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+jnelsoninjax

A court clerk who watched hardcore pornography during a rape trial 'because he was bored' was caught looking at the explicit material right under the nose of the judge.

Debasish Majumder, 54, accessed the obscene images while the victim gave her harrowing evidence at Inner London Crown Court.

He looked at photographs of topless women being gagged and couples engaged in sexual acts, Kingston Crown Court was told.

However the judge, who was sitting directly behind him, spotted the filthy pictures as the prosecution evidence was being given.

Majumder, who had worked at Inner London Crown Court for a number of years, later admitted routinely watching porn while trials were taking place.

A search of his home computer found more extreme images, including child pornography.

Annabel Darlow, prosecuting, said: 'Majumder was working as a court clerk at Inner London and his conduct constituted a wholesale abuse of his position and the equipment provided in that he viewed porn sites on his court computer whilst the court was engaged in the conduct of a trial on an allegation of rape.'

He made the searches as the victim gave her evidence and throughout the prosecution case.

Judge Nigel Seed QC spotted a search list of explicit sexual language and at another point saw an image of a blonde engaged in a sex act on a man.

While he was in the courtroom, Majumder also looked at pictures of topless women gagged, it was heard.

Ms Darlow said: 'Judge Seed noticed what was taking place. He initially hoped that he had been mistaken or the behaviour would desist.

'On December 10 he did take action and drew the attention to the matter of the resident judge.'

When police investigated, they not only found pornography searches in the history of Majumbder's work computer but also child and extreme pornography images on his home computer.

Ms Darlow said: 'He had been working as a court clerk for a very considerable number of years and it could not have been more clear that using court computers to access or research pornography would have been anything other than clearest possible case of gross misconduct.

'The internet history was entirely representative of how Majumder chose to pass his days in court.'

Between December 9 and 10 2010 during the rape trial Majumder viewed roughly 30 images, the prosecution alleged.

He confessed to police it was not the first time he had used his time at work to search for porn.

Ms Darlow said: 'He said that he watched a lot of internet porn, he said that at work there were moments in his day that were boring and he would surf the net not to get access to sites but to get the titles of sites to use on his home computer and normally sites were blocked.

'He said that nobody in the court would be able to see what he was looking at on his screen apart from the judge and the judge would not be able to read the names as the print was too small.

'He said he only looked at porn if the case was boring and did so once or twice a week. He had been carrying out this type of behaviour since the December of the previous year.'

Majumder pleaded guilty to one charge of misconduct in public office and five counts of possession of indecent images.

On his home computer police found a number of pseudo porn images of children and 12 extreme porn pictures.

He had his sentencing postponed for further medical reports until later this month.

Susannah Stevens, defending, said that a stroke her client suffered roughly eight months ago could have affected his mental state.

She said: 'The stroke and Mr Majumder?s cognitive state might explain the complete breakdown of his thought processes and his ability to tell right from wrong and that is of huge importance when it comes to sentence.'

Majumder, of north London, may also face a separate hearing before sentence after he called into question the number of photos he accessed while in court.

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+Xinok

There's something wrong with how this story was written. This is the impression I got:

COURT CLERK CAUGHT WATCHING PORNOGRAPHY DURING TRIAL!!!

btw, he was also in possession of child pornography, but that's not the main story...

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Charisma

>.< Watching women bound up and gagged, during a rape trial, that just seems 31 flavours of wrong.

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+jnelsoninjax

There's something wrong with how this story was written. This is the impression I got:

COURT CLERK CAUGHT WATCHING PORNOGRAPHY DURING TRIAL!!!

btw, he was also in possession of child pornography, but that's not the main story...

Majumder, who had worked at Inner London Crown Court for a number of years, later admitted routinely watching porn while trials were taking place.

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+Xinok

I understand that, but the story only gives a few scant mentions of the fact that he had child porn. I don't know what the laws in the UK are regarding that, but in the US, that'll easily get you several years in prison and registered as a sex offender for life. I think that's deserving of a little more attention.

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HardyRexion

:uberhump: :drool:

:huh:

Facepalm of the decade.

Watching porn, in front of a judge??

The bigger question is, Who hired this IQ deficient imbecile for a London Court??? :huh:

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FMH

That's so silly. Watching in front of a judge.

But I wonder how many judges are involved in such behaviour. Because no one can see what they are doing. :woot:

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jakem1

I understand that, but the story only gives a few scant mentions of the fact that he had child porn. I don't know what the laws in the UK are regarding that, but in the US, that'll easily get you several years in prison and registered as a sex offender for life. I think that's deserving of a little more attention.

You're right, the article is very poorly written but it is, after all, the Daily Mail. There's clearly more to this story because it's not clear why the police were involved or why his house was searched. The charges don't stack up either - if child porn was really found on his PC then he either wasn't charged with it or they just threw the indecent images charge in because there wasn't enough evidence for a proper kiddy porn charge.

Either way, he was stupid to view porn at work but it seems unfair to charge him with a crime rather than just sack him/reprimand him.

That's so silly. Watching in front of a judge.

But I wonder how many judges are involved in such behaviour. Because no one can see what they are doing. :woot:

Some judges just sleep in court while others masturbate. :laugh:

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what

Had a smile on my face as I read through that. You couldn't make it up :p

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dead.cell

>.< Watching women bound up and gagged, during a rape trial, that just seems 31 flavours of wrong.

Yeah, that is pretty messed up...

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Glassed Silver

You know what they say... Don't judge what you haven't tried! :p

Must be thrilling in a full court room! :p

Glassed Silver:mac

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Dead_Monkey

I understand that, but the story only gives a few scant mentions of the fact that he had child porn. I don't know what the laws in the UK are regarding that, but in the US, that'll easily get you several years in prison and registered as a sex offender for life. I think that's deserving of a little more attention.

Depends, per the story:

"On his home computer police found a number of pseudo porn images of children and 12 extreme porn pictures."

What is 'pseudo porn'? Does it mean it's not porn? Does it mean they aren't children? Pseudo implies it isn't really child porn.

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Glassed Silver

Depends, per the story:

"On his home computer police found a number of pseudo porn images of children and 12 extreme porn pictures."

What is 'pseudo porn'? Does it mean it's not porn? Does it mean they aren't children? Pseudo implies it isn't really child porn.

Pseudo sounds like they want to broaden their asset for court... Nothing more :/

Either it is porn or it isn't.

Is it? -> there are laws

Is it not? -> Well, not exactly worthwhile mentioning in that regard

Glassed Silver:mac

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DDStriker

:uberhump: :drool:

:huh:

Facepalm of the decade.

Watching porn, in front of a judge??

The bigger question is, Who hired this IQ deficient imbecile for a London Court??? :huh:

Another IQ deficient imbecile :)

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ThePitt

"He only looked at porn if the case was boring and did so once or twice a week" :laugh:

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