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[ Worried ] - Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS)


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DesiSpark

so here comes ,

I'm using Windows 8 and wireless internet dongle dial-up internet.

i don't know .. after closing ,every internet related app/program, still my something is downloading from internet.

i search in internet for more than 1 hour ... and used an app DU meter. and i found a program " BITS " is running/established with internet.

so, What program it is ?????? is it the same "Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS)" http://blogs.msdn.co...rvice-bits.aspx

i want answer for these ???

1 - explain this term ??? "BITS"

2 - is it safe ??

3 - can i stop this process ??

4 - it was running and downloading something from net - then what is was downloading ?? how wud i know ??

5 - are u also facing the same ?

----

FYI -

1. i am not new user to internet.

2- i use firewall but this "BITS " firewall can't detect it untill i choose block all option .

3 - no windows update blah blah is running ...

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Aethec

It's a Windows service used both by Windows and by some apps. It's a centralized way to download low-priority stuff. For example, an app can download its updates using BITS knowing that even if the uses closes the app the update will still be downloaded, and even if the user logs off the download will resume when they log on again.

Nothing to worry about.

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+John Teacake

BITS is well known and has been around since Windows XP. Leave it alone

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a.mcdear

If I understood right and you're on dial-up, BITS may seem more active than on a PC with broadband, simply because it takes much longer to download anything at all so the service is running longer.

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DesiSpark

Thank a lot everyone. :)

@ a.mcdear - yeah its always keeps running and i have a limited data usage plan. therefore i have to keep eye on every particular process.

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sc302

Bits is needed for windows update to function.

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quick

so here comes ,

I'm using Windows 8 and wireless internet dongle dial-up internet.

i don't know .. after closing ,every internet related app/program, still my something is downloading from internet.

i search in internet for more than 1 hour ... and used an app DU meter. and i found a program " BITS " is running/established with internet.

so, What program it is ?????? is it the same "Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS)" http://blogs.msdn.co...rvice-bits.aspx

i want answer for these ???

1 - explain this term ??? "BITS"

2 - is it safe ??

3 - can i stop this process ??

4 - it was running and downloading something from net - then what is was downloading ?? how wud i know ??

5 - are u also facing the same ?

----

FYI -

1. i am not new user to internet.

2- i use firewall but this "BITS " firewall can't detect it untill i choose block all option .

3 - no windows update blah blah is running ...

Most likely its windows updates downloading the background (which uses BITS"). On dial-up it will probably tie up your internet for days lol. You could just disable the automatic updates service in windows xp, however it is not recommended to leave it disabled for long.

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Brandon Live

It's also used by the Store for downloading apps and updates. Just let it do its thing, it should never interfere with your usage of the machine (and it's aware of things like slow connections and metered networks).

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Eric

There's an option in the Windows 8 control panel under "Devices" to let it know you're on a metered connection. You can turn that on to cut down on unnecessary transfers.

There's also a few settings for limited connections under "Sync your settings".

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