UFO Plans Declassified by US-AF


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http://www.theverge.com/2012/10/7/3465566/us-air-force-flying-saucer-declassified

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Recently declassified documents reveal that the US Air Force was working on a flying saucer-like craft in 1956. "Project 1794" was in research and development at the USAF's Aeronautical Systems Division, and was contracted out to Canadian company Avro Aircraft Limited. The craft was designed to be a vertical take-off and landing plane that used propulsion jets to steer, and could reach a top speed between Mach 3 and Mach 4, with a ceiling of over 100,000 feet and a range of about 1,000 nautical miles. The Project 1794, Final Development Summary Report reveals that the project was going well, and would "provide a much superior performance to that estimated at the start of contract negotiations."

The report also estimated the cost of the project at $3,16,800 over a roughly two year period, which would be about $26.6 million today. The project was eventually dropped, and, as Wired points out, the USAF's other attempts to build flying saucers were considerably less effective in practice than on paper. However, it does make one wonder what other classified projects the USAF is developing using today's technology.

What do you guys think? Is the government being honest with us, or do they just want us to believe this?

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Growled

The government doesn't know how to be honest. We know they are holding out on us. The only question is to what extent.

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abysal

That's an interesting number: " $3,16,800 ".

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Obi-Wan Kenobi

That's an interesting number: " $3,16,800 ".

indeed...where do they come up with those figures? /s

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DrJohnSmitherson

That's an interesting number: " $3,16,800 ".

I guess they meant $3,160,800 haha

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tiagosilva29
Canadian company Avro Aircraft Limited
What do you guys think? Is the government being honest with us, or do they just want us to believe this?

EkP4K.gif

Nice try.

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Crisp

Not exactly a UFO... Just a failed prototype flying saucer.

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Hum

What do you guys think? Is the government being honest with us, or do they just want us to believe this?

The Avro project was a distraction from the real UFO research. It never got off the ground. :laugh:

The government doesn't know how to be honest. We know they are holding out on us. The only question is to what extent.

They've been way out in Space, decades ago. ;) The visible Space program is a farce.

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mudslag

Without proof your post is a farce

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tiagosilva29
They contracted it out to a Canadian company.

69RU1.gif

The USAF would never do that. This was something made to lure soviet spies.

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