First attempt at HDR photography


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Looks great! No halo effect that is a marker for an HDR shot.the tonality is awesome. You did well.. :)

thank you....btw what is "halo effect" ?

post-29378-0-00487000-1368335315.jpg

post-29378-0-40202100-1368335387.jpg

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as are yours my friend. You have a good understanding of HDR. if you don't mind me asking, how many stops between your exposures? I usually go 2 stops tops.

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lol Im just a beginner....dont know the technicalities....i took 3 different shots at different exposures and then combined them in PS....my camera is a Canon Sx-40hs

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I like the photos, one because they're all amazing shots, and two because they are high resolution photos of Pakistan, which is REALLY interesting. Who is the guy on the banner?

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I like the photos, one because they're all amazing shots, and two because they are high resolution photos of Pakistan, which is REALLY interesting. Who is the guy on the banner?

Thank you for the compliments....the guy on the banner is the one and only Imran Khan >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imran_Khan

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thank you....btw what is "halo effect" ?

That light area around the light buildings and the dark sky, that's the halo he talks about. Generally it's always therein HDR due to the technicality of them, but it can be minimized.

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Well I would avoid shooting trees for HDR images, as usually when merging, you get that "haze" effect on them due to movement, i'm not saying it can't be done, i'm saying it's more difficult to shoot HDR for moving subjects than still ones.

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So you are PTI supporter??, can't give you feedback though...

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Well I would avoid shooting trees for HDR images, as usually when merging, you get that "haze" effect on them due to movement, i'm not saying it can't be done, i'm saying it's more difficult to shoot HDR for moving subjects than still ones.

Most modern HDR mergings, which is technically tone mapping as the pictures themselves are not HDR, will pick objects from only one exposure when there's movement to avoid just that.

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Most modern HDR mergings, which is technically tone mapping as the pictures themselves are not HDR, will pick objects from only one exposure when there's movement to avoid just that.

Agree, but if you look at the bushes and trees of the OPs, exactly that is happening.

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