

from elevated cmd prompt

reg add hklm\system\currentcontrolset\services\tcpip6\parameters /v DisabledComponents /t REG_DWORD /d 255

Reboot

There is an easier way, for the less technically advanced. Go into your network connections, right click your adapter and go into Properties. Remove the tick from IPv6. Apply > OK. Reboot.

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leesmithg

Hello again.

It cannot connect to anything past the router, even Home Group is stuffed.

I ran a command as administrator via cmd and it is (without quotes) 'netsh interface ipv4 reset' that did not work either.

I have tried everything else mentioned here also.

Will have to bing around and see what I can find.

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+BudMan

"Remove the tick from IPv6. Apply > OK. Reboot."

That does not remove the output from ipconfig /all though ;)

see

post-14624-0-75341000-1325696183_thumb.j

How much technical skill does it require to open an elevated cmd prompt and paste in a command? ;)

"I have tried everything else mentioned here also."

So you connected this box to your router with a WIRE??

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Daedroth

"Remove the tick from IPv6. Apply > OK. Reboot."

That does not remove the output from ipconfig /all though ;)

Home much technical skill does it require to open an elevated cmd prompt and paste in a command? ;)

"I have tried everything else mentioned here also."

So you connected this box to your router with a WIRE??

No, but registries, command lines, etc are what confuse basic users. If it can be done using the GUI, then it's better for them.

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+BudMan

If the user is confused over typing a simple command like reg add and what it is adding, then to be honest they should just sell the computer and play with their etch-a-sketch, which to be honest is probably too complicated for them as well ;)

Here you go -- just have them grab the fixit from MS to disable ipv6 -- I know for a fact downloading and running files is not too complicated for any user - because that is how they infect themselves 99% of the time ;)

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929852

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Daedroth

If the user is confused over typing a simple command like reg add and what it is adding, then to be honest they should just sell the computer and play with their etch-a-sketch, which to be honest is probably too complicated for them as well ;)

Here you go -- just have them grab the fixit from MS to disable ipv6 -- I know for a fact downloading and running files is not too complicated for any user - because that is how they infect themselves 99% of the time ;)

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929852

You don't have experience with basic users do you? Not everyone needs to know how to hack the registry just to use a computer.

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