WWII vet says nobody helped


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jdegree

DETROIT - A World War II veteran said nobody helped him in the minutes after he was attacked and carjacked during daylight at a busy Detroit gas station and he had to crawl across a concrete parking lot to get help.

A roughly four-minute surveillance video shows 86-year-old Aaron Brantley struggling to get from the fuel pump to the gas station's door as people walked and drove by him Wednesday morning. The video was first obtained by the Detroit Free Press.

http://www.newsday.com/news/nation/wwii-vet-says-nobody-helped-after-he-was-carjacked-1.3558464

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qdave

The biggest curse in our society is indifference to others. very sad. +its Detroit!

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tiagosilva29

The Lions' defense failed again. Nothing new to see here.

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Anibal P

Why anyone chooses to live in that cesspool we call Detroit just baffles the mind, this is just icing on the cake when someone gets some sense and razes the whole disgusting place ad turns it into something useful like a farm field or pasture for cattle

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bjoswald

Doesn't surprise me at all. It's a dog-eat-dog world and it's all about survival of the fittest. If you can't adapt, you're dead. Unfortunately, people don't help unless there's something in it for them.

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Southern Patriot

I'm glad I live in the south were people still actually give a damn about there fellow man, especially the elderly. Everyone in that video who ignored him should be ashamed of themselves.

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Geoffrey B.

The biggest curse in our society is indifference to others. very sad. +its Detroit!

I agree completely.

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Charisma

Doesn't surprise me at all. It's a dog-eat-dog world and it's all about survival of the fittest. If you can't adapt, you're dead. Unfortunately, people don't help unless there's something in it for them.

Or they would help, but they're afraid they'll turn around and be sued if they don't succeed, or if something unexpected happens. Or the "injured" person could be faking it to get an unsuspecting person to come to their assistance, so they can turn around and mug them. Unfortunately, it's come to this.

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Seizure1990

Or they would help, but they're afraid they'll turn around and be sued if they don't succeed, or if something unexpected happens. Or the "injured" person could be faking it to get an unsuspecting person to come to their assistance, so they can turn around and mug them. Unfortunately, it's come to this.

Naw, I think people are just unwilling to spend any effort on something that they don't think they will receive any benefit from.

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Southern Patriot

Or they would help, but they're afraid they'll turn around and be sued if they don't succeed, or if something unexpected happens. Or the "injured" person could be faking it to get an unsuspecting person to come to their assistance, so they can turn around and mug them. Unfortunately, it's come to this.

Good Samaritan laws in many places would protect someone from being sued in those cases. And I really doubt an 86 year old man is going to be mugging anyone.

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