The speed of LXDE with the awesomeness of XFCE?


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moeburn

Trying Linux on my netbook (Intel Atom N550 x64 1.5ghz, 1GB DDR3).  

 

So first I tried Mint-Cinnamon - waaaay too slow on my netbook, offers no speed improvements over Windows 7.  

 

Next I tried Lubuntu-LXDE - so very fast!  So very crappy!  Doesn't automatically create shortcuts to newly installed apps, lacks easy customization features (without manually editing config files), but can remove title bar over running programs (the opposite of Roll Window up/down), which is great for things like Chromium browser which do not need the title bar as it takes up space on my small 1024x600 screen.  Synaptic Package Manager is very fast too, loads all avail packages and searches through them quickly.  Boots faster than anything I could ever imagine.  Full-shutdown is also several seconds faster than any other distro I've tried.

 

Now I'm running Mint-XFCE - Not as fast as Lubuntu-LXDE, but faster than Cinnamon.  Way more easy-customization.  Automatically makes shortcuts from Software Manager, but Software Manager is unbearably slow.  Takes a whole minute to load info on all 60000 available software packages, searching through them is just as slow.  Also can't hide window title bars, Chromium browser now takes up an extra 32px or whatever of space.

 

Any suggestions on how to get the speed of LXDE, with the usability of XFCE, running the Synaptic Package Manager, but also automatically making shortcuts to progs it installs?

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Mindovermaster

Did you try Gnome, or possibly MATE yet? Or even Unity?

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moeburn

Did you try Gnome, or possibly MATE yet? Or even Unity?

 

Nope, which would you suggest I try first?

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sanctified

Did you try Gnome, or possibly MATE yet? Or even Unity?

 

Unity would kill his speed. The same as Gnome 3.

 

To the OP, maybe you could try Gnome 3 in fallback mode.

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Mindovermaster

Why not try them all?

 

This page might help: http://askubuntu.com/questions/65083/what-different-desktop-environments-and-shells-are-available

 

Tells you the different Desktop Environments available and how to install each one. It is not the distro much that will tone down your preformance, it is your DE. IMHO


Unity would kill his speed. The same as Gnome 3.

 

To the OP, maybe you could try Gnome 3 in fallback mode.

 

Not Unity 2d, or fallback. As you explained with Gnome.

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moeburn

Why not try them all?

 

This page might help: http://askubuntu.com/questions/65083/what-different-desktop-environments-and-shells-are-available

 

Tells you the different Desktop Environments available and how to install each one. It is not the distro much that will tone down your preformance, it is your DE. IMHO

 

Not Unity 2d, or fallback. As you explained with Gnome.

 

Well, given the page you linked, trying them all is going to take a long farking time.  I'd only try them all if the ones suggested to me by helpful forum members didn't work out.

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Mindovermaster

I'm giving an example, not teling you to load them ALL. I'm telling you what's out there.

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moeburn

Doing some reading on that page, and I've stopped at "Awesome".  It sounds perfect for me - Faster than LXDE, designed to not waste screen space, highly customizable, designed for "power users"... My only worry is that it might be a little too difficult for a linux newbie like me to use?  Does it have a GUI package manager, for example?  If not, can I add one?

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Mindovermaster

I'm not 100% sure with awesome, I tested it awhile ago. So I'm not all sure about that.

 

You might want to try Opoenbox, or at least the distro, #!crunchbang, that uses it but already has its own configuration..

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moeburn

I'm not 100% sure with awesome, I tested it awhile ago. So I'm not all sure about that.

 

You might want to try Opoenbox, or at least the distro, #!crunchbang, that uses it but already has its own configuration..

 

Just tried Awesome, also just learned how to switch using the login screen, also learned that Desktop mangers and Window managers are two different things, also entirely separate from distros.  This is getting confusing.  But awesome is clearly too advanced for me.  It's also different in that it's a tiling manager, which I don't really understand how to use and have never used before.

 

I had never even heard of crunchbang, and it sounds perfect, I'll give it a shot, thanks!

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Kreuger

You might want to try Opoenbox, or at least the distro, #!crunchbang, that uses it but already has its own configuration..

 

But that's basically what LXDE is. You're gonna have even less customization, at least of the simple kind.

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moeburn

But that's basically what LXDE is. You're gonna have even less customization, at least of the simple kind.

 

but... nooooo!  but this: 

 

 

From the Openbox website:

Openbox is a highly configurable window manager. It allows you to change almost every aspect of how you interact with your desktop and invent completely new ways to use and control it. It can be like a video game for controlling windows. But Openbox can also be kept extremely simple, as it is in the default setup, meaning that it can suit just about anybody. Openbox gives you control without making you do everything.

CrunchBang also comes with many applications chosen specifically for their hackability attributes. These include Conky, the customisable system monitor tool, and Thunar, the popular and highly configurable file manager.

 

Although in my experience, they all say they are "highly configurable".  I'll just have to wait till it finishes downloading to see.  I just hope it can make a window 7 dual boot for me, like all the other distros have so far.

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Fish

Read "highly configurable", and know it always involves editing config files. That said, Crunchbang's Openbox implementation is excellent and you probably won't need or want to change much past the default configuration. Iirc, there is a plugin for the menu which will automatically update as you install new apps. Look for it in Synaptic.

 

To be honest, LXDE is probably easier to use and configure, but its useful to experience Openbox on its own just to see how much extra you get with LXDE.

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threetonesun

How do I get that on my netbook? 

 

It's just part of KDE. KDE or Gnome used to be the big decision in Linux-world, before everyone went all nutty and started releasing their own flavor of window manager. Read a review of 4.10 here: http://www.muktware.com/5194/kde-410-review-time-switch-kde

 

KDE fell out of favor for a while (it was bloated, and not as cutting edge as say, Unity), but lately it seems the more sane option if you want a solid, customizable WM.

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moeburn

It's just part of KDE. KDE or Gnome used to be the big decision in Linux-world, before everyone went all nutty and started releasing their own flavor of window manager. Read a review of 4.10 here: http://www.muktware.com/5194/kde-410-review-time-switch-kde

 

KDE fell out of favor for a while (it was bloated, and not as cutting edge as say, Unity), but lately it seems the more sane option if you want a solid, customizable WM.

 

So I'm gonna try Kubuntu, since that comes preloaded with KDE Plasma Desktop, should be easy to switch to Plasma Netbook.

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HawkMan

BlackBox/FluxBox. depending on how light you want to go.

 

BB for super light with less customization Flux for basically the same thign but somewhat more customization ability. 

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moeburn

BlackBox/FluxBox. depending on how light you want to go.

 

BB for super light with less customization Flux for basically the same thign but somewhat more customization ability. 

 

Looks waaay too advanced for me.  The last time I used Linux was RedHat in 2001, and only briefly tried it out, so I'm basically a total newbie.  Sorry if you thought I was advanced when I said I'd try "Awesome", I didn't realise how advanced it was before I tried it.  I'm gonna see how Kubuntu plays out.

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AJerman

It's just part of KDE. KDE or Gnome used to be the big decision in Linux-world, before everyone went all nutty and started releasing their own flavor of window manager. Read a review of 4.10 here: http://www.muktware.com/5194/kde-410-review-time-switch-kde

 

KDE fell out of favor for a while (it was bloated, and not as cutting edge as say, Unity), but lately it seems the more sane option if you want a solid, customizable WM.

It was bloated for sure, and ugly as hell. I still think KDE is pretty ugly as it comes out of the box, but I suppose there's always room to customize and make it look however you want. I've always been on the Gnome side, though I'm still not sold on 3.x. It's too bad Cinnamon is too heavy for your netbook. I really like where they are going with Cinnamon so far.

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ViperAFK

Linux is very flexible. there is no reason for you to move away from mint xfce just because the mint software center was slow. You could simply install synaptic on mint XFCE and use that instead. Your previous issue with not getting shortcuts created when using synaptic sounded like an LXDE/lubuntu issue, not an issue with synaptic (I very often use synaptic in ubuntu and xubuntu with no such issues). Using synaptic with XFCE should give you no problems installing software. I have an older laptop that my dad uses with no problems that runs xubuntu :), xfce is very nice and simply to use.

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Max Norris

KDE as far as Linux desktops go is my personal favorite.. feels the most complete, definitely worth a try. Was never terribly thrilled with most of the others, and some of them (in my opinion) are just getting worse over time.  You a cited lack of customization/options.. KDE will bury you in options.  That said, probably not going to be too happy with KDE's performance on that netbook.  You mentioned Cinnamon running slow.. KDE's a bunch of things but lightweight isn't one of them.

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HawkMan

Looks waaay too advanced for me.  The last time I used Linux was RedHat in 2001, and only briefly tried it out, so I'm basically a total newbie.  Sorry if you thought I was advanced when I said I'd try "Awesome", I didn't realise how advanced it was before I tried it.  I'm gonna see how Kubuntu plays out.

 

nah, *box is easy to use, they're very simple actually they operate a bit differently than windows like desktops in that everything is on your right click menu but it's not complex or hard. 

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moeburn

I think I'm leaning back towards Lubuntu/LXDE.  It's just too amazingly fast to give up.  Sure there are other distros just as fast, but none geared toward the linux-noob like Lubuntu is.

 

I think I solved my lack of shortcuts problem with LXLauncher.  I didn't even know Lubuntu came with it, because it is nowhere in the start menu, but it's a great replacement for the desktop.

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sanctified

Have you tried MATE (Basically Gnome 2 recontinued) or Gnome Fallback?

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