[Official] Share your virtual identity


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Royalty

Yeah yeah yeah check my sig. ;)

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.jCliff

My website is in my sig, includes a horrid picture of myself in my about page!

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TheGhostWalker

If there's an Ambroos or AmbroosV on a website it's pretty much always me :p

http://fb.me/Ambroos

http://twitter.com/AmbroosV

http://last.fm/Ambroos

http://linkedin.com/in/Ambroos

http://gplus.to/Ambroos

Pretty convenient to have a first name pretty much nobody else has. Yes, it really, really is my first name.

Aaah, at least ONE fellow country-member :p.

 

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/sebastiaan-provost/54/372/317

http://fb.me/TheSoleWanderer

http://twitter.com/Stekkz

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cacoe

My website is in my sig, includes a horrid picture of myself in my about page!

 

Oh my god you were right  :o

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Allan

Uh ... well erm ... facebook.com/iamallan, youtube.com/iamallan2 (or AllansBibleVerses), Star Trek Online I'm @clintonseaforth ... on steam I'm "I am Allan"

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FiB3R

Didn't mean it as a personal insult, if that's what you're thinking.

 hu6g.jpg

I see you... :ninja:

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+Zagadka

I generally use a false name for all internet things. Which works out nicely, since I freaking hate my given name

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