Recommended Posts

Hum

NASA scientists took time on Wednesday, Nov. 28, to soothe 2012 doomsday fears, warning against the dark side of Mayan apocalypse rumors ? frightened children and suicidal teens who truly fear the world may come to an end Dec. 21.

These fears are based on misinterpretations of the Mayan calendar. On the 21st, the date of the winter solstice, a calendar cycle called the 13th b'ak'tun comes to an end. Although Maya scholars agree that the ancient Maya would not have seen this day as apocalyptic, rumors have spread that a cosmic event may end life on Earth on that day.

Thus NASA's involvement. The space agency maintains a 2012 information page debunking popular Mayan apocalypse rumors, such as the idea that a rogue planet will hit Earth on Dec. 21, killing everyone. (In fact, astronomers are quite good at detecting near-Earth objects, and any wandering planet scheduled to collide with Earth in three weeks would be the brightest object in the sky behind the sun and moon by now.)

"There is no true issue here," David Morrison, an astrobiologist at NASA Ames Research Center, said during a NASA Google+ Hangout event. "This is just a manufactured fantasy."

more

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
TPreston

Well there will be a collision on December 21 2012 but it wont be Nibiru impacting with Earth rather reality impacting with believers of this rubbish.

Oh well better just wait it out at this stage, Just remember that the very people who were accused of hiding the truth were in fact the ones telling the truth all along :rolleyes:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Tuishimi
"I think it's evil for people to propagate rumors on the Internet to frighten children," Morrison said.

?

I didn't know people did that to frighten children. Hmmm... perhaps I should hide my copy of the original (translated to english, of course) Grimm's Fairy Tales. Those are pretty horrific. Shoot, even Mrs. Piggle Wiggle has some scary stories.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hum

^ I guess today's horror movies at the theaters are still OK. :p

Link to post
Share on other sites
forster

Nooooooooooo, it's real!! I really dont want to pay my credit card/debt/mortgage bills :(

Link to post
Share on other sites
Raa

Hey, i've booked my holiday for the end of December, so I plan on partying it up. :laugh:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Growled

If the governments of the world knew that they world was coming to an end tomorrow, they would be crazy to say it. The panic would reach hysteria level in minutes.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Hum

^ You, you, conspiracy nut. :laugh:

Link to post
Share on other sites
LaP

Hollywood proved many times 2012 is real.

Link to post
Share on other sites
KingCracker

I wonder how many idiots are going to commit suicide on the 21st.

Link to post
Share on other sites
bguy_1986

I wonder how many idiots are going to commit suicide on the 21st.

Hopefully A LOT of them... More idiots gone the better off we are...

  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandon H

people seem to forget the fact that that date on the mayan calendar would have technically happened around March of this year because of leap year that we added in that the mayans didn't do on their calendar

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hum

I wonder how many idiots are going to commit suicide on the 21st.

All the ones I've sold guns & alcohol to. :shifty:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Anibal P

I wonder how many idiots are going to commit suicide on the 21st.

Not enough to do any real good :(

Link to post
Share on other sites
AJerman

Wait, there's people that don't believe the world is ending on the 21st?! Hah, suckers! I'm spending all my money now and going out with a bang!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Astra.Xtreme

people seem to forget the fact that that date on the mayan calendar would have technically happened around March of this year because of leap year that we added in that the mayans didn't do on their calendar

The Mayan calendar was based on actual days and not solar cycles like our Gregorian calendar is.

So with that said, leap days were irrelevant to the Mayans and Dec. 21st is still technically correct.

Whoever created that Facebook "myth" that went around wasn't very bright. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
oliver182

people seem to forget the fact that that date on the mayan calendar would have technically happened around March of this year because of leap year that we added in that the mayans didn't do on their calendar

Are you being serious?

Of course they didn't count leap years, because it's not based on our calendar....

Do you think that the calendar literally says Dec. 21, 2012??.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandon H

Are you being serious?

Of course they didn't count leap years, because it's not based on our calendar....

Do you think that the calendar literally says Dec. 21, 2012??.

that's the whole point, going by their calendar, for us it would of happened around march because of the changes we've made
Link to post
Share on other sites
oliver182

that's the whole point, going by their calendar, for us it would of happened around march because of the changes we've made

Wow you are really being serious...

The date Dec. 21, 2012 was calculated by MODERN archaeologist based on the Mayans calendar, no the other way around...how the Mayans would know of this thing called year 2012? , just think....

Link to post
Share on other sites
Astra.Xtreme

that's the whole point, going by their calendar, for us it would of happened around march because of the changes we've made

It's already been done. There was a conversion from Mayan to Gregorian calendar and that date came to be Dec 21st. Leap days have already been accounted for.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dot Matrix

Sad thing is, these people believe in a cover up, but I have not seen a new planet or star in the night skies, or have felt any strange gravitational pulls that would be associated with a close encounter... Have you?

Seriously, look the frak up. There's nothing there. No Nibiru. Sorry.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandon H

ok then, tell me, didn't some scientists find a larger Mayan calendar? or was my friend pulling my leg on that one too? (this is what i get for not doing my own research on it :pinch: )

Link to post
Share on other sites
Noir Angel

Different cult, all too familiar brand of crazy. Please go away now.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
TPreston

Sad thing is, these people believe in a cover up, but I have not seen a new planet or star in the night skies, or have felt any strange gravitational pulls that would be associated with a close encounter... Have you?

Seriously, look the frak up. There's nothing there. No Nibiru. Sorry.

Take a cheep camera and point it at the sun... NIBIRUuuuuuu!!!1!1!

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Hum
      The story of Santa and his flying reindeer can be traced to an unlikely source: hallucinogenic or "magic" mushrooms, according to one theory.

      "Santa is a modern counterpart of a shaman, who consumed mind-altering plants and fungi to commune with the spirit world," said John Rush, an anthropologist and instructor at Sierra College in Rocklin, Calif.

      Here are eight ways that hallucinogenic mushrooms explain the story of Santa and his reindeer.

      1. Arctic shamans gave out mushrooms on the winter solstice.

      According to the theory, the legend of Santa derives from shamans in the Siberian and Arctic regions who dropped into locals' teepeelike homes with a bag full of hallucinogenic mushrooms as presents in late December, Rush said.

      "As the story goes, up until a few hundred years ago, these practicing shamans or priests connected to the older traditions would collect Amanita muscaria (the Holy Mushroom), dry them and then give them as gifts on the winter solstice," Rush told LiveScience in an email. "Because snow is usually blocking doors, there was an opening in the roof through which people entered and exited, thus the chimney story."

       2. Mushrooms, like gifts, are found beneath pine trees.
      The Amanita muscaria mushroom, which is deep red with white flecks.

      That's just one of the symbolic connections between the Amanita muscaria mushroom and the iconography of Christmas, according to several historians and ethnomycologists, or people who study fungi's influence on human societies. Of course, not all scientists agree that the Santa story is tied to a hallucinogen.

       3. Reindeer were shaman "spirit animals."

      Reindeer are common in Siberia and northern Europe, and seek out these hallucinogenic fungi, as the area's human inhabitants have also been known to do. Donald Pfister, a Harvard University biologist who studies fungi, suggests that Siberian tribesmen who ingested fly agaric may have hallucinated that the grazing reindeer were flying.

       4. Shamans dressed like ? Santa Claus.

      These shamans "also have a tradition of dressing up like the [mushroom] ? they dress up in red suits with white spots," Ruck said.

      5. Mushrooms abound in Christmas iconography.

      Tree ornaments shaped like Amanita mushrooms and other depictions of the fungi are also prevalent in Christmas decorations throughout the world, particularly in Scandinavia and northern Europe.

       7. "A Visit from St. Nicholas" may have borrowed from shaman rituals.

      Many of the modern details of the modern-day American Santa Claus come from the 1823 poem "A Visit from St. Nicholas" (which later became famous as "'Twas the Night Before Christmas"). The poem is credited to Clement Clarke Moore, an aristocratic academic who lived in New York City.

      The origins of Moore's vision are unclear, although Arthur, Rush and Ruck all think the poet probably drew from northern European motifs that derive from Siberian or Arctic shamanic traditions.

      8. Santa is from the Arctic.

      "People who know about shamanism accept this story," Ruck said. "Is there any other reason that Santa lives in the North Pole? It is a tradition that can be traced back to Siberia."

      full story