89 posts in this topic

I guess I must be the only person with those ISO's coming out my ears.

Sadly I still have DOS 1.1 all the way through Windows Server 2012, every single one either in ISO or IMA disk image, and about 38 different variants of linux, unix, etc.

Honestly, this thread is going nowhere. All he keeps saying is "someone is hacked on the computer". DaDude.... Consider us doctors here. All you're saying is "he knows he feel bad". There is absolutely no way for us to diagnose or help him with that. If the best solution he has is to ask his kid to post on a forum, he might as well just let his "hacker friend" live the land. If he wants to get rid of it, tell him to format and start from scratch. If that's not a "good solution" then this thread is just a troll thread, and we should stop feeding the trolls.

/end thread.

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Keep the PC and buy a new Dad :devil:

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Keep the PC and buy a new Dad :devil:

I literally LOL'd....

Edit: Yay, 500 posts over the past 9 years... haha

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Yeah, there is no way that we can provide a reasonable suggestion unless we know how/why he believes he has been hacked. From the information provided so far I'm not even sure if there is a problem that needs solving.

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Smells of troll / boredom

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I would throw my dad's computer out the window too if he ever ask me to help him with a virus.

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Hello,

There is one thing I have not seen mentioned/suggested here, and that's to contact McAfee's technical support and ask them for assistance in identifying the threat, saving off the bits they need for their researchers to add detection and performing manual removal of the threat, either by walking your father through this procedure over the phone or via a remote session.

Your father made a decision to purchase a commercial software package over using a free one. Presumably, one of the reasons he did this was so that he would be able to obtain technical support in case of an issue. I would say that an issue requiring technical support's intervention has occurred, and that your father should take advantage of the support provided by the developer of the software just for such a scenario.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

P.S. I ran McAfee Associates' technical support department from 1989-1995. I am not sure what the current policies are, but when I was there it was policy to provide assistance for free to anyone who had a new, undetected threat.

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amazing how a thread can survive on so little from the OP.

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I do apologize for the confusion. It was partly my fault for starting a thread on a problem that is not mine. Since it is not my problem, it is very hard for me to provide all the details since my dad is the kind that doesn't share everything with me. Thanks for trying to help though. I appreciate it.

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Did you dad trace the IP address of hacker?

...using a GUI interface, written in Visual Basic?

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Put the hard drive in a Linux box and scan it there.

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This thread has become like politics: Too much blah blah, and no action ;)

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I'd go with what +goretsky has already suggested and contact McAffee for their customer support; if it wasn't detected by their software they should assist in omplete removal of the threat for free.

Also, if he works in networking, I'm fairly sure he can obtain a copy of an Operating System, drivers can be obtained from this mystical place called 'the Internet' and McAffee can be reinstalled from his online account - assuming he was smart enough to set on up (which if he actually works in networking, he surely would be).

This is yet another case for why it's a good idea ot have a clean image of your system stored externally for fast get up and go after a wipe.

One further note is, in the case of a rootkit stored out of the region on the drive that can be seen by Windows you may need a live CD or something to remove it.

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I don't mean any malice with this post but...

LOL

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