Disable Hard Drive Spin down?


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brianicoleman

ok so im having this computer annoyance and maybe you guys can help me out.

setup:

i have 3 HDD in my computer. 1 with with OS and programs, one as a media drive and 1 as a random drive. all 3 drives are internal, and not 'green' drives.

problem:

when i use them for the first time in a while (like get home from work after leaving my pc running while at work) the initial time i open a directory or file on either of my non-OS drives it has about a 2-3 second lag while opening. i feel like they are spinning down to save power or something. they run fine after the 2-3 second delay but its decently annoying. i have checked my power settings in windows 7, but its nothing set wrong in there that i saw.

any ideas?

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Jason S.

in device manager, there's the option - "allow this device to turn off to save power." maybe thats it?

the only other thing i can think of is the advanced power settings. one of the trees is for hard drives...

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AJerman

Nothing is set wrong because that's how it's supposed to be. It saves power and saves wear on the drive motor, so I'd highly suggest that you leave it enabled. As you said, it only takes 2 to 3 seconds to spin up. Anyway, I'm not on Windows 7 to look, but this option was always in the same power options as the ones that turn off your monitor after inactivity. Should be pretty easy to google and find out.

Edit: The first result on Google is even a link to a thread here: http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/983350-turn-off-hdd-spin-down-windows-7/ Don't forget to search before posting!

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PGHammer

in device manager, there's the option - "allow this device to turn off to save power." maybe thats it?

the only other thing i can think of is the advanced power settings. one of the trees is for hard drives...

That is indeed where to find it (Control Panel->Power->Advanced Settings. I have a single *green* HDD (my boot drive, actually), and I have HDD spindown set to "Never".

(I have a modified High Performance powerr plan as my default, with monitor shutdown also set to "Never" - instead, I physically turn it off when away from the desktop.)

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brianicoleman

i believe i foun what i was looking for here:

Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Power Options\Edit Plan Settings

Change Advanced Power Settings

Then under the Hard Drives heading:  "Turn off hard disks after" setting.

awesome, thanks for they help

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threetonesun

Why would you set the hard drive spindown to "never"? This is up there with obsessing about how much free RAM you have.

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Jason S.

Why would you set the hard drive spindown to "never"? This is up there with obsessing about how much free RAM you have.

in theory, spining the hd up and down all the time puts strain on the motor. leaving it running means less power-on strain. again, in theory.

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AJerman

in theory, spining the hd up and down all the time puts strain on the motor. leaving it running means less power-on strain. again, in theory.

In more logical theory, keeping it running 24/7 puts more strain on the motor than it spinning up and down a few times a day.

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cybertimber2008

in theory, spining the hd up and down all the time puts strain on the motor. leaving it running means less power-on strain. again, in theory.

Which part of the motor is stressed by spinning up and down, in theory of course?

I mean... it's not like its turning off and on rapidly (1 minue idle turn off) which I could see causing wear and tear. After 20 minutes of idle, it's likely to assume you aren't coming back for ahwile.

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Sir Topham Hatt

in theory, spining the hd up and down all the time puts strain on the motor. leaving it running means less power-on strain. again, in theory.

But in practice. . . :p

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+PeterUK

In more logical theory, keeping it running 24/7 puts more strain on the motor than it spinning up and down a few times a day.

Spinning down doesn?t strain the motor its spinning it up that puts strain on the motor as the motor is a short from a spinning start requiring a controlled amount of high current with voltage to get it going and its this that puts strain on the motor. When the motor is up to speed very little current with voltage is needed to keep to speed in check because of momentum of the platters what then happens is you put wear on the motors ball bearings & contact brushes for running it 24/7.

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Another Canuck

There's arguments to both cases, so really, who cares. Hard drives have rated MTBFs and warranties that cover them, they're designed to handle 24/7 use and repetitive spin-up.

I'm in the same boat as the OP. The reason I disable it is because it adds lag time when I need to access a file on a sleeping hard drive.

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+ir0nw0lf

Sounds like the still ongoing age old discussion/argument over power supplies, ie. whether or not turning them on/off all the time puts more wear & tear on them. I got into some pretty heated arguments over this as long back as 15+ years ago LOL. (<-- age giveaway there)

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AJerman

The lack of patience that some of you have amazes me.

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Brandon H

[rant] no offense but "OOO a 2 second wait before i can access the files on my hard-drive"

in all honesty why are you annoyed at a TWO SECOND wait that only happens ONCE every now and then when your away from your computer for awhile?

if it was something like 20 or 30 seconds i'd understand your annoyance but a whole 2 seconds isn't all that big of deal for something like this [/rant]

sorry just had to get that off my chest as i don't see why it's being made to be such a big deal

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Another Canuck

The lack of patience that some of you have amazes me.

Sorry, but if I'm working and I constantly have to wait for my drive to spin up, it quickly becomes annoying.

I could increase the timer, but then it will rarely trigger, so what's the point? I may as well just disable it

We install SSDs in our systems, overclock our CPUs, RAID our drives, double-up our GPUs all to shave seconds or milliseconds off of daily operations. It's not impatience; we live in an instantaneous world now with expectations of how fast certain actions should take. When said actions suddenly take longer than expected - yes - it's aggravating.

You've never been frustrated at your cable box that is slow to respond? Smartphone that locks up? Etc. It's the same thing.

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mrp04

Sorry, but if I'm working and I constantly have to wait for my drive to spin up, it quickly becomes annoying.

I could increase the timer, but then it will rarely trigger, so what's the point? I may as well just disable it

We install SSDs in our systems, overclock our CPUs, RAID our drives, double-up our GPUs all to shave seconds or milliseconds off of daily operations. It's not impatience; we live in an instantaneous world now with expectations of how fast certain actions should take. When said actions suddenly takes longer than expected - yes - it's aggravating.

You've never been frustrated at your cable box that is slow to respond? Smartphone that locks up? Etc. It's the same thing.

If you're actually using the drive it shouldn't spin down. Do you leave your computer on overnight? If you do, then it's better to increase the timer instead of disabling it. If the drive really does get accessed constantly the whole time the computer is on, then you may as well disable it.

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Another Canuck

If you're actually using the drive it shouldn't spin down. Do you leave your computer on overnight? If you do, then it's better to increase the timer instead of disabling it. If the drive really does get accessed constantly the whole time the computer is on, then you may as well disable it.

I don't leave my computer on overnight, in-fact I put it to sleep whenever I leave my room for any extended period of time.

It's not that I'm accessing the drive constantly. Windows defaults to 20 minutes before putting the drive to sleep. I access my data storage drive on average every 15 to 30 minutes. So more often than not, the drive is asleep.

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+warwagon

I leave all my drives spinning to. If a drive is going to fail it will more than likely do so upon spinning back up. same goes for a lot of stuff. You always hear people say "I turned my computer off at night, and now it won't turn back on"

it's that spinning up that puts strain on the motor. So I leave all my drives on.

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AJerman
Sorry, but if I'm working and I constantly have to wait for my drive to spin up, it quickly becomes annoying. I could increase the timer, but then it will rarely trigger, so what's the point? I may as well just disable it We install SSDs in our systems, overclock our CPUs, RAID our drives, double-up our GPUs all to shave seconds or milliseconds off of daily operations. It's not impatience; we live in an instantaneous world now with expectations of how fast certain actions should take. When said actions suddenly take longer than expected - yes - it's aggravating. You've never been frustrated at your cable box that is slow to respond? Smartphone that locks up? Etc. It's the same thing.

Well, I disagree. I don't think they are at all the same. You're talking a 2-3 second delay a few times a day vs optimizing speed for something you use the entire time (faster CPU/GPU, OC, etc to make the computer run faster the entire time you use it). But hey, whatever works for you guys! If you access the drive PERFECTLY so that it just spun down 10 minutes ago and you're spinning it back up, then set the spin down time to an hour even. Best of both worlds.

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Ravensky

If I wanted patience I would have been a Dr. LOL... I know it's spelled differently ... don't troll it's a joke!

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cybertimber2008

I leave all my drives spinning to. If a drive is going to fail it will more than likely do so upon spinning back up. same goes for a lot of stuff. You always hear people say "I turned my computer off at night, and now it won't turn back on"

it's that spinning up that puts strain on the motor. So I leave all my drives on.

I had one fail while I was using it just last weekend.

That said, there are other mechanical parts besides the motor that rotates the platters... as well as other components that can fail.

Would a defragmented harddrive wear the head arm motor less? yes. Would it prolong the life of the drive? Depends if the arm is what is going to be the part that would have broken anyway.

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+warwagon

I had one fail while I was using it just last weekend.

That said, there are other mechanical parts besides the motor that rotates the platters... as well as other components that can fail.

Would a defragmented harddrive wear the head arm motor less? yes. Would it prolong the life of the drive? Depends if the arm is what is going to be the part that would have broken anyway.

Which is why I said "more than likely" and not absolute!" :)

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Edrick Smith

So wait you're saying that having the drive spin is going to dramatically shorten its life? Yet how do you think server and storage arrays work?

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+warwagon

From the google hard drive study

Power Cycles.

The power cycles indicator counts the

number of times a drive is powered up and down. In

a server-class deployment, in which drives are powered

continuously, we do not expect to reach high enough

power cycle counts to see any effects on failure rates.

Our results find that for drives aged up to two years, this

is true, there is no significant correlation between failures

and high power cycles count. But for drives 3 years

and older, higher power cycle counts can increase the

absolute failure rate by over 2%. We believe this is due

more to our population mix than to aging effects. Moreover,

this correlation could be the effect (not the cause)

of troubled machines that require many repair iterations

and thus many power cycles to be fixed.

Power-on hours

Although we do not dispute that

power-on hours might have an effect on drive lifetime,

it happens that in our deployment the age of the drive is

an excellent approximation for that parameter, given that

our drives remain powered on for most of their life time..

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      No more old Edge


      It’s no use dancing around the subject, ye olde Edge of 2015, otherwise known under it original codename of Project Spartan, is now no longer supported. As our very own Rich Woods has dubbed it, Dedge, due to being supplanted by the Chromium-based version - initially announced in 2018 and reached GA in 2020 – is now for all intents and purposes dead.

      While EdgeHTML and Legacy Edge themselves are ending, support for WebView is not, and in fact has been enhanced via WebView2, supported in the latest variant of the browser. To draw a line in the sand, Microsoft will be removing Legacy Edge from Windows 10 systems with the April Patch Tuesday set of updates, provided you’re on version 1803 or newer. What’ll happen with 1607 and 1507 from the Long-Term Servicing Branches is as of yet unclear.

      The firm isn’t waiting until April to move forward on certain platforms though, as Chromium Edge is starting to get rolled out to folks on Xbox, and the macOS version is ditching AutoUpdate in favor of the much more sane – and speedy – implementation that’s currently found on Windows.

      Edge Dev 90.0.818.0 is also out, allowing folks to sort Collections, adding an option to disable the Dev Mode extensions popup, and more. Though coming later this year in version 92, Microsoft will also allow folks to sync the payment information across all signed-in devices, a feature set to debut after the ability to scan the Clipboard for relevant info, bulk password delete support, the expansion of the history search function, and more PDF improvements.

      And finally, Microsoft has decided that four distinct channels really weren’t enough, so there’s now a fifth one. From most to least frequently updated we have Canary, Dev, Beta, and Stable, and joining the roster is now an Extended Stable channel.

      All Chromium-browsers are set to adopt the four-week release schedule as outlined by Google, but the Extended Stable channel on Microsoft’s side is aimed at business, and will be updated every eight weeks. In essence, business customers will receive every other update and biweekly security updates.

      Dev channel
      New firmware updates have been pushed out to the Surface Go and Laptop Go, with the Intel-powered Surface Laptop 3 getting some driver updates. In terms of new hardware, Microsoft is rumored to announce the Laptop 4 with last-gen Ryzen chips and current-gen Intel chips, as well as a new webcam this spring. For the few folks that were using it, the Cortana functionality in the Invoke speaker has now been removed. Dark mode for the unified Office app on Android is in the works, while Whiteboard is now in preview on the platform, but not for personal accounts. On the other end of the spectrum, the Microsoft Store for Business and Education may be killed off soon, while the company’s UserVoice feedback pages have already gone the way of the Dodo. Microsoft and Intel are collaborating with DARPA to help out with the Data Protection In Virtual Environments encryption project (otherwise known as DPRIVE), while the former has expanded its AccountGuard features to high-risk entities in 31 countries. Logging off
      We end with a bit of news concerning the ongoing Exchange kerfuffle and some Microsoft event dates.



      Let’s begin with the event dates, as a new video from leakster WalkingCat has seemingly revealed the dates for some of the company’s upcoming virtual gatherings. For one, there’s one that already happened, the March 2-4, 2021 variant of Ignite, then in chronological order Build (May 25-27), Ready (July 21-22) and finally, the fall version of Ignite (October 13-14).

      The fact that the Build dates are listed as May 25-57, as well as the fact that fall Ignite is only two days have led to some folks speculating that these are merely placeholder dates. We’ll found out more in due time.

      And speaking of time, Microsoft thought it was the time to release an advisory regarding the ongoing Exchange vulnerabilities.

      For those not aware, this is concerning Exchange on-premises servers and there are numerous attacks taking place via exploitation of four vulnerabilities, either from state-sponsored groups or other bad actors.

      Some reports state that over 30,000 organizations in the U.S. are affected, with Microsoft stating that of the 400,000 servers the company investigated on March 1, 300,000 had been patched by March 9, and that number rose to 318,000 only two days later. That still left around 82,000 exposed, but nevertheless, it’s still an impressive number to have patched in that short a time frame.

      The Redmond giant is continuing to release patches and updates to its relevant blog posts, as well as guiding folks to make use of the CISA (Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency) guidance.

      Missed any of the previous columns? Be sure to have a look right here.

    • By indospot
      Here's what's new for Windows 8.1 and 7 this Patch Tuesday
      by João Carrasqueira



      We're already three months deep into 2021, and as we reach the second Tuesday of March, that means it's time once again for Microsoft to update every supported version of Windows. Naturally, the most recent versions of Windows 10 are getting updates, but Windows 8.1 is also still supported. And, for businesses paying for extended security updates, so is Windows 7.

      There are updates heading out to both of these Windows releases, and as usual, there are two types of updates for both Windows 8.1 and Windows 7, as well as their server counterparts - a monthly rollup that's usually installed automatically and a security-only update that you have to install manually.

      Starting with Windows 8.1, the monthly rollup update is labeled KB5000848 and you can download it manually here. It includes the following changes:

      There's a single known issue, which is the same we've been seeing for months now:

      Symptom Workaround Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following:

      Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

      And as for the security-only update, that's KB5000853, and you can download it manually here. It includes the first and last bullet points from the monthly rollup update, and it has the same known issue.

      Moving on to Windows 7, again, you'll need to be paying for extended security updates to get any updates at this point. If you are, the monthly rollup you'll get is KB5000841 and you can download it manually here. Here's what's included:

      The single known issue is the same as the one for the Windows 8.1 updates.

      Finally, the security-only update for Windows 7 is KB5000851 and it can be downloaded manually here. It only includes the last two points of the updates mentioned above and has the same known issue as the other updates.